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Attraction, desire, breaking up, making up: Body Music explores the language of love and relationships. Set in Montreal, a typical metropolis where strangers meet under varying circumstances and either fall in love or break apart, Julie Maroh’s gentle hues and fanciful vignettes unearth the pleasures, surprises, and complexities of love.


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Attraction, desire, breaking up, making up: Body Music explores the language of love and relationships. Set in Montreal, a typical metropolis where strangers meet under varying circumstances and either fall in love or break apart, Julie Maroh’s gentle hues and fanciful vignettes unearth the pleasures, surprises, and complexities of love.

30 review for Body Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    [Shai] Bibliophage

    Body Music contains 21 beautiful short stories about love, lust and relationships. There are several stories that I did like particularly the The Ghost of Illness, On The Importance of Laughter, and The Aftermath. I was able to read this spectacular graphic novel by Julie Maroh on one seating and it made me sad, teary-eyed, and happy while reading the stories. Thanks to Arsenal Pulp Press for the ARC of this book. Body Music contains 21 beautiful short stories about love, lust and relationships. There are several stories that I did like particularly the The Ghost of Illness, On The Importance of Laughter, and The Aftermath. I was able to read this spectacular graphic novel by Julie Maroh on one seating and it made me sad, teary-eyed, and happy while reading the stories. Thanks to Arsenal Pulp Press for the ARC of this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Body Music, Maroh’s third book, is about love in its many forms and stages, with a range of ethnicities and sexualities, some happy, some sad. I read Skandalon and Blue is the Warmest Color and liked them all right, 3 stars each. I think this book is a little more ambitious, and features maybe some advance in her warm watercolor art. Blue focused on one relationship and this book features 21 vignettes of love, lust, and relationships. One guy is in a wheelchair; with one couple, one guy is marri Body Music, Maroh’s third book, is about love in its many forms and stages, with a range of ethnicities and sexualities, some happy, some sad. I read Skandalon and Blue is the Warmest Color and liked them all right, 3 stars each. I think this book is a little more ambitious, and features maybe some advance in her warm watercolor art. Blue focused on one relationship and this book features 21 vignettes of love, lust, and relationships. One guy is in a wheelchair; with one couple, one guy is married to a woman, and he has an affair--It’s called “Fuck Buddies”--with a guy. Some are sexy, some are sad, some are funny, and so on. I think the range might have something to offer anyone, and they are set in seemingly romantic Montreal. The point is clearly inclusivity. I am having trouble articulating why I am not raving about this book as many are doing. I guess the vignettes might also be seen as snapshots, or quick sketches, or moments in time, like a book of photographs of different kinds of lovers, with a touch more movement, obviously. But I am having trouble saying that I am moved by them. The back cover calls it “exhilarating,” which I think could be/is the experience of many readers. I’ll say it is my favorite work of Maroh’s so far. Maybe other reviews or a second reading will change my rating.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Julie Maroh's introduction to Body Music explains that she wrote the story specifically to show that love and sex happen with all kinds of people, not just heteronormative cisgendered folks. While I firmly applaud that storytelling vision, the way she's actually gone about it is...just not all that interesting. Body Music is composed of about two dozen very short stories, each detailing a night of passion or season of longing or something in between. We never really get to know the characters, s Julie Maroh's introduction to Body Music explains that she wrote the story specifically to show that love and sex happen with all kinds of people, not just heteronormative cisgendered folks. While I firmly applaud that storytelling vision, the way she's actually gone about it is...just not all that interesting. Body Music is composed of about two dozen very short stories, each detailing a night of passion or season of longing or something in between. We never really get to know the characters, so it very quickly becomes a guessing game for what type of sexual relations we'll encounter in the next story. I feel like that completely defeats Maroh's purpose. We're supposed to read this collection as a way of seeing that everyone, no matter who they are or who/what they like, can feel love and rejection and joy and sorrow. But because we don't get to know who any of these people are, the rough sketch leaves the reader to focus on the only notable aspect of each story - namely, how the characters like to fuck. Certainly, this could just be me as the reader with my own hangups. But I feel like I would have found maybe four lengthier stories more compelling than two dozen extremely short ones. If Maroh wants to show the world that love is everywhere and should be acceptable in all of its forms, I think she needs to show that these characters are full, rounded individuals, not just a person who is in a threesome, for example. Once we know who the character is outside of their sexual proclivities, we're more likely to realize that those proclivities don't determine who they are as a person. That said, Body Music is extremely well intentioned and that deserves to be applauded. Maroh's art is also excellent, sinuous and sensual or detailed and clinical when it needs to be.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    This graphic novel is translated from the French. Each section is a different relationship story, and they run the gamut in relationship stages, the types of people in the relationships, and whether or not they have happy endings. The art is beautiful and I enjoyed Montreal as a setting. My only complaint is that I genuinely did not want them to end. Translation wise, there is one moment where the translation of slang does not ring true, but overall this did not detract from my enjoyment. Thanks This graphic novel is translated from the French. Each section is a different relationship story, and they run the gamut in relationship stages, the types of people in the relationships, and whether or not they have happy endings. The art is beautiful and I enjoyed Montreal as a setting. My only complaint is that I genuinely did not want them to end. Translation wise, there is one moment where the translation of slang does not ring true, but overall this did not detract from my enjoyment. Thanks to the publisher for providing access through Edelweiss.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    I wanted to like this. I was a big fan of her earlier book, but this didn't work for me. There are 21 unconnected short stories herein. The faces look too much alike, I was probably halfway through before I realized that the stories were not connected. I kept trying to match the people up, because the stories are plotless slices of life. They don't start, they don't end, and I don't get a sense of the people other than that tiny slice. I wanted more depth. I wanted to like this. I was a big fan of her earlier book, but this didn't work for me. There are 21 unconnected short stories herein. The faces look too much alike, I was probably halfway through before I realized that the stories were not connected. I kept trying to match the people up, because the stories are plotless slices of life. They don't start, they don't end, and I don't get a sense of the people other than that tiny slice. I wanted more depth.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    A collection of short sexy pieces depicting many different relationships. Great visibility for a variety of diverse lives and lifestyles (body type diversity, skin tone diversity, and more). Extra yay for including polyamory (more than once!). I ate this so fast. Many of the pieces would fit right in at Oh Joy Sex Toy. I don't remember there being any recurring characters, or anything tying the stories together besides the theme, and possibly the city/setting. A small range of illustration appro A collection of short sexy pieces depicting many different relationships. Great visibility for a variety of diverse lives and lifestyles (body type diversity, skin tone diversity, and more). Extra yay for including polyamory (more than once!). I ate this so fast. Many of the pieces would fit right in at Oh Joy Sex Toy. I don't remember there being any recurring characters, or anything tying the stories together besides the theme, and possibly the city/setting. A small range of illustration approaches - sometimes more shading, sometimes more contrast. All grayscale (though am I imagining some variations in the gray base tone?). Super yummy. To amp it up even more, i would have loved to see Maroh add some color-work here, since it was such a pivotal strength of Blue is the Warmest Color. But yes, good.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Figgy

