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The Science of Self-Learning: How to Teach Yourself Anything, Learn More in Less Time, and Direct Your Own Education

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How to learn effectively when you have to be both the teacher and student. Work smarter and save yourself countless hours. Self-learning is not just about performing better in the classroom or the office. It’s about being able to aim your life in whatever direction you choose and conquering the obstacles in front of you. Replicable methods and insights to build How to learn effectively when you have to be both the teacher and student. Work smarter and save yourself countless hours. Self-learning is not just about performing better in the classroom or the office. It’s about being able to aim your life in whatever direction you choose and conquering the obstacles in front of you. Replicable methods and insights to build expertise from ground zero. The Science of Self-Learning focuses not only on learning, but what it means to direct your own learning. Anyone can read a book, but what about more? You will learn to deconstruct a topic and then construct your own syllabus and plan. Gathering information, initial research, having a dialogue with new information - unlock these skills and you will unlock your life. Make complex topics painless and less intimidating to approach and break down. Peter Hollins has studied psychology and peak human performance for over a dozen years and is a bestselling author. He has worked with a multitude of individuals to unlock their potential and path towards success. His writing draws on his academic, coaching, and research experience. Develop habits and skills to fulfill your career or hobby goals. • Understand the learning success pyramid and how self-regulation and confidence impact learning. • How to stay motivated in tedious and tiring learning. • The SQ3R Method and conversing with information. Science-based methods to help your brain absorb and retain more. • Speed reading and comprehension. • How to plan and schedule like Benjamin Franklin. • How to extract information like juice from an orange. Most people have multiple careers in their lives. Self-learning is how you keep up and adapt. The only thing that is given in life is that it will change. Seasons change. Moods change. You will change. Whatever happens, you will need to adapt to your new circumstances. Survival of the fittest isn’t just something that exists in science textbooks - it’s what happens in every phase of your life. The ability to learn is what determines whether you sink or swim. Gain the competitive edge and upgrade yourself by learning how to learn: scroll up and click the BUY NOW button.


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How to learn effectively when you have to be both the teacher and student. Work smarter and save yourself countless hours. Self-learning is not just about performing better in the classroom or the office. It’s about being able to aim your life in whatever direction you choose and conquering the obstacles in front of you. Replicable methods and insights to build How to learn effectively when you have to be both the teacher and student. Work smarter and save yourself countless hours. Self-learning is not just about performing better in the classroom or the office. It’s about being able to aim your life in whatever direction you choose and conquering the obstacles in front of you. Replicable methods and insights to build expertise from ground zero. The Science of Self-Learning focuses not only on learning, but what it means to direct your own learning. Anyone can read a book, but what about more? You will learn to deconstruct a topic and then construct your own syllabus and plan. Gathering information, initial research, having a dialogue with new information - unlock these skills and you will unlock your life. Make complex topics painless and less intimidating to approach and break down. Peter Hollins has studied psychology and peak human performance for over a dozen years and is a bestselling author. He has worked with a multitude of individuals to unlock their potential and path towards success. His writing draws on his academic, coaching, and research experience. Develop habits and skills to fulfill your career or hobby goals. • Understand the learning success pyramid and how self-regulation and confidence impact learning. • How to stay motivated in tedious and tiring learning. • The SQ3R Method and conversing with information. Science-based methods to help your brain absorb and retain more. • Speed reading and comprehension. • How to plan and schedule like Benjamin Franklin. • How to extract information like juice from an orange. Most people have multiple careers in their lives. Self-learning is how you keep up and adapt. The only thing that is given in life is that it will change. Seasons change. Moods change. You will change. Whatever happens, you will need to adapt to your new circumstances. Survival of the fittest isn’t just something that exists in science textbooks - it’s what happens in every phase of your life. The ability to learn is what determines whether you sink or swim. Gain the competitive edge and upgrade yourself by learning how to learn: scroll up and click the BUY NOW button.

30 review for The Science of Self-Learning: How to Teach Yourself Anything, Learn More in Less Time, and Direct Your Own Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    This is a good guide for self-learners who want to create a study plan to retain information. The first chapter is about motivation and learning, which may already be familiar to many (e.g., extrinsic and intrinsic motivation). To get the most out of this book, pick a subject to learn and apply the technique SQ3R: * Survey: Get a general overview of what you're reading. Establish the goals you want to achieve from reading the book. * Question: Write down questions you have on the subject. * Read: R This is a good guide for self-learners who want to create a study plan to retain information. The first chapter is about motivation and learning, which may already be familiar to many (e.g., extrinsic and intrinsic motivation). To get the most out of this book, pick a subject to learn and apply the technique SQ3R: * Survey: Get a general overview of what you're reading. Establish the goals you want to achieve from reading the book. * Question: Write down questions you have on the subject. * Read: Read the book. Learn to speed read so you're not sub-vocalizing (saying the words in your head), which unnecessarily slows you down. * Recite: Recite the main points in your own words. * Review: Write test questions for yourself. Can you answer the questions? Can you explain the concepts?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Justin Oliver

    BLUF: If you study, this isn't new material. If you never learned how to study, you need this book above all else. As a person who relied on memorization throughout school, this book is the answer to fixing that habit. Many reviewers mentioned the book offers no secret tricks or great breakthroughs and it doesn't...if you already know how to study. People like me do not. We learned subjects easy in school because of our eidetic memories and so never learned how to note take ir study or even how to BLUF: If you study, this isn't new material. If you never learned how to study, you need this book above all else. As a person who relied on memorization throughout school, this book is the answer to fixing that habit. Many reviewers mentioned the book offers no secret tricks or great breakthroughs and it doesn't...if you already know how to study. People like me do not. We learned subjects easy in school because of our eidetic memories and so never learned how to note take ir study or even how to read with the purpose of gaining knowledge. This book fixes that. I will use these "basic tricks" for the rest of my pursuit of learning. