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The never-before-told true account of the serial killers who terrorized Nashville’s music scene for decades—and the cold-case Murder Squad determined to bring an end to their sadistic sprees. Nashville—a haven for aspiring musicians and a magnet for country-music fans. By the time Pat Postiglione arrived there in 1980, it was also the scene of an unsolved series of vicious The never-before-told true account of the serial killers who terrorized Nashville’s music scene for decades—and the cold-case Murder Squad determined to bring an end to their sadistic sprees. Nashville—a haven for aspiring musicians and a magnet for country-music fans. By the time Pat Postiglione arrived there in 1980, it was also the scene of an unsolved series of vicious sex slayings that served as a harbinger of worse to come. As Postiglione was promoted from street-beat Metro cop to detective sergeant heading Music City’s elite cold-case Murder Squad, some of America’s most bizarre, elusive, and savage serial killers were calling Nashville home. And during the next two decades, the body count climbed. From Vanderbilt University to dive bars and out-of-the-way motels, Postiglione followed the bloody tracks of these ever-escalating crimes—each enacted by a different psychopath with the same intent: to murder without motive or remorse. But of all the investigations, of all the monsters Postiglione chased, few were as chilling, or as game changing, as the Rest Stop Killer: a homicidal trucker who turned the interstates into his trolling ground. Next stop, Nashville. But Postiglione was waiting.


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The never-before-told true account of the serial killers who terrorized Nashville’s music scene for decades—and the cold-case Murder Squad determined to bring an end to their sadistic sprees. Nashville—a haven for aspiring musicians and a magnet for country-music fans. By the time Pat Postiglione arrived there in 1980, it was also the scene of an unsolved series of vicious The never-before-told true account of the serial killers who terrorized Nashville’s music scene for decades—and the cold-case Murder Squad determined to bring an end to their sadistic sprees. Nashville—a haven for aspiring musicians and a magnet for country-music fans. By the time Pat Postiglione arrived there in 1980, it was also the scene of an unsolved series of vicious sex slayings that served as a harbinger of worse to come. As Postiglione was promoted from street-beat Metro cop to detective sergeant heading Music City’s elite cold-case Murder Squad, some of America’s most bizarre, elusive, and savage serial killers were calling Nashville home. And during the next two decades, the body count climbed. From Vanderbilt University to dive bars and out-of-the-way motels, Postiglione followed the bloody tracks of these ever-escalating crimes—each enacted by a different psychopath with the same intent: to murder without motive or remorse. But of all the investigations, of all the monsters Postiglione chased, few were as chilling, or as game changing, as the Rest Stop Killer: a homicidal trucker who turned the interstates into his trolling ground. Next stop, Nashville. But Postiglione was waiting.

30 review for Monster City: Murder, Music, and Mayhem in Nashville’s Dark Age

  1. 4 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    Monster City, Murder, Music, and the Mayhem in Nashville’s Dark Age * won on Goodreads I found this a well-paced true crime read covering Nashville’s serial killers during a particular period of time the author refers to as the Dark Age when there were a number of them active and the city was undergoing a renewal period. It also follows the career of a particular detective, Pat Postiglione who did an amazing job of clearing homicide cases once he was hired and came up through the ranks there to b Monster City, Murder, Music, and the Mayhem in Nashville’s Dark Age * won on Goodreads I found this a well-paced true crime read covering Nashville’s serial killers during a particular period of time the author refers to as the Dark Age when there were a number of them active and the city was undergoing a renewal period. It also follows the career of a particular detective, Pat Postiglione who did an amazing job of clearing homicide cases once he was hired and came up through the ranks there to become the head of the department. The city’s homicide detectives already had a better than average solve rate, but once Pat joined them, things became far better. I’d read about a couple of these, in particular, the Trimble girl scout murder, for sure but the rest were unheard of to me, which is always great. This is not for the faint of heart, it describes gruesome scene details of the many killings that are carried out by some really disturbed killers. I know at least one reviewer originally from Nashville had a problem with the author’s description of some of the locations, saying that they were incorrect. Not being from there or familiar with that area, I can’t speak to the accuracy, but it doesn’t really affect the readability much. My thanks for the advance electronic copy that was provided by NetGalley, author Michael Arntfield, and the publisher for my fair review. The Author-- Bestselling author Michael Arntfield is a veteran police officer, professor, and television host. Known by his students as "Profficer," an endearing blend of his academic and law enforcement professions, he teaches criminology at Western University and is a previous visiting Fulbright Chair at Vanderbilt University. With fifteen years of experience as a police officer, Arntfield offers a unique perspective into unsolved murder cases that combines suspenseful storytelling, academic knowledge, and investigative technology. He is the lead investigator on the true-crime series To Catch a Killer on the Oprah Winfrey Network in Canada and is the author of Murder City: The Untold Story of Canada's Serial Killer Capital. He is also Director of the Murder Accountability Project in the United States and both the founder and Director of the Western University Cold Case Society in Canada.  When he isn't teaching, investigating cold cases, or writing about them, he is researching long-term crime trends and developing new television projects. His latest research is on cyberbullying, social media, and psychopathy. Little A 352 pages Pub: Sept. 4th, 2018 RATING: 3.5/5 Stars My BookZone blog: https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Holly McCall

    This book is interesting when it focuses on legendary Nashville police Detective Pat Postiglione. But I suspect other natives who read this book will notice what I did: so many factual errors I lost count and a misrepresentation of crime in Nashville. Contrary to the author's portrayal as a city overrun by violent crime, Nashville has never been a high-crime city. The authors refers to so many parts of Nashville by incorrect names, I question how much time he spent here. In a portion of the book This book is interesting when it focuses on legendary Nashville police Detective Pat Postiglione. But I suspect other natives who read this book will notice what I did: so many factual errors I lost count and a misrepresentation of crime in Nashville. Contrary to the author's portrayal as a city overrun by violent crime, Nashville has never been a high-crime city. The authors refers to so many parts of Nashville by incorrect names, I question how much time he spent here. In a portion of the book set in the mid-1980s, he refers to residents of The Gulch and Germantown. The first residential building in the Gulch opened in 2002: there were literally no residents of the Gulch in the mid-'80s and Germantown at the same time consisted of a handful of restored homes. He confuses Section 8 housing with public housing projects. If there were only a few errors, it might not bother me, but again, there are so many I could hardly concentrate for wondering when the next one was coming.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm kind of an odd duck in that I'm not always a huge fan of true crime novels, but I have this deep seeded fascination with stories about serial killers. I thought I'd get that out of the way before I start this review in earnest, so that you'll know where I'm coming from. My interest in this book was purely driven by the fact that Michael Arntfield was taking an in-depth look at a spree of serial murders. The fact that it was set in Nashville, which has such a rich tapestry of people and histo I'm kind of an odd duck in that I'm not always a huge fan of true crime novels, but I have this deep seeded fascination with stories about serial killers. I thought I'd get that out of the way before I start this review in earnest, so that you'll know where I'm coming from. My interest in this book was purely driven by the fact that Michael Arntfield was taking an in-depth look at a spree of serial murders. The fact that it was set in Nashville, which has such a rich tapestry of people and history, just made it that much more intriguing to me. Unfortunately, it didn't quite live up to what I expected. While I absolutely understand that this is a work of non-fiction, and therefore simply compiling facts, the problem with Monster City was that it didn't really come together in a way that felt coherent. This book focuses on Pat Postiglione, a detective that really brought everything he had to the team that tracked down these killers. He ran through cold cases in a way that baffled his coworkers, and impressed them at the same time. In that respect, this book is utterly fascinating! However as the book makes its way through the series of cases that Pat pulls from the archives, it really rambles and jumps around. There were portions of this book where I was so confused by which case was being discussed at any given time, that I had to flip back a page or two and reorient myself. Pat's cases, while brutal and interesting, all had similar aspects to them. Which meant that at a certain point all of them meshed into one another and left me confused. I really just wanted a clearer path to follow. I can definitely say that, despite my gripes about cohesion, the content of this book is compulsively readable. That's why I decided to go ahead and award it the rating that I did. Arntfield did a lot of research, and you can absolutely tell. This book probably could have benefited from a bit more structure though, to keep the reader on a solid path forward.

  4. 5 out of 5

    JK

    Living in Middle, TN, I was very intrigued by this book. The intrigue lasted... maybe through the first chapter. After that, it became tedious and confusing. I made it to the section where Paul Dennis Reed started his savage killing spree and had to give up. Firstly, the author wrote this as if it were a murder mystery and throwing out cliffhangers and tantalizing comments. This is true crime - people's lives are and were horribly affected. There is no reason to embellish on the drama. Secondly, Living in Middle, TN, I was very intrigued by this book. The intrigue lasted... maybe through the first chapter. After that, it became tedious and confusing. I made it to the section where Paul Dennis Reed started his savage killing spree and had to give up. Firstly, the author wrote this as if it were a murder mystery and throwing out cliffhangers and tantalizing comments. This is true crime - people's lives are and were horribly affected. There is no reason to embellish on the drama. Secondly, the author persists in going off on tangents regarding criminal justice terms and how science and psychology has evolved in the last several decades, but made it sound as if our police force were working in the dark ages prior to DNA testing and any other advances. He persistently describes sub-types of personality disorders (in particular, he really likes necrophilia and it's subcategories). He describes "what we now know as a "lust murder"". Last time I checked, that one had been around for a while and loosely referred to as a "crime of passion" or "rage", unless that is some odd sub-text that I skipped over because this book is sooooo boring and confusing. Thirdly, the going off on tangents really ruins the flow of the book. In the tangents with the introduction of terms and descriptions of other crimes that don't take place in Nashville, results in very confused reading. Fourthly, I got the impression that he kind of looks down on Nashville. He makes it seem as though Nashville had/has a backwoods police force. Sorry dude, we aren't the backwards hicks you make us out to be and our police force is made of a whole lot of dedicated individuals who do their best protect our community. Fifthly, he also is really, really, impressed with his own intelligence. Since he likes to use 50 cent words, let's throw out "hubris", "egotistical", "vainglorious", and "self-aggrandizing". Sixth, the unimportant details. Do we really need to know what kind of phone the office answered a call on, while he was at home? Do we really need to know how tacky he thinks Captain D's restaurants are? I went to college with the cousin of one of the murder victims from Captain D's. COMPLETELY UNCALLED FOR. And lastly, learn the definition of "ironically". There is NO irony in the fact that a killer drove a Chevy Lumina and so did the cops. I'm only giving this book one star because we're not allowed to give a negative score. The book was confusing (and, quite frankly, if I wanted additional schooling on Criminal Justice, I'd just go back and get my Master's degree in it) and I don't even think it was particularly well researched including basing descriptions of areas of the city as they are now, and not as they were when the crime was committed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    A case of making facts fit your theory. Some parts were poorly researched and some events were a stretch to make his case of Nashville being a serial killer destination. Just because a police detective in Nashville solved these cases it doesn't lend credence that Nashville is a murder capitol. Some of these cases are not serial as inferred in the book. I listened to the audio version and I don't know if it is how the narrator interpreted it or if the author wrote it that way but there is a stron A case of making facts fit your theory. Some parts were poorly researched and some events were a stretch to make his case of Nashville being a serial killer destination. Just because a police detective in Nashville solved these cases it doesn't lend credence that Nashville is a murder capitol. Some of these cases are not serial as inferred in the book. I listened to the audio version and I don't know if it is how the narrator interpreted it or if the author wrote it that way but there is a strong sense of derision and scorn for Nashville and its populace. Others have mentioned the scattered shotgun blast approach of writing which I agree it did make it very hard at times to follow the narrative and know exactly which murder was being discussed. Overall a poor read and not reccomended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Armand Rosamilia

    The attention to detail in this book is amazing, and the timelines for each serial killer and how they affected Nashville stands out for me. I read a lot of these true crime books but this one is at the top of the list.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily Nelson

