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Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education have long persisted alongside colonial models of education, yet too often have been subsumed within the fields of multiculturalism, critical race theory, and progressive education. Timely and compelling, Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education features research, theory, and dynamic foundational readings for edu Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education have long persisted alongside colonial models of education, yet too often have been subsumed within the fields of multiculturalism, critical race theory, and progressive education. Timely and compelling, Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education features research, theory, and dynamic foundational readings for educators and educational researchers who are looking for possibilities beyond the limits of liberal democratic schooling. Featuring original chapters by authors at the forefront of theorizing, practice, research, and activism, this volume helps define and imagine the exciting interstices between Indigenous and decolonizing studies and education. Each chapter forwards Indigenous principles - such as Land as literacy and water as life - that are grounded in place-specific efforts of creating Indigenous universities and schools, community organizing and social movements, trans and Two Spirit practices, refusals of state policies, and land-based and water-based pedagogies.


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Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education have long persisted alongside colonial models of education, yet too often have been subsumed within the fields of multiculturalism, critical race theory, and progressive education. Timely and compelling, Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education features research, theory, and dynamic foundational readings for edu Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education have long persisted alongside colonial models of education, yet too often have been subsumed within the fields of multiculturalism, critical race theory, and progressive education. Timely and compelling, Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education features research, theory, and dynamic foundational readings for educators and educational researchers who are looking for possibilities beyond the limits of liberal democratic schooling. Featuring original chapters by authors at the forefront of theorizing, practice, research, and activism, this volume helps define and imagine the exciting interstices between Indigenous and decolonizing studies and education. Each chapter forwards Indigenous principles - such as Land as literacy and water as life - that are grounded in place-specific efforts of creating Indigenous universities and schools, community organizing and social movements, trans and Two Spirit practices, refusals of state policies, and land-based and water-based pedagogies.

53 review for Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education: Mapping the Long View

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Academic things often start off hard for me, because there is always this part where they are going over everything they are going to do, with so many references and it just drags. I knew as I slogged through the introduction that it was probably going to bet better (things usually do), but I had no idea how refreshing and invigorating this was going to be. The focus is largely on education, and so if you work in education or education administration this will probably resonate much more, but st Academic things often start off hard for me, because there is always this part where they are going over everything they are going to do, with so many references and it just drags. I knew as I slogged through the introduction that it was probably going to bet better (things usually do), but I had no idea how refreshing and invigorating this was going to be. The focus is largely on education, and so if you work in education or education administration this will probably resonate much more, but still there was so much good thought put into this. Even with the section on Indigenous Content Requirements by Adam Gaudry and Danielle E. Lorenz, which comes up with many potential and realistic problems, it is ultimately stimulating to know that issues can be identified, and solutions can be too. There are some wonderful initiatives happening, and people are working to improve. I appreciated new ways of looking at destruction, the word "decolonizing" and even modern. As some people have developed ways of learning that meet the needs of those in remote locations, there has been criticism that modern education is needed. Perhaps "modern" is not the right word for adapting to needs and resources to expand the spreading of knowledge, but then it is something better than modern. There are various spelling and grammar errors, probably related to many of the chapters being adapted from oral presentations.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Wong