    Review to come. Overall a varied and interesting collection of relationships and experiences. Some are more well-rounded than others, and a couple of the short and seemingly incomplete stories come back into play later in the collection. The art style is really interesting, somehow simple but complex all at once.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Athena Lathos

    Julie Maroh wrote that her intention with Body Music was to illustrate the realities of "bow-legged, chubby, ethnic, trans, pierced, scarred, ill, disabled, old, [and] hairy" people who are too often "outside all the usual aesthetic categories" that we associate with love stories. Though some of these stories were simple in terms of dialogue and scope, the beautiful, surprising, and innovative images in this graphic novel do justice to her intention. There is something gentle and cozy about each Julie Maroh wrote that her intention with Body Music was to illustrate the realities of "bow-legged, chubby, ethnic, trans, pierced, scarred, ill, disabled, old, [and] hairy" people who are too often "outside all the usual aesthetic categories" that we associate with love stories. Though some of these stories were simple in terms of dialogue and scope, the beautiful, surprising, and innovative images in this graphic novel do justice to her intention. There is something gentle and cozy about each of the vignettes in Body Music, and it is really affirming to see so many relationships constructed of people who are "outside" of socially normative aesthetic categories depicted with such sincere tenderness. A few panels in particular-- like those that illustrated a deaf man's hands signing in an argument with his partner-- were so creatively designed that they reminded me of why it is so important to read stories told in this graphic format.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emma Rund

