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The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror is a collection of nine short stories that hew both to the earthy traditions and blaze new trails in Folk Horror. Fans of Folk Horror, as well as those unfamiliar with it, will find horrors galore in these stories. Themes of rural isolation and insularity, paranoia, mindless and monstrous ritual, as well as arcane cere The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror is a collection of nine short stories that hew both to the earthy traditions and blaze new trails in Folk Horror. Fans of Folk Horror, as well as those unfamiliar with it, will find horrors galore in these stories. Themes of rural isolation and insularity, paranoia, mindless and monstrous ritual, as well as arcane ceremonies clashing against modern preoccupations run through these stories. Nosetouch Press is proud to bring The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror to horror enthusiasts everywhere. FEATURING: Coy Hall | “Sire of the Hatchet” Sam Hicks | “Back Along the Old Track” Lindsay King-Miller | “The Fruit” Steve Toase | “The Jaws of Ouroboros” Eric J. Guignard | “The First Order of Whaleyville’s Divine Basilisk Handlers” Romey Petite | “Pumpkin, Dear” Stephanie Ellis | “The Way of the Mother” Zachary Von Houser | “Leave the Night” S.T. Gibson | “Revival”


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The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror is a collection of nine short stories that hew both to the earthy traditions and blaze new trails in Folk Horror. Fans of Folk Horror, as well as those unfamiliar with it, will find horrors galore in these stories. Themes of rural isolation and insularity, paranoia, mindless and monstrous ritual, as well as arcane cere The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror is a collection of nine short stories that hew both to the earthy traditions and blaze new trails in Folk Horror. Fans of Folk Horror, as well as those unfamiliar with it, will find horrors galore in these stories. Themes of rural isolation and insularity, paranoia, mindless and monstrous ritual, as well as arcane ceremonies clashing against modern preoccupations run through these stories. Nosetouch Press is proud to bring The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror to horror enthusiasts everywhere. FEATURING: Coy Hall | “Sire of the Hatchet” Sam Hicks | “Back Along the Old Track” Lindsay King-Miller | “The Fruit” Steve Toase | “The Jaws of Ouroboros” Eric J. Guignard | “The First Order of Whaleyville’s Divine Basilisk Handlers” Romey Petite | “Pumpkin, Dear” Stephanie Ellis | “The Way of the Mother” Zachary Von Houser | “Leave the Night” S.T. Gibson | “Revival”

30 review for The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (That's What She Read)

    4 stars I really enjoyed this collection of stories. I have wondered what technically falls into the "folk horror" definition, and these were all held together by a great atmosphere and "old world/ old ways" twist that I enjoyed. My favorites were: The Fruit by Lindsay King-Miller, "The Way of the Mother" by Stephanie Ellis, and "Sire of the Hatchet" by Coy Hall. There were a few authors in here I hadn't heard of, but hope to see more from in the future. Recommend for people who are interested in 4 stars I really enjoyed this collection of stories. I have wondered what technically falls into the "folk horror" definition, and these were all held together by a great atmosphere and "old world/ old ways" twist that I enjoyed. My favorites were: The Fruit by Lindsay King-Miller, "The Way of the Mother" by Stephanie Ellis, and "Sire of the Hatchet" by Coy Hall. There were a few authors in here I hadn't heard of, but hope to see more from in the future. Recommend for people who are interested in folk horror. A perfect time to read this would be during "harvest season."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I absolutely loved this anthology. I was often left feeling like I needed more story - they were too short, I wanted more! - and that's fantastic. Creepy, strange, unexpected, and bizarre. Definitely looking up more by each of these authors!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mindi