    Book review of Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Eve Tuck, and K. Wayne Yang's (editors) Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education: Mapping the Long View (2018) This book collects in this volume what to many of the contributors are or would be a life's life-giving work of studies in education, with a key difference for the important ground it is breaking (or returning to) as well as acknowledging: land, water, ceremony, story, language, relation. It celebrates the work and research already begun in ind Book review of Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Eve Tuck, and K. Wayne Yang's (editors) Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education: Mapping the Long View (2018) This book collects in this volume what to many of the contributors are or would be a life's life-giving work of studies in education, with a key difference for the important ground it is breaking (or returning to) as well as acknowledging: land, water, ceremony, story, language, relation. It celebrates the work and research already begun in indigenous and decolonizing education. It also shares a claim of futurity in intriguing and promising areas while recognizing a wariness over how settler non-indigenous society will persist in racist attitudes and behaviours, in occupation, in erasure, in extinguishment, including in the university. The voices are as varied as the work and opportunities and challenges, unique in their own ways for the research project or primary concern at hand. Not to be missed is the intersectionality that is ever present and foregrounded, sometimes rich in generativity of new issues, and often flowing from an ethos of place and identity, as having an ethical bearing on relation. As academic work, the presentations in this collection are already highly intertextual and in fuller dialogue with each other and with other work in the field. The reader should not however miss the plum for want of shaking the tree. There is in fact underneath the scratch of the surface intertextuality a welter of deep context and "in real life" encounters and rendezvous among this and many other groups of researchers and interveners and advocates for indigenous and decolonizing education. I might call this the "paratextuality of advocacy" and I believe that it is surely the site of the work of education. The text of the book itself is after all functionally only an index or a pointer to this rich paratext which is always one that approaches its work with a completeness of mind and the animation of the heart of the warrior. The naive reader will come to this text usually unbidden by the spirits and bodies obtaining in the reading of the words, phrases, dialogues. What might happen though is an inhabiting. The verbs perform their moving and the reader imagines moving also with a developing understanding of what it is to heal, how, who and whom, and why. The engaged reader, whether already an educator or in allied disciplines or areas of concern, will perhaps take to the text his or her or their own context and paratext. Contributors to the book also center on a particular critical theory praxis or critique of the work which should be articulated if not exactly in text then in paratext. Furthermore, extensive notes and references in the book provide hypertextuality. Finally, the editors consider in the book's subtitle "mapping the long view". While I feel that the work is or should be immediate and already here, and not far into the long view, the editors certainly recognise this: the immensity of the work demands the long view because there are not many hands to do the immense work. And this is a problem also not helped by an indifferent or indeed hostile settler society. And because it is true that "the map is not the territory", this demi-title to the book then becomes ironic if we can accept that the territory pre-ontologised the map. Thus mere editors and publishers of text could be excused for instrumenting for the measure of feature sets when it could very well be a bug that bites to radicalise the work of indigenous and decolonising education.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This is an important and lucid collection that is essential reading for teachers working at all levels. The first chapter, "Literacies of Land: Decolonizing Narratives, Storying, and Literature" by Sandra Styres is the most explicitly applicable to college-level literature teaching, and is particularly useful for its sustained consideration of space, place, whiteness, and Land based pedagogy. I was particularly invested in Styres' interrogation of ways to challenge whitewashing mythologies (such This is an important and lucid collection that is essential reading for teachers working at all levels. The first chapter, "Literacies of Land: Decolonizing Narratives, Storying, and Literature" by Sandra Styres is the most explicitly applicable to college-level literature teaching, and is particularly useful for its sustained consideration of space, place, whiteness, and Land based pedagogy. I was particularly invested in Styres' interrogation of ways to challenge whitewashing mythologies (such as "Canada has no colonial legacy") without reliving the legacy of colonial violence ad nauseam. Although "Decolonizing Education Through Transdisciplinary Approaches to Climate Change Education" by Teresa Newberry and Octaviana V. Trujillo is specifically geared toward STEM educators, I found it to have great relevance to people working in the humanities as well. Transdisciplinary work in climate change education (i.e. environmental humanities) is on the rise, and transdisciplinary approaches there can also be innately decolonizing, as they also complicate not only the myth of a single truth, but also that of a single path to empathy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nate Madden

    So much to deeply reflect upon.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shauna

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    Emily Jean

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  10. 5 out of 5

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  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Micheletty

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

  13. 5 out of 5

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  14. 5 out of 5

    Estrella Sandoval

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Edward

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christy

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  18. 4 out of 5

    Sharadha Kalyanam

  19. 5 out of 5

    Claire Melanie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    371.829 I3994 2019

  22. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  23. 5 out of 5

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  24. 4 out of 5

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  25. 5 out of 5

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  28. 4 out of 5

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  29. 5 out of 5

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  30. 4 out of 5

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  31. 5 out of 5

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  33. 4 out of 5

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