    This is only the second graphic novel I have ever read but this was LOVELY. The artwork is beautiful and it read like poetry. A thoughtful and gorgeous meditation on love in its many forms.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I love the inclusiveness of sexualities, genders, race and ethnicities in this collection of vignettes about love and sex. I'm just not really a fan of tiny stories about small moments though. I think fans of that type of storytelling will find this very appealing. I love the inclusiveness of sexualities, genders, race and ethnicities in this collection of vignettes about love and sex. I'm just not really a fan of tiny stories about small moments though. I think fans of that type of storytelling will find this very appealing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melissa (YA Book Shelf)

    Read this book in one sitting. It's a series of vignettes that take place in various Montréal neighbourhoods, which gave it a big time nostalgia factor for me, between a wide variety of characters. It's super queer and sex positive, and it even deals with polyamorous relationships without judgement, which is definitely outside of the status quo. It deals with fears, insecurities, problems, and the amazing moments of falling in love, lust, and everything in between. None of this should be surpris Read this book in one sitting. It's a series of vignettes that take place in various Montréal neighbourhoods, which gave it a big time nostalgia factor for me, between a wide variety of characters. It's super queer and sex positive, and it even deals with polyamorous relationships without judgement, which is definitely outside of the status quo. It deals with fears, insecurities, problems, and the amazing moments of falling in love, lust, and everything in between. None of this should be surprising if you've read Julie Maroh's previous work, Blue is the Warmest Color. Julie brings the city of Montréal, including it's iconic architecture to life and I also loved some other key aspects of the art, like the French Bulldog in one vignette and the ginger cat in another. I didn't love ye drawings of most of the characters...just not my style, and I was surprised to see that most of the book was monochromatic with the occasional light amount of blue to signify the snow and ice.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    21 short stories of love in all it's colours, shapes and sizes. Wasn't expecting this to be set in Montreal and was pleasantly surprised (even a brief Guy Maddin mention). The art and stories are simple but it's nice to see the variety of love shown here. Some stories are about the beginning of a relationship, some about the end and everything between. 21 short stories of love in all it's colours, shapes and sizes. Wasn't expecting this to be set in Montreal and was pleasantly surprised (even a brief Guy Maddin mention). The art and stories are simple but it's nice to see the variety of love shown here. Some stories are about the beginning of a relationship, some about the end and everything between.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    One of the most beautiful creations I've laid eyes on this year. One of the most beautiful creations I've laid eyes on this year.

  14. 4 out of 5

    BlurryBug

    This was a selection of short stories all about relationships and I want a full book of most of them. Short stories are rarely enough for my curious self it doesn't mean it wasn't satisfying or a good read it just means I wanted more. I cant fault the book for being what it is. so therefore 4,5 star is the right rating for me. I loved the diversity of colour, genders and ability in this book. I feel like it is easy to find someone recognise themselves by in this book. This was a selection of short stories all about relationships and I want a full book of most of them. Short stories are rarely enough for my curious self it doesn't mean it wasn't satisfying or a good read it just means I wanted more. I cant fault the book for being what it is. so therefore 4,5 star is the right rating for me. I loved the diversity of colour, genders and ability in this book. I feel like it is easy to find someone recognise themselves by in this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Assh Albinson

    Beautiful vignettes about love from different angles aspects, whether it be at the cusp, in the middle or even the end of the affair. This book doesn't focus exclusively on cis/hetero love either, instead crossing over gender, ethnicity, as well as monogamy and polyamory. Really great collection. Beautiful vignettes about love from different angles aspects, whether it be at the cusp, in the middle or even the end of the affair. This book doesn't focus exclusively on cis/hetero love either, instead crossing over gender, ethnicity, as well as monogamy and polyamory. Really great collection.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carrian Troxler

    3.5 stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    This was such a beautiful, enjoyable read. A collection of 21 vingettes depicting snippets of queer love.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    isn't it lovely to find a kindred? isn't it lovely to find a kindred?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Gordon