    I really wanted to like this book.... I have rarely read such a disjointed, jump all over the place, confusing book. Some things are clear. The author has kinda of a crush on the MURDER SQUAD detective, Pat P. He also HATES Captain D's Seafood restaurant, calling it's decor "tacky" and it's slogan " incredibly unoriginal" which actually made me chuckle. And Detective Pat' s partner had he TEMERITY TO TAKE UP GOLF! I found myself reading and thinking, "now, which murder was this? That was solved, I really wanted to like this book.... I have rarely read such a disjointed, jump all over the place, confusing book. Some things are clear. The author has kinda of a crush on the MURDER SQUAD detective, Pat P. He also HATES Captain D's Seafood restaurant, calling it's decor "tacky" and it's slogan " incredibly unoriginal" which actually made me chuckle. And Detective Pat' s partner had he TEMERITY TO TAKE UP GOLF! I found myself reading and thinking, "now, which murder was this? That was solved, so WHO is this person? What did he do? When was this? Should have been much better. Glad it was free.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    Ultimately this was an underwhelming read, although it did make me feel very hard-boiled and noir-ish for having lived in (and survived!) Nashville -- which I found to be a wonderful and welcoming city -- during its "Dark Age." This book suffers from the author's indecision about his focus. Is this a case history of murders, a snapshot of a city, a biography of a lead detective, or an origin story for a cold-case team? The lack of focus leads to confusion, because stories are told out of order o Ultimately this was an underwhelming read, although it did make me feel very hard-boiled and noir-ish for having lived in (and survived!) Nashville -- which I found to be a wonderful and welcoming city -- during its "Dark Age." This book suffers from the author's indecision about his focus. Is this a case history of murders, a snapshot of a city, a biography of a lead detective, or an origin story for a cold-case team? The lack of focus leads to confusion, because stories are told out of order or without context, and nothing gets satisfactory resolution.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maria Suarez

    Supposedly this cop broke records at clearing cold case files, they just released the guy who was jailed for the murder of the "happy ending" tan salon girls because the DNA said it was not him. Makes me wonder how many other cold cases this guy "solved" by imprisoning an innocent person. I was enjoying the great work I thought he'd done, until I started checking the truth on the internet.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Page

    Monster City is basically a love letter to one detective, Pat Postiglione who cleared a ridiculous number of difficult cases in and around Nashville Tennessee over a couple of decades. The book covers a collection of murders both isolated and serial, but it is the serial killings that become the focus. The amount of detail about each case varies greatly - sometimes offering little more than conjecture and sometimes diving into graphic descriptions of the scenes. This is not a book for the squeam Monster City is basically a love letter to one detective, Pat Postiglione who cleared a ridiculous number of difficult cases in and around Nashville Tennessee over a couple of decades. The book covers a collection of murders both isolated and serial, but it is the serial killings that become the focus. The amount of detail about each case varies greatly - sometimes offering little more than conjecture and sometimes diving into graphic descriptions of the scenes. This is not a book for the squeamish. Bottom line: I expected more from this book: more coherence, more focus, less repetition. Better editing and better writing (the author is an academic! this reads like a first draft). So many times, throughout this book, I was pulled out of the narrative because I became annoyed at the writing structure: awkward phrasing; words repeated within the same sentence; whole swaths of detail being reiterated over and over as if each chapter had been written by different authors with no knowledge of what came before. In all honesty I nearly gave up after the opening chapter which was so poorly written I thought I'd bought the wrong book. I don't read a lot of true crime and I was in the mood for something I knew nothing about so this book caught my eye. The subject was compelling enough to finish the book but I cannot recommend it as the quality was so disappointing. I may, however, keep my eyes pealed for other books on the serial killings outlined within these pages.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    Wish I could give it a 3.75. I think the structure of the intro misleads the reader into thinking it’s going to be about one killer rather than what it’s was: a study of the remarkable cases handled by one investigator. Great story with a few structural issues.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    Having lived in Nashville my whole life, this book was really interesting. It wasn't until the later murders that I actually remember hearing about them on the news. HOWEVER, I have some bones to pick with this book. (I listened to it.) At one point, while talking about a murder in 1993, it mentions it was the same night a movie opened at the Regal Cinema in Opry Mills. There was no such thing in 1993. In 93, we were still enjoying Opryland and had no idea the Mills mall would ever come to be. A Having lived in Nashville my whole life, this book was really interesting. It wasn't until the later murders that I actually remember hearing about them on the news. HOWEVER, I have some bones to pick with this book. (I listened to it.) At one point, while talking about a murder in 1993, it mentions it was the same night a movie opened at the Regal Cinema in Opry Mills. There was no such thing in 1993. In 93, we were still enjoying Opryland and had no idea the Mills mall would ever come to be. And the second thing was said about seeing something on the 11:00 news. We are in central time. Our news comes on at 10. That bugged me. Also, he starts out talking about murders in Vandyland - the area(s) around Vanderbilt. I have never in my life heard it called Vandyland. He also mentions the Gulch in, like, the early 80s, and I don't even know that that was an area (at least not called that) at the time. Small things, but do your homework.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bettye McKee