    This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I cannot get enough of horror folklore. I think I've read more folklore this year than ever, and I still want more. There's just something so appealing about stories that have been passed down through generations of people. And this anthology does an amazing job of playing with the genre and adding a modern touch to traditional folktales. The absolute standout for me was The Fruit by Lindsay King-Miller. Every year people This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I cannot get enough of horror folklore. I think I've read more folklore this year than ever, and I still want more. There's just something so appealing about stories that have been passed down through generations of people. And this anthology does an amazing job of playing with the genre and adding a modern touch to traditional folktales. The absolute standout for me was The Fruit by Lindsay King-Miller. Every year people are summoned to the orchards at Genesis Farms to harvest the fruit. The people come to work not for money but out of obligation. Ada and Evelyn answer the call with the rest of the town, but Evelyn insists that her wife stays on the ground and holds the ladder so that she won't have to do the picking. They are cautious because the trees are dangerous. Sometimes the fruit whispers if you get close enough. And you never want to touch the trees or the fruit with your bare hands. Evelyn and Ada are careful, but one mistake is all it takes to turn their lives upside down. Sire of the Hatchet by Coy Hall is about two executioners who find something disturbing in the woods on the way to an execution. The village of Strattonwick has a witch that has been sentenced to death, but before the men can see to her execution, they learn something unexplainable about the people of Strattonwick. Something that will change how they deal with the woman people call a witch. The Jaws of the Ouroboros by Steve Toase is unlike any story I've read before. Two young men supply a powerful drug dealer with an very unusual and hard to obtain drug. When one of them tries to stop living a life of murder and crime, the drug kingpin sets out to find him and bring him back. Pumpkin, Dear by Romey Petite is about an unfaithful wife who comes back from the dead. At first her husband adjusts to the idea of her return, but the wife ultimately has a plan for the person who cut off her head. And the last story I'll mention is unique. The Way of the Mother by Stephanie Ellis is a tale about a town that refuses to live with the advancements of the modern day. However, someone is always weak to the lure of technology, and the town must pay a debt in blood to keep the modern world from encroaching. This seems like such a likely scenario, and the way the town pushes out the modern world is truly gruesome and fascinating. This is a fantastic collection of folk horror. I'm definitely interested in finding other works from these authors. These stories are a solid and disturbing collection of folktales. I recommend this one to anyone who enjoys dark folklore.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    "No one ever leaves. Harvesting is terrible. Not harvesting would be worse." - Lindsay King-Miller The Fiends in the Furrows is a folk horror anthology from Nosetouch Press. There were 9 stories in here, and I had so much fun reading them! Yesterday I was listening to the Ladies of Horror Fiction Podcast, and Gwendolyn Kiste was on as a special guest to talk about women horror authors and folk horror with the host, Toni from Misadventures of a Reader. They were talking about how folk horror is un "No one ever leaves. Harvesting is terrible. Not harvesting would be worse." - Lindsay King-Miller The Fiends in the Furrows is a folk horror anthology from Nosetouch Press. There were 9 stories in here, and I had so much fun reading them! Yesterday I was listening to the Ladies of Horror Fiction Podcast, and Gwendolyn Kiste was on as a special guest to talk about women horror authors and folk horror with the host, Toni from Misadventures of a Reader. They were talking about how folk horror is unique because the storylines tend to be religion-focused, but the religions are a wide range - they tend to either be intensely rule-based Protestant, charismatic, or pagan. This variety was present within this anthology, and I think it's interesting that many different religions can be involved in horror stories. I really enjoyed reading stories from different authors. I had not read anything from these authors before, and I appreciate that I was introduced to so many I hadn't read. My top 3 stories were The Fruit by Lindsay King-Miller, The Jaws of Ouroboros by Steve Toase, and The First Order of Whaleyville's Divine Basilisk Handlers by Eric J. Guignard. These three were were very entertaining and unique, and I could have read full novels of any of them. I liked that the anthology was a good mix of women and men writers. This book was full of unsettling and detailed stories, and I'm so glad I had the chance to read it. Thank you so much to Nosetouch Press for sending this one!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sheldon Compton

    Precise rating - 3.75. Some editing issues with line edits, etc., which puts me off a little. However, the imaginative power contained in each story, that nice, folk horror narrative thrust, brings up the 3 star. It was a fun read, and definitely worth checking out if you like this kind of horror.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Yes, I have a vested interest - my story is included BUT I loved the other stories. Earth-bound bodies, man-eating stone circles, the snakes of revivalists and pumpkin-headed revenants all portray the glory that is folk horror. Proud to be part of this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mikki