    Body Music is a series of vignettes about love in a variety of forms. The people who love come in all different forms, race, ability, sexuality, and gender all explored, and they experience a multitude of feelings and emotions. There's no one story, just snapshots meant to encapsulate a moment in time. This is a gorgeous, heartwarming (and sometimes breaking) book that left me with a feeling of breathlessness. Plus it is set in Montreal which is always a plus for me :D Body Music is a series of vignettes about love in a variety of forms. The people who love come in all different forms, race, ability, sexuality, and gender all explored, and they experience a multitude of feelings and emotions. There's no one story, just snapshots meant to encapsulate a moment in time. This is a gorgeous, heartwarming (and sometimes breaking) book that left me with a feeling of breathlessness. Plus it is set in Montreal which is always a plus for me :D

  20. 4 out of 5

    George K. Ilsley

    A collection of short vignettes each involving different characters. We dip into people's lives, and them dash off again. Wide variety of characters. Certainly this book leaves you wanting more. A collection of short vignettes each involving different characters. We dip into people's lives, and them dash off again. Wide variety of characters. Certainly this book leaves you wanting more.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Garfias Chan

    Some of the most beautiful writing and artwork I have read. I recommend this story 150%. I would rate it a six if I could!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Glenn

    Not what I’d usually pick up and read but am glad I did. A beautiful piece of art.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Z