    Meet the Monster Hunter This is an excellent book, well-written and easy to read. The central focus of the book is Patrick Postiglione who moved from New York City to Nashville to spend his years as part of the Metro Police. After serving with the Seabees, he joined the NYPD, but his fellow Seabees had filled his head with stories about Nashville. After visiting, he decided that was where he wanted to be. After a few years with the Metro, he made detective and set up the M (for Murder) Squad and b Meet the Monster Hunter This is an excellent book, well-written and easy to read. The central focus of the book is Patrick Postiglione who moved from New York City to Nashville to spend his years as part of the Metro Police. After serving with the Seabees, he joined the NYPD, but his fellow Seabees had filled his head with stories about Nashville. After visiting, he decided that was where he wanted to be. After a few years with the Metro, he made detective and set up the M (for Murder) Squad and began his brilliant career of catching murderers, serial killers and other offenders. Postiglione had a particular interest in unsolved "cold cases" and eventually formed a Cold Case Unit, solving 55 cold cases in eight years. Some of the crimes he worked are related in appropriate detail and are some of the most vicious murders you can imagine. We should all be grateful for men of Postiglione's caliber, men of honor and dedication, men who work ceaselessly to make our world a safer place to live and work. 6

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    In terms of its being a gripping read, I would give Michael Arntfield's "Monster City" five stars. I started it while in the middle of another book and ultimately set that one aside. The book contains a lot of intriguing details about crimes, particularly serial murders, that occurred in or around Nashville, Tennessee in the past four decades. Arntfield focuses on Detective Pat Postiglione's quest to solve these crimes. Postiglione brought two serial killers to justice (the Fast Food Killer and In terms of its being a gripping read, I would give Michael Arntfield's "Monster City" five stars. I started it while in the middle of another book and ultimately set that one aside. The book contains a lot of intriguing details about crimes, particularly serial murders, that occurred in or around Nashville, Tennessee in the past four decades. Arntfield focuses on Detective Pat Postiglione's quest to solve these crimes. Postiglione brought two serial killers to justice (the Fast Food Killer and the Rest Stop Killer), among many other murderers, and also established a successful cold case squad in Nashville. So what kept this from being a five star review? I think there are some structural problems with the book. Arntfield jumps around. A lot. He starts by describing crimes that won't be resolved for years. By the time he returns to these murders toward the end of the book, readers have forgotten the details. The author's propensity to end chapters with cliffhangers is in poor taste given that these were real victims. Ultimately I think Arntfield tried to tackle too much. By describing so many crimes, he doesn't delve into any of them in great detail. Is "Monster City" supposed to be a profile of a great detective? Or a study in the reasons why Nashville became a haven for murder? Either way, Arntfield fails at his task. I think the book would've been improved had the author stuck to more details instead of editorializing. His constant descriptions of killers as cruel or sadistic and cops as heroic, etc., become tiresome. We all know killers are bad and cops are good. I also felt his attempts to classify every murderer as a personality type (psychopath, etc.) were somewhat pedantic and ineffective. Interestingly, it looks like the suspect Postiglione pegged for the Tanning Bed murders was just exonerated due to bad forensic evidence. I'm convinced there's been a lot of murder in or around Nashville, but the author doesn't take a guess as to why. My basic requirement for any book is competent writing, and Arntfield is certainly a competent writer who I also think is an expert in his field. I just wish his editor would've worked harder to wrestle "Monster City" into a more focused narrative with more facts, a clearer theme, and less editorializing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Dars