    I generally avoid most horror. But I gave this one a chance because of a vested interest in a friend's story published within this anthology. I learned that I like folk horror. Surprise, surprise. I particularly loved Coy Hall's "Sire of the Hatchet," Lindsay King-Miller's "The Fruit," Stephanie Ellis's "The Way of the Mother," and S.T. Gibson's "Revival." Overall, an interesting collection. Dark, delicious, perfect reading for the decaying seasons and in anticipation of Halloween. I'd liken it to I generally avoid most horror. But I gave this one a chance because of a vested interest in a friend's story published within this anthology. I learned that I like folk horror. Surprise, surprise. I particularly loved Coy Hall's "Sire of the Hatchet," Lindsay King-Miller's "The Fruit," Stephanie Ellis's "The Way of the Mother," and S.T. Gibson's "Revival." Overall, an interesting collection. Dark, delicious, perfect reading for the decaying seasons and in anticipation of Halloween. I'd liken it to bitter coffee and salted chocolate with almond slices.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Holly Heckart

    I loved every story! I think I may have found a new genre to add to my list of favorites. I'll definitely be keeping up with these authors. \

  9. 4 out of 5

    Suvi

    Folk horror is an interesting offshoot of horror, one that I can't call my favorite just yet but which has left me intrigued and wondering if there's something there. When I had just re-watched The Wicker Man, I stumbled into this collection of contemporary folk horror stories, so I had to get it of course (just a little over 4 dollars on Amazon and even less in euros; not much to lose). The standout was Lindsay King-Miller's The Fruit, featuring dangerous whispering fruit trees, but other than t Folk horror is an interesting offshoot of horror, one that I can't call my favorite just yet but which has left me intrigued and wondering if there's something there. When I had just re-watched The Wicker Man, I stumbled into this collection of contemporary folk horror stories, so I had to get it of course (just a little over 4 dollars on Amazon and even less in euros; not much to lose). The standout was Lindsay King-Miller's The Fruit, featuring dangerous whispering fruit trees, but other than that the collection left me underwhelmed. I liked the overall rustic mood, but I like to evaluate anthologies in terms of whether I want to read more from the authors, and none of these made the cut. Great for the fall season for sure, but not something that gets me really excited.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I think my favourite was the opening story, The Sire Of The Hatchet.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    We’ve had a lot of talk about Folk Horror lately with Midsommar and Apostle, so it feels right that we’d get an anthology exploring the genre. I still think it’s a genre basically in its infancy, neglected since the canonical trio of British films. Hopefully its potential is starting to dawn on people. Fiends in the Furrows easily escapes the main trap the genre has pigeonholed itself into: it doesn’t include a single story about an outsider becoming a human sacrifice! In fact, the diversity of We’ve had a lot of talk about Folk Horror lately with Midsommar and Apostle, so it feels right that we’d get an anthology exploring the genre. I still think it’s a genre basically in its infancy, neglected since the canonical trio of British films. Hopefully its potential is starting to dawn on people. Fiends in the Furrows easily escapes the main trap the genre has pigeonholed itself into: it doesn’t include a single story about an outsider becoming a human sacrifice! In fact, the diversity of stories on display here kind of surprised me. Most of them do fit into the range of what you might expect: historical settings, rural villages, presumably British, and a heavy emphasis on plants and fertility. More of them than I expected create secondary worlds or dramatic, intrusive fantasy changes to the real world, providing a nice contrast from the subtle, creeping historical horror most of them choose. It’s a mixed bag like any anthology, but considering I hadn’t come across a single one of these writers before, it was an impressively consistently competent mix. None of them feel really amateurish or mediocre, they all have some strong and creative ideas. Not all of the styles are too my taste, but they mostly deliver on the styles they attempt. On the flip side, none of them really wowed me with concept or execution. If pressed, I’d say the two snake stories, “First Order of Whaleyville” and “Revival,” stand out, along with “Pumpkin, Dear.” But the range of quality is unusually narrow overall. Anyway, if you’re interested, I don’t think you’ll leave this one disappointed. I still think there’s a lot of ground left for this genre to cover. The concept as I understand it encompasses the old, traditional relationships between agrarian societies and the ecosystems they inhabit, all the strange habits and notions they develop to cope with an enormously varied set of threats and opportunities. At the moment, the “folk” in folk horror is still a narrow and somewhat generic notion; diving into the specifics of the enormous breadth of rural life in human history offers a huge unexplored landscape of horror ideas.

  12. 5 out of 5

    A.

    Well, this was one h*ll of a mixed bag. The Fruit (Lindsay King-Miller) and The Jaws of Ouroboros (Steve Toase) are the stand-outs here. The Fruit touches on parenting and child-bearing for lesbians through the lens of some stellar, dream-like horror; if pregnancy horror freaks you out, then you might want to skip this one. In contrast, The Jaws of Ouroboros is a fairly straightforward crime story transformed by its setting (standing stone circles are the teeth of giant grinding pits) into somet Well, this was one h*ll of a mixed bag. The Fruit (Lindsay King-Miller) and The Jaws of Ouroboros (Steve Toase) are the stand-outs here. The Fruit touches on parenting and child-bearing for lesbians through the lens of some stellar, dream-like horror; if pregnancy horror freaks you out, then you might want to skip this one. In contrast, The Jaws of Ouroboros is a fairly straightforward crime story transformed by its setting (standing stone circles are the teeth of giant grinding pits) into something truly weird. While the beats of its ending are familiar, the particulars elevate it. The rest of the stories range from quite nice (The Sire of the Hatchet by Coy Hall, Revival by S.T. Gibson) to all right to, well, then there's Pumpkin, Dear (Romey Petite). The central conceit of Pumpkin, Dear is interesting. The execution, not so much. I might reread The Fruit or The Jaws of Ouroboros but otherwise I don't imagine I'll go through this one again. It's cheering to see an anthology dedicated to folk horror, a personal genre favorite. I just wish the quality were more consistent.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alyson Rhodes

    The Fiends in the Furrows is the latest horror anthology from indie publisher Nosetouch Press (published September 2018). It contains 9 tales of folk horror (film wise think ‘Wicker Man’ crossed with ‘The Witch’). Within these pages haunted landscapes, isolated rural communities with pagan traditions, occult practises and the power of preachers jostle side by side with modern life - which often loses, or indeed has no relevance in these stories. This book would be an ideal purchase for this bleak The Fiends in the Furrows is the latest horror anthology from indie publisher Nosetouch Press (published September 2018). It contains 9 tales of folk horror (film wise think ‘Wicker Man’ crossed with ‘The Witch’). Within these pages haunted landscapes, isolated rural communities with pagan traditions, occult practises and the power of preachers jostle side by side with modern life - which often loses, or indeed has no relevance in these stories. This book would be an ideal purchase for this bleak autumnal time of year where Halloween dominates and the countdown to Christmas has started. So if you’d like a gift for a bibliophile who loves horror then buy this one. All the stories are well written, with huge gobbets of terror and weirdness running through their veins. With nine to choose from, you can sample taste from a literary buffet of varied writers’ voices and styles, as each one elegantly creates their own fictional world with its own boundaries into which you, the reader, can step inside, visit and unlike some of the characters trapped within, you are allowed to leave. This is quite a privilege. If I had to pick a couple which stood out for me- well here goes- but I enjoyed all nine:- S.T.Gibson’s ‘Revival’ - be warned if you have a snake phobia best to skip this one. This is a powerful account of a young girl’s coming of age within her twisted pastor’s family patriarchy and the power of religious hysteria in a small community. Stephanie Ellis’ ‘The Way of the Mother’- again it will put you off moving to a village for a better quality of life! Mothers are expected to make sacrifices for their families, aren’t they? Here a community condones and accepts in silence an horrific act - though there is beauty too in the new creation. Third shout out to Sam Hicks’ ‘Back Along the Old Track’- this really creeped me out, reading it late at night. A feral fearsome farming family terrorise a new arrival in the village, who has to learn the olde ways pretty fast. Highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    B.

    I love folk horror. Between Weird and Folk, I cant decide which type of horror lit I enjoy best....however, this particular anthology just really didn’t do it for me. I find Laird Barron to be one of the greatest weird and folk horror writers alive, so I guess my expectations were set really high for these authors. In the end, these stories dragged on and were just not really satisfying, in my humble opinion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    A really fun read. 9 stories, 5 of which I thought were really excellent.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This is the perfect read or gift for someone who gets a little too into fall. By nature of the beast, the stories are so rooted in our recent human history that a strange comfort accompanies any chill down the reader's spine. Especially enjoyed S. T. Gibson's contribution.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karl Drinkwater