    In bookstores I always go to the graphic novels section. Maybe it’s because I'm a visual artist and enjoy seeing artists work; maybe it’s just because I like pretty pictures. The only thing that’s annoying for me is that in mainstream graphic novels I usually don't feel represented. So to see a beautiful graphic novel that presents the LGBTQIA+ in a human light, the book that I have seen do this in the way that seems most respectful is Body Music. Body Music is a collection of short stories that In bookstores I always go to the graphic novels section. Maybe it’s because I'm a visual artist and enjoy seeing artists work; maybe it’s just because I like pretty pictures. The only thing that’s annoying for me is that in mainstream graphic novels I usually don't feel represented. So to see a beautiful graphic novel that presents the LGBTQIA+ in a human light, the book that I have seen do this in the way that seems most respectful is Body Music. Body Music is a collection of short stories that show us the love lives of some people in Montreal, most of whom are queer. Some of the most interesting stories, to my suprise, had nothing to do with queerness. My favorite story in the entirety of the book is towards the end, and is called “On the Importance of Laughter.” “On the Importance of Laughter” is about a rocky relationship between a mother and her son. The story picks up the characters right the dad’s death and they didn't care that much for each other latter on. As bleak as it sounds, the thing that lets this story be really interesting instead of a huge tear jerker is the emphasis on the good times that the mom and the dad had while still being realistic about the circumstance that their relationship ended in. That idea of realistic optimism is the thing that also makes my other favorite story in the book pop. The story is called On Mount Royal: Our Lives Together. This story centers a childhood romance that has been put on hold by distance, and we see the two parties reunite in a park. We follow the protagonist as she comes out as female to the other partner. This is by far my favorite story one because of how sweet it is but also how beautiful it is to have the protagonist be a trans feminine young person and have that both be the focus of the story but also the be about youth and capturing that feeling of youth. The artwork is very subtle and impactful throughout the entirety of the book. It complements the themes of the book in a way where all of the setting heavy and landscape shots are much more realistic, whereas all the figures maintain the same sort exaggerated eyes and noses. Maybe this is to keep them more as caricatures based on people and not super unique characters. Body Music is great read that I really enjoyed. That being said, it’s not for everyone, a healthy amount of it is very sexual, and it being a graphic novel means that lots of that happens “on screen”. But beyond that the book is a wonderful romp through love and relationships in an honest and REALLY sweet manner.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Body Music is the sort of project that's hard to place in one category. It's a series of vignettes, some connected, some not. Some of the stories are romantic, some are decidedly not. Some of the stories are queer, some are straight, some are monogamous, some are polyamorous. Some of the stories are really quite short, a couple meander around a bit. What ties them together? Love. The book opens with a story about two men who've been on a single, not-so-great, date. They're both obsessing about wha Body Music is the sort of project that's hard to place in one category. It's a series of vignettes, some connected, some not. Some of the stories are romantic, some are decidedly not. Some of the stories are queer, some are straight, some are monogamous, some are polyamorous. Some of the stories are really quite short, a couple meander around a bit. What ties them together? Love. The book opens with a story about two men who've been on a single, not-so-great, date. They're both obsessing about what they could have done differently, how they judged the other man too harshly, and should they call/text. In the end, they both delete the contact from their phones and go on about their solitary existence. A story close to the end of the book is about a middle-aged lesbian couple in bed, listening to the cat meow about breakfast. Through their little bits of dialogue, we learn of their long life together, raising children, and this cat as a birthday present. It's sweet and then very funny. A very "we've been through it all" story. There's a story about a throuple forming, and another about a man visiting two of his friends who are polyamorous and the two men disagreeing about monogamy. In the end, nothing is presented as the one true way, but rather Maroh treats her subjects gently and gives them space to shape their lives and their relationships as they see fit. There are trans characters, disabled characters, and a woman who chooses to give her gods her sight in exchange for the man she loves coming back to her. There are stories that end happily, stories that end unhappily, and stories that don't end at all. One early story, which features a mother and her son, is about the mother watching two people in the park below passing each other by. She wonders if you can see a first kiss before it happens. Later in the book, that same mother and son go through the son's father's old cassettes and mourn a love gone by. They dance and remember and laugh. It's sweet and sad and very human. Body Music is beautiful, not so much because it's a groundbreaking work of heartwrenching drama like Blue is the Warmest Color, but because love is beautiful and tragic and wonderful and this book is about all of the ways we experience or don't experience it. More reviews at www.loveinpanels.com!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Julie Maroh’s graphic novel Body Music is composed of 21 short stories about loving on the fringes. Set in Montreal, the vignettes are placed in somewhat chronological order, beginning with first meetings and ending with death and breakups. Her characters are diverse, and their stories even more so—she represents queer love, interracial love, polyamorous love, platonic love. I found the illustrations to be gorgeous, though they are largely monochromatic. On the whole, her portrayal of differentl Julie Maroh’s graphic novel Body Music is composed of 21 short stories about loving on the fringes. Set in Montreal, the vignettes are placed in somewhat chronological order, beginning with first meetings and ending with death and breakups. Her characters are diverse, and their stories even more so—she represents queer love, interracial love, polyamorous love, platonic love. I found the illustrations to be gorgeous, though they are largely monochromatic. On the whole, her portrayal of differently shaped and marked bodies is believable and recognizable; readers can certainly find their friends, acquaintances and possibly even themselves in here. I must say that I read the French translation to English, and unfortunately I do think some things are lost in this translation. For the most part I only noticed small fluency issues that chopped up the dialogue in strange ways, but occasionally these issues took me out of the narrative. Additionally, the vignettes vary significantly in tone, and I found that I didn’t always connect with the characters. This is likely simply a matter of personal preference, but with such short stories, there is very little time to really dig into these people’s worlds.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    This is a beautiful set of short stories about relationships and love. Set in Montreal the stories provide a glimpse into the realities of different relationships. In one story a woman grapples with ill health and affairs, while her husband stands supportively by, in another two gay deaf men use sign language to discuss their commitment to each other, in another a woman in a wheelchair comes to terms with the fact that she has promised to give her girlfriend space and the stories go on, each dee This is a beautiful set of short stories about relationships and love. Set in Montreal the stories provide a glimpse into the realities of different relationships. In one story a woman grapples with ill health and affairs, while her husband stands supportively by, in another two gay deaf men use sign language to discuss their commitment to each other, in another a woman in a wheelchair comes to terms with the fact that she has promised to give her girlfriend space and the stories go on, each deeply emotive but yet gentle in the way the story is told through the illustrations. Each story provides a quick but very meaningful glimpse into the different relationship. The reader is invited to see what is happening but doesn't get to see what happens in the long term. The stories embrace the imagination of the reader as we think about what may come. The artwork is in subtle dark colours and the drawings are superb. I also enjoyed the diversity of the people and the diversity of the kinds of relationships. This is a brilliant volume of stories and I am so glad I had a chance to review it. Copy provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an unbiased review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maïlys