    Nashville. Music City. A place where hopefuls come in search of country music stardom. A place where monsters come to murder. Since the early 1970s, Nashville has been the killing ground of a disproportionate number of violent predators. It’s also home to Detective Pat Postiglione, now retired, who lead the elite M Squad and later the city’s first cold case unit, putting many of those monsters behind bars. Notable cases each include the Tanning Bed Murders, the Rest Stop Murders, the Motel Murde Nashville. Music City. A place where hopefuls come in search of country music stardom. A place where monsters come to murder. Since the early 1970s, Nashville has been the killing ground of a disproportionate number of violent predators. It’s also home to Detective Pat Postiglione, now retired, who lead the elite M Squad and later the city’s first cold case unit, putting many of those monsters behind bars. Notable cases each include the Tanning Bed Murders, the Rest Stop Murders, the Motel Murders, and the Vandyland Murders, and these are each given a section in the book, though the Janet March and Carl Williams murders as well as others are also discussed. In Monster City, Michael Arntfield collects the stories of these murders, many committed by serial killers, and tracks the investigative process, highlighting how techniques have changed over time. As an academic and former police officer, Arntfield combines practical knowledge with theoretical insights into types of killers, meanings of weapons, interview techniques, and what the state of the body says about the perpetrator. He also references other infamous killers when relevant and sprinkles the text with allusions to popular culture like True Detective and the Making of a Murderer. Though detailed, the book isn’t sensational. When my parents were first married, they lived in Nashville, and my father attended Vanderbilt Divinity School, so I had a personal interest in the subject. I’m a true crime aficionado as well, watching Investigation Discovery frequently, and while I had heard of some of the killers (particularly Janet March, who had an episode of 48 Hours devoted to her disappearance), this was the first time I’d been introduced to some of the cases. I also did enjoy how Arnfield included the latest forensic developments. That said, the book was more complicated to read than it should have been. Information was presented in a strange order, as were phrases within sentences. I found myself often confused and rereading for clarification. At times, too, the prose was overwritten, and I was surprised by the overuse of the word “inevitable.” Arnfield attempted to link the murders through Postiglione, but the reality is that they were distinct crimes, so the linkages felt like a stretch. Also, it was at times implied that the killers were playing a deliberate cat-and-mouse came with Postiglione during the investigation, which doesn’t seem to be the case--though Postiglione was a target after the fact. Unfortunately for Arntfield, at the time he wrote the book, one of the cold cases seemed resolved, with a man indicted for the murders. But this past summer, charges were dropped. That section now rings hollow since much of it tracked the movements of the now-exonerated suspect. Perhaps the greatest missed opportunity, though, was an exploration of why Nashville attracted so many serial killers and violent murderers. Given the focus on the city itself, this seemed a glaring omission. I received a free copy of Monster City through a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you Goodreads and Little A. ~Find Me Online~ ...aka darzy... Instagram Twitter Flickr Goodreads Facebook

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ursula Johnson

    Monsters Meet Their Match This was a fascinating book on the little known crime spree in Nashville, as well as a profile of police profiler extraordinaire Pat Postiglione, an amazing man with a gift for tracking the worst of the worst. His talents allowed him to see connections others could not. Part of the narrative is the sections detailing his prowess of pioneering research methods years before the rest of the law enforcement community. I felt like cheering him on when he discovers and outfits Monsters Meet Their Match This was a fascinating book on the little known crime spree in Nashville, as well as a profile of police profiler extraordinaire Pat Postiglione, an amazing man with a gift for tracking the worst of the worst. His talents allowed him to see connections others could not. Part of the narrative is the sections detailing his prowess of pioneering research methods years before the rest of the law enforcement community. I felt like cheering him on when he discovers and outfits the deviants and monsters who preyed upon innocents. It is amazing that these stories weren't nationwide news. The majority were caught, but there were a few cases still pending. While our hero retired from one force, he joined another. I for one am glad this is in his blood. The ultimate fish out of water, fit in just fine. I was glued to the narrative, it was an excellent, well written story that also delves into what makes some of these monsters tick. I read this book using immersion reading while listening to the audiobook. The masterful Jonathan Davis beautifully captured the tone of this work and brings it to life. A must read for fans of criminal procedures.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Cody