    I'm a fan of folk horror. No surprise, since my first novel is sometimes categorised as that. The stories at the start of this collection were strong enough to grip me and keep me going. As with any collection, the quality and personal interest varies. These were the three standouts for me. Coy Hall “Sire of the Hatchet” The good, understated writing, pulled me in; the creepy setting and sense of ominous powers kept me going. The conclusion to this polished and effective story was fitting. It was I'm a fan of folk horror. No surprise, since my first novel is sometimes categorised as that. The stories at the start of this collection were strong enough to grip me and keep me going. As with any collection, the quality and personal interest varies. These were the three standouts for me. Coy Hall “Sire of the Hatchet” The good, understated writing, pulled me in; the creepy setting and sense of ominous powers kept me going. The conclusion to this polished and effective story was fitting. It was a great example of the genre to open the collection with. Lindsay King-Miller “The Fruit” I read so much that it's hard for anything to seem fresh. This story did, though. I was pulled in and fascinated by the world building, the way things are subtly reversed so the comforting becomes threatening. First class work. Steve Toase “The Jaws of Ouroboros” This was a nice shift into a mix of outworld horror and post-apocalyptic criminality. Sometimes when an author doesn't explain everything it comes across as a failure of imagination, but here I could accept it as tired people in a tired world and it totally worked. Those three authors impressed me enough to keep an eye on their other works. The collection was generally well edited - a few typos here and there (not in all of the stories), and one slightly annoying punctuation error gets repeated (using a single open quote instead of an apostrophe for truncation at the start of a word), but otherwise I'd say if you like the idea of folk horror, give this collection a try.

  18. 5 out of 5

    C.W. Blackwell

    Reading The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror is like finding some ancient confession sprawled on inquisition parchment -- a dark and mesmerizing account of oddities long forgotten. Like something whispered in the cornfield. Or a tree root curling over your toes in a corner of the woods no one remembers how to find anymore. This collection knocks the dust off these frightening fables and reacquaints us with their horrors. And once rediscovered, the old horrors awaken in our mind Reading The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror is like finding some ancient confession sprawled on inquisition parchment -- a dark and mesmerizing account of oddities long forgotten. Like something whispered in the cornfield. Or a tree root curling over your toes in a corner of the woods no one remembers how to find anymore. This collection knocks the dust off these frightening fables and reacquaints us with their horrors. And once rediscovered, the old horrors awaken in our minds to invade our imaginations. A highly recommended read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristian Dobson

    A mixed bag as you can expect with an anthology collection. The Fruit is by far the standout story though. Weird, original, and left me wanting more. Ratings for all the stories: Sire of the Hatchet 4/5 Back Along the Old Track 4/5 The Fruit 5/5 The Jaws of Ouroboros 2/5 The First Order of Whaleyville's Divine Basilisk Handlers 4/5 Pumpkin, Dear 3/5 The Way of the Mother 2/5 Leave the Night 2/5 Revival 2/5

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Two young men working as a team supply a vicious drug dealer with a potent and difficult to come by drug. When one of them tries to go back on the straight and narrow path, his former boss is determined to find him and bring him back. Every year the people of the town are summoned to harvest the fruit at Genesis Farms. They do not know what kind of fruit it is they are gathering, nor do they know where it eventually goes. All any one knows is that they must go; and not for the money but becau Two young men working as a team supply a vicious drug dealer with a potent and difficult to come by drug. When one of them tries to go back on the straight and narrow path, his former boss is determined to find him and bring him back. Every year the people of the town are summoned to harvest the fruit at Genesis Farms. They do not know what kind of fruit it is they are gathering, nor do they know where it eventually goes. All any one knows is that they must go; and not for the money but because they are obligated to. An unfaithful wife returns from the grave and to her husband’s side. The only issue is that she is missing her head as her husband had sliced it off the night before. These are but three of the stories included in The Fiends in the Furrows: An Anthology of Folk Horror. Each of the nine stories seems stranger than the last and each touches on a variety of themes. From the paranoia that sometimes arises from rural isolation to the monstrous rituals and arcane ceremonies that are handed down generation to generation. Personally, I love a good horror and the ones featured in The Fiends in the Furrows were right up my alley. While there is a bit of violence, the stories tend to rely more on psychological horror than physical horror. In this way they remind me of many a foreign horror film. Most (but certainly not all) American horror films rely on blood and gore, on jump scares and other visual signs to try and scare the audience. Foreign horror films on the other hand (again, not all), tend to rely on the psychological. They play with your mind, showing only hints and shadows, making one wonder what is was exactly that they saw. So it is with the stories in this book. Very little is laid out concrete for the reader. Instead, most things are hinted at, leaving the reader to fill in the details with their own imagination. Leaving them to finish the story and decide what exactly happens next. I was not familiar with any of the authors features in this collection but that does not mean I did not enjoy them. Each brought their own unique flavor of storytelling and was able to add to the tapestry that is this enthralling book. Reading who love a good page turner and who enjoy thinking about what happens next will surely devour this book just as I have done.