    It's the third time i've read, the two previous times i had read it in french, i wanted to see what it was like when translated. First of all, i'm going to speak about my experience reading it in its original language, which is french (and also happens to be my native language) I was really moved by this graphic novel, i think we can really identify to the different stories/characters. Love and relationships are, indeed, a universal topic :) The drawings are great and that's one of the things i lo It's the third time i've read, the two previous times i had read it in french, i wanted to see what it was like when translated. First of all, i'm going to speak about my experience reading it in its original language, which is french (and also happens to be my native language) I was really moved by this graphic novel, i think we can really identify to the different stories/characters. Love and relationships are, indeed, a universal topic :) The drawings are great and that's one of the things i love most about Julie Maroh's work :) I enjoyed and actually noted down a few quotes as well, which really resonated :) I think that's when my experience reading it in english was a bit different. I was more touched by the words in french and the quotes clicked more. I don't know if it's because the original work is in french or because my language is french, might be a combination of both. Anyway, it's still a great and touching graphic novel, and it certainly won't be my last time reading it. I think i get something different out of it every time i read it, because i gained new experiences along the way.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Blue

    Julie Maroh's graphic story collection is a series of vignettes that depict many forms of body identity, gender identity, relationships, love, lust, and desire. There is surprisingly very little about family in the context of all of these issues, which most likely is a generational thing. The stories are so doggedly focused on non-heterosexual, non-conformist people and relationships that it makes Montreal seem like the queerest place on the planet (and having been there I can say that it most c Julie Maroh's graphic story collection is a series of vignettes that depict many forms of body identity, gender identity, relationships, love, lust, and desire. There is surprisingly very little about family in the context of all of these issues, which most likely is a generational thing. The stories are so doggedly focused on non-heterosexual, non-conformist people and relationships that it makes Montreal seem like the queerest place on the planet (and having been there I can say that it most certainly is NOT; like most big cities all kinds exist with a low humm and grumble). The inclusion of differently abled people, polyamory, and sickness makes the collection a cut above the generic all-inclusive examination of love and lust and the human condition. Maroh's art is evocative and beautiful; she can easily draw supernatural beings as well as hyper-real people. Her landscapes and cityscapes make the city come alive on the page. Recommended for those who love dogs, snow, political arguments in the Roman times, mix tapes, biking, and sign language.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sara Fernández

    I loved this book visually, Julie Maroh is such a talented artist. The details on every vignette are amazing, I spent a few minutes per page just enjoying the little things of every drawing: the sleepy cat in the couch, the computer sitting on the kitchen table, the beautiful Montreal backgrounds... I had the same thought as with Blue is the warmest color, her illustrations made me feel joy, sadness, anger, peace... her drawings make you FEEL, I don't think that's easy. What I also loved (and thi I loved this book visually, Julie Maroh is such a talented artist. The details on every vignette are amazing, I spent a few minutes per page just enjoying the little things of every drawing: the sleepy cat in the couch, the computer sitting on the kitchen table, the beautiful Montreal backgrounds... I had the same thought as with Blue is the warmest color, her illustrations made me feel joy, sadness, anger, peace... her drawings make you FEEL, I don't think that's easy. What I also loved (and think it's even more important) is the subject of the book. I am so happy she focuses on the LGBTQ community, we need visibility and the idea of making a book of short LGBTQ love stories is brilliant, and necessary. You need more to get to know a character or understand certain stories though, but I understand Julie's idea was to just show a glimpse of those lives. Nothing more, nothing less. And in general, to me it's sufficient, that's the beauty of it. You catch a glimpse of those stories, and imagine the rest. I read the English version "Body Music" and I guess some things get lost in translation.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    A thoughtful, touching, intuitive graphic novel that explores every facet of love, and how it is expressed between different people. This graphic novel is structured like a short story collection, with each new chapter bringing a new set of characters and story. I really enjoyed this structure since it allowed us to explore a variety of different situations and characters. Even though many of the chapters were very short, some lacking even simple dialogue, they still packed a punch, and I am lef A thoughtful, touching, intuitive graphic novel that explores every facet of love, and how it is expressed between different people. This graphic novel is structured like a short story collection, with each new chapter bringing a new set of characters and story. I really enjoyed this structure since it allowed us to explore a variety of different situations and characters. Even though many of the chapters were very short, some lacking even simple dialogue, they still packed a punch, and I am left with a lot to think about after finishing this graphic novel. Maroh's art style is also gorgeous--I really enjoyed the traditional style of each page (charcoal, pencil), and how everything looked handmade. I am excited for this to be published, and for more stories of LGBTQ love and relationships to be available to all readers. Thank you to Edelweiss and Arsenal Pulp Press for providing me with an advanced readers edition!

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