    I enjoyed reading this true crime book. It's paced well until the end, when it seems somewhat to falter in an attempt to wrap up. As another reviewer here complained, the book sets up cliffhangers for revelations that are passed over pretty quickly and mundanely at the end--the threat Detective Postiglione was under from Mendenhall, the impending return to Nashville of Patrick Streater. But I think that I was disappointed in the end because I was generally so captivated and informed throughout t I enjoyed reading this true crime book. It's paced well until the end, when it seems somewhat to falter in an attempt to wrap up. As another reviewer here complained, the book sets up cliffhangers for revelations that are passed over pretty quickly and mundanely at the end--the threat Detective Postiglione was under from Mendenhall, the impending return to Nashville of Patrick Streater. But I think that I was disappointed in the end because I was generally so captivated and informed throughout the reading until the Epilogue. I lived in Nashville through the 1980s, but I remember little of the few '80s stories here. As a songwriter very interested in all things Music Row, I remember the Kevin Hughes murder, which took place just a few months before I moved back to the North Carolina mountains. I returned to Nashville fairly regularly during the '90s and beyond, but I guess I'm glad that I moved away before many of these killers came around. I still love Nashville and still visit friends there as often as I can, and I still love walking around Music Row. But after reading Arntfield's book, I might look at its shadows a little more closely than I generally tend to do.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Drew Zagorski

    Won this book in a Goodreads giveaway... I'm a fan of true crime and this title caught my attention several months back, before it was published. I guess I read the synopsis a bit too quick because I didn't pick up on the fact that this book was following the career of Pat Postiglione, a legendary homicide detective in Nashville. So, when I thought I would get the story of the hunt for a single serial killer, I got a book that covered a lot of the cases Postiglione worked on. My disappointment w Won this book in a Goodreads giveaway... I'm a fan of true crime and this title caught my attention several months back, before it was published. I guess I read the synopsis a bit too quick because I didn't pick up on the fact that this book was following the career of Pat Postiglione, a legendary homicide detective in Nashville. So, when I thought I would get the story of the hunt for a single serial killer, I got a book that covered a lot of the cases Postiglione worked on. My disappointment was based only in that. We never got to the depth on any of the cases that one would get if reading about a single case. That being said, the book is well done (though certainly not for the faint of heart as it's very detailed in descriptions of the crimes) and if you're looking for something that focuses on a broad span of different crimes, then this would be a good book. I imagine at some point down the road I might pick this up again and re-read it with the correct perception going in.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    I am a fan of true crime but have found so many books of this genre to be poorly written. This was no exception. Lots of (big) words but very few details surrounding the many cases discussed here. The book is so disjointed, jumping from case to case and decade to decade that I often had to go back and re orient myself. The author spends way too much time discussing paraphilia, DNA, and the advances in crime solving technologies. Clearly the author is very knowledgeable on these subjects and make I am a fan of true crime but have found so many books of this genre to be poorly written. This was no exception. Lots of (big) words but very few details surrounding the many cases discussed here. The book is so disjointed, jumping from case to case and decade to decade that I often had to go back and re orient myself. The author spends way too much time discussing paraphilia, DNA, and the advances in crime solving technologies. Clearly the author is very knowledgeable on these subjects and makes some valid points, but making them once would have been sufficient. The title also makes it sound like there is a common thread to all of the murders that connects them and makes them unique to Nashville. The author fails to make that connection, these were all distinct cases, the majority of which could have happened in any city. I would have enjoyed a more in depth portrait of Pat Postiglione and his toughest cases. Quality over quantity.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    Although this true crime book wasn’t what I had anticipated, it was a good read. I did not get a taste of the city which was a little disappointing, but the book kept my interest throughout. I was torn between four and five stars and decided to round up, because in a way the focus on one detective meant I learned about more than one murder. (Boy, that sounds ghoulish! Whatever!) I enjoyed the book. There were times when it seemed that the author was repetitive, but in this case that was helpful Although this true crime book wasn’t what I had anticipated, it was a good read. I did not get a taste of the city which was a little disappointing, but the book kept my interest throughout. I was torn between four and five stars and decided to round up, because in a way the focus on one detective meant I learned about more than one murder. (Boy, that sounds ghoulish! Whatever!) I enjoyed the book. There were times when it seemed that the author was repetitive, but in this case that was helpful since he was covering so much information and a reader might need the prompts. Still, over all the information seemed well researched. The audio book’s narrator was good, too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Harvey Smith