  21. 4 out of 5

    J.B.

    I am a huge fan of anthologies because sometimes I'm not ready to fully commit to one story for an entire book-one of the draw backs of a short attention span. I am also a huge fan of folk horror so when I came upon this book I was ecstatic. The book includes 9 short folk horror stories I found pleasantly enjoyable. Folk horror isn't necessarily horror to me but is rather remnants of long held stories and traditions that have made it into today's society. A lot of folk horror takes you back to O I am a huge fan of anthologies because sometimes I'm not ready to fully commit to one story for an entire book-one of the draw backs of a short attention span. I am also a huge fan of folk horror so when I came upon this book I was ecstatic. The book includes 9 short folk horror stories I found pleasantly enjoyable. Folk horror isn't necessarily horror to me but is rather remnants of long held stories and traditions that have made it into today's society. A lot of folk horror takes you back to Old World living and embraces the daily fears and anxieties that real people held in a time long past. As someone who comes from rural Appalachia a lot of folk horror stories are familiar in origin and at times soothing in their ability to conjure memories of stories told from childhood. Granted folk horror comes from the imagination and talent of the author who writes it but most stories have roots in folklore that has traveled through the ages. Six of the nine stories in this collection I feel really captured the essence of "folk", three I feel were outstanding... "Sire of the Hatchet" by Coy Hall-It is my opinion you can not get any better than this short story. The book opening with this gem was brilliant and set the atmosphere for the others to follow. "The Way of the Mother" by Stephanie Ellis-This should be a full length novel, I was devastated when this story ended. There is so much that is right about this story and from start to finish this was absolute folk horror. The author did a fantastic job and I was extremely impressed with every word of this story. Out of the nine stories in this anthology this was my favorite. "Revival" by S.T. Gibson-Although on the short side it went straight to the point; setting, characters and lessons learned were on point as well as ATMOSPHERE (I can't say it enough; ATMOSPHERE is so important in folk horror) and it was weaved into an extraordinary little tale. The remaining stories were all very good, "Back Along the Old Track" by Sam Hicks was a reread for me since it was featured in I believe volume 11 of The Best of The Best Horror (please don't quote me on the volume), "The Fruit" by Lindsay King-Miller was near and dear because of the focus on a same sex relationship which is an ongoing struggle for the fantastic men and women who unfortunately have to endure atrocities everyday during daily life. I love the inclusion of this story in this collection. "The Jaws of Ouroboros" by Steve Toase is probably one of the weirdest stories I have read to date, very imaginative and exceptional talent. The remaining stories were enjoyable but to me fell short of being actual folk horror (only my opinion though, please don't let that keep you from reading them). Overall I really enjoyed this collection and I will be looking into some of the included authors other works.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christa

    There are books you read as a writer that make you want to throw down your pen and never write again because you'll never match the level of brilliance you've just read. Then there are books that make you want to up your game. THE FIENDS IN THE FURROWS is one of the latter, a folk horror collection that recalls the best of the genre with subtle twists that speak deeply to the human condition. Particular favorites of mine included: - Lindsay King-Miller (no relation)'s "The Fruit" for its depictio There are books you read as a writer that make you want to throw down your pen and never write again because you'll never match the level of brilliance you've just read. Then there are books that make you want to up your game. THE FIENDS IN THE FURROWS is one of the latter, a folk horror collection that recalls the best of the genre with subtle twists that speak deeply to the human condition. Particular favorites of mine included: - Lindsay King-Miller (no relation)'s "The Fruit" for its depiction of how "...there are worse things than unfaithfulness." - Steve Toase's "The Jaws of Ourobouros" for phrasing like: "Anything too immobile to resist the gnawing of the stone circles was ground to paste and swallowed down hollow, echoing throats," as well as his "Papa Yaga" character and the ruthless cruelty of (apparently) Russian organized crime in a wholly unfamiliar and horrifying landscape. - Stephanie Ellis' "The Way of the Mother" for the way it tweaked my own conflicting desires to prepare and protect my own sons as they grow up. - S.T. Gibson's "Revival" for her expert capture of a child who doesn't fit in: "She had tried so many times before to open herself up to the holy euphoria that attended so easily to her father and grandfather, but she was never sure if she was doing it right, or what exactly she was supposed to be feeling" -- and what this culminates in for Callie Ann, her family, and her community. These stories remind you that beneath the veneer of what we call "civilization" are still nightmares and superstitions that our best efforts can't easily push away.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hugo