    Fascinating study of a time in history before DNA and even data bases existed. The story follows one, and then a team of Nashville detectives who tried to solve seeming unsolvable murders. In fact, many of the cases went cold, and as the years went on, DNA analysis and crime data bases evolved and allowed many cold cases to be solved. Most importantly, the book lets the reader see how and why serial killers operate, what motivates them, and the patterns that most (if not all) of them fall into. Sp Fascinating study of a time in history before DNA and even data bases existed. The story follows one, and then a team of Nashville detectives who tried to solve seeming unsolvable murders. In fact, many of the cases went cold, and as the years went on, DNA analysis and crime data bases evolved and allowed many cold cases to be solved. Most importantly, the book lets the reader see how and why serial killers operate, what motivates them, and the patterns that most (if not all) of them fall into. Spoiler alert......think in terms of a collector collecting things, and victims being selected often times randomly.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tim Roberson

    Outstanding case study of Pat Postiglione’s career Being a lifelong resident of the Nashville area, this book brought back memories of some of the more infamous crimes in this area from my childhood to more recent years. In as much as it was about the crimes themselves, the book was an excellent insight on the man who headed up the team that solved most of these crimes and brought the perpetrators to justice. Definitely worth a read if you are a true crime lover and even more so if you are a Nash Outstanding case study of Pat Postiglione’s career Being a lifelong resident of the Nashville area, this book brought back memories of some of the more infamous crimes in this area from my childhood to more recent years. In as much as it was about the crimes themselves, the book was an excellent insight on the man who headed up the team that solved most of these crimes and brought the perpetrators to justice. Definitely worth a read if you are a true crime lover and even more so if you are a Nashvillian. Be ready for a ride down memory lane.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    So many murders! Nashville is definitely not safe! Actually the serial murderers in the book were killing back in the 1970s to early 2000s. Perhaps it's less murderous in Nashville now that these killers are off the street and in jail. The book follows one cop in particular. He worked on the murder squad for many years, and then put together Nashville's first cold case unit. He has had an amazing rate of success, finding the killers. Very persevering.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Millett

    Exceptional true crime book This book involved several murderers and serial killers in Nashville, Tennessee. The primary detective, Pat Postiglione is an incredibly, dedicated police detective who never quits. In fact he goes on to solve 55 cold cases as well as multiple current cases. This is a truly incredible book about one man's fight to catch the criminals and rid the city of crime. I highly recommend this book to those who love true crime.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Clark Bosslet

    Sections of the book read as pulp and the author relies on a nonlinear narrative to draw broader connections between crimes, both of which can be off putting at first. As many others here note, I’m not sure Nashville ever had the crime stats (relative to other cities) to support its characterization here. But those issues aside, I found the book well paced and the evolution of scientific thinking in crime fighting and suspectology fascinating.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    A True Crime Classic I have always been interested in discovering why people do the things they do, so this book was a revelation for me. I learned that the world of serial killers is even darker than I believed. I also learned there is another group of people, primarily made up of police officers, that dedicate decades of their lives to bringing these monsters to justice. The hearts of darkness are more unfathomable than you can possibly imagine. Highly recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    Pat Postiglione is def a true American hero. I enjoyed hearing about a bunch of bizarre and terrifying crime stories out of Nashville but damn this book was a bit too wordy. There were way too many paragraph length sentences which made it a slightly more arduous read but I’d still recommend it to any true crime fan.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andra

    This books was a compelling read! I usually try to stay away from this kind of stuff but this story intrigued me so I gave it a try. When I had time to read, I wasn't able to put it down. I would love to know even more about Pat's methods of investigation. The man must have been incredibly determined.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Donnell

    Nashville’s dark side I grew up in Nashville and had heard of most of these crimes. Marsha Tremble was a few months older than me. I was ecstatic when technology enabled law enforcement to solve the decades old case. This book is a narrative of some of the worst crimes in Nashville and the man and his team responsible for solving them.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I was interested because I live in Nashville and remember following some of the cases in the news. Premise good but the author kept repeating the story of the lead detective’s reasons for coming to Nashville, and repeated several stories. I understand the need to jump back and forth in time but there seemed to be no logic. Good premise, bad execution.

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