    A welcome change of pace, as far as horror anthologies go, though certainly a collection which starts strongly and then peters out somewhat. Having only two writers outside the U.S. (not without its own folklore, but certainly missing the huge history evident in British and European tradition) is perhaps an issue. The opening tales either indulge the tradition of folk horror or explore it in new - and in one case audacious - fashion: Lindsay King-Miller's The Fruit is by far my favourite, a beaut A welcome change of pace, as far as horror anthologies go, though certainly a collection which starts strongly and then peters out somewhat. Having only two writers outside the U.S. (not without its own folklore, but certainly missing the huge history evident in British and European tradition) is perhaps an issue. The opening tales either indulge the tradition of folk horror or explore it in new - and in one case audacious - fashion: Lindsay King-Miller's The Fruit is by far my favourite, a beautiful dark love story; Coy Hall's Sire of the Hatchet is very a modern interpretation of Puritan dread and prejudice, while Sam Hicks's Back Along the Old Track is an engrossing contemporisation along similar lines; pride of place must also go to Steve Toase's post-apocalyptic The Jaws of Ouroboros, with its startling interpretation of stone circles as teeth, masticating all around them; Eric J. Guignard's The First Order of Whaleyville's Divine Basilisk Handlers seems predictable, but is redeemed with a very darkly satisfying ending. The rest of the collection comes as an increasing disappointment: a retelling of an old classic which never finds a convincing tone; two stories which tread very familiar ground, with foreseeable finales (fans of folk horror films (view spoiler)[The Wicker Man and Kill List (hide spoiler)] will see these endings coming from the first page); and the anthology finishes limply on a decent enough tale, but a story which I'd argue isn't folk horror at all.

  24. 4 out of 5

    GracieKat

    I love folk music, especially the darker toned ones about ghosts and murder ballads (if you'd like to check out a list of some great ones click here). So I was very interested in Fiends in the Furrows when it was offered for review. First off, I love the cover. The top portion has a very ritualistic feel and the bottom makes me think of the roots going deep. Very deep, indeed. So what about the stories? Well, let's take a look at them: Sire of the Hatchet: I'm not too sure how I feel about this o I love folk music, especially the darker toned ones about ghosts and murder ballads (if you'd like to check out a list of some great ones click here). So I was very interested in Fiends in the Furrows when it was offered for review. First off, I love the cover. The top portion has a very ritualistic feel and the bottom makes me think of the roots going deep. Very deep, indeed. So what about the stories? Well, let's take a look at them: Sire of the Hatchet: I'm not too sure how I feel about this one. I liked it. It was creepy and had a nice undertone of dread to it. However, at the end I was waiting for a bit. Back Along the Old Track: A visitor to the rural countryside finds out that some families have secrets. This, again, was a good story. I did want some sort of explanation as to why the Sleators died hard. The Fruit: I loved The Fruit and I was genuinely creeped out as to what I could imagine from the ending. The Jaws of Ouroboras: I loved the concept behind this story. I'm not spoiling anything by saying standing stones are teeth. You'll have to read it to see where it goes from there! I loved the rest of the story as well. The First Order of Whaleyville's Divine Basilisk Handlers: This story was just ok for me. It's really easy to tell early on how it's going to end and the story just wasn't that compelling to me. Others might like it better, though. Pumpkin, Dear: This was a story that I really didn't like. I didn't like the plot and I didn't like the characters. It felt as though the story really, really wanted us to sympathize with the wife but I just couldn't. The Way of the Mother: This was a very interesting story and had a twist that I didn't see coming. Leave the Night: I had a hard time getting into this story. It seemed overly long and kind of boring, in my opinion. It had a Wicker man/Children of the Corn feel to it that I liked but it was slow going for me. Someone else may like it better. It just didn't click with me. Revival: I really loved this story. I really liked this collection and I hope it becomes a series because we really, really need more folk horror. A lot more. Received from the author/publisher for review consideration Find this review and more on scifiandscary.com

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    Folk horror is one of my favorite horror subgenres, so I couldn't resist picking this up as fall slowly works its way here. Keeping the collection to nine stories is wise, as there were resultingly no true duds in the bunch. Sure, some were less successful than others, as is the wont of any multi-author collection, but for every shrugsy story, there was S.T. Gibson's "Revival" or Eric J. Guinard's "The First Order of Whaleyville's Divine Basilisk Handlers." (Both revolve around snakes and Southe Folk horror is one of my favorite horror subgenres, so I couldn't resist picking this up as fall slowly works its way here. Keeping the collection to nine stories is wise, as there were resultingly no true duds in the bunch. Sure, some were less successful than others, as is the wont of any multi-author collection, but for every shrugsy story, there was S.T. Gibson's "Revival" or Eric J. Guinard's "The First Order of Whaleyville's Divine Basilisk Handlers." (Both revolve around snakes and Southern revival meetings, and both are worth your time.) But my easy favorite was Lindsay King-Miller's "The Fruit." She knows just how much to explain and how much to leave to the reader's imagination here, and the inexorable descent toward the story's climax is chilling in its simplicity. It's a delightful slice of spookiness in a collection perfect for the harvest season.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Morrissey

    Reviewing an anthology featuring various authors is unfair, as the ‘stars’ given are for the whole, not the parts — and the whole isn’t necessarily greater than the sum of those parts. The stand out stories in the collection are ‘Sire of the Hatchet’, ‘The Fruit’, ‘The First Order of Whaleyville’s Divine Basilisk Handlers’, and ‘The Way of the Mother’. All five star stories. The rest range between a damn good yarn (‘Revival’, four stars) and forgettable/hard to slog through (‘Leave the Night’, 2 Reviewing an anthology featuring various authors is unfair, as the ‘stars’ given are for the whole, not the parts — and the whole isn’t necessarily greater than the sum of those parts. The stand out stories in the collection are ‘Sire of the Hatchet’, ‘The Fruit’, ‘The First Order of Whaleyville’s Divine Basilisk Handlers’, and ‘The Way of the Mother’. All five star stories. The rest range between a damn good yarn (‘Revival’, four stars) and forgettable/hard to slog through (‘Leave the Night’, 2 stars). On the overall negative, this collection is terribly edited/proofread, with typos littered throughout. It’s rather shocking that a published piece would be so amateurishly released, with lazy attention given by the editor. Ultimately, it’s a good read, but it takes serious liberties with folk horror, with a few of the stories lacking almost all flourishes that define the subgenre.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nick Swarbrick

    Some real appreciation of the genre, and at times a vivid exploration of rural living. My favourite has to be the compelling and brilliantly underwritten “Way of the Mother,” with a genuine bio-horror in “The Fruit” coming a close second. But this is a collection, and some are more attractive to me than others, some feeling a bit too much of a caricature to no effect. There is, however, effective writing in some of these “country folk writ large:” creepiness and comedy combine in “Pumpkin Dear,” Some real appreciation of the genre, and at times a vivid exploration of rural living. My favourite has to be the compelling and brilliantly underwritten “Way of the Mother,” with a genuine bio-horror in “The Fruit” coming a close second. But this is a collection, and some are more attractive to me than others, some feeling a bit too much of a caricature to no effect. There is, however, effective writing in some of these “country folk writ large:” creepiness and comedy combine in “Pumpkin Dear,” and in the bleak twists of the final story on power and influence in a snake handling church which is reminiscent of adult Roald Dahl and none the worse for that.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christian Orton

    The opening story "The Sire of the Hatchet" is the real gem here. It feels fully developed and the author creates some real deep characters despite the briefness of the story, and the environment he creates is creepy and mysterious (slightly reminiscent of "The Wicker Man"). 4 starts out of 5 for that one. But the rest of the collection really struggles.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Si

    Two stars for the two books that stood out for me: The Fruit and Jaws of the Ouroboros. They were the strangest in the collections and did a good job of creating strange new worlds for me. They did away with much of the empty exposition that weighed down some of the other stories in the collection and just chucked you in. A few of the others were readable but nothing exciting.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eileen H

    I loved these stories. They felt timeless, hearkening back to a more mythic past yet still eerily relevant. “The Jaws of Ourobos” and “The Way of the Mother” stood out in particular for me for the way they collapse time, bringing together past and present for a modern, haunting spin on folk tales. Definitely recommend to fans of horror and folklore.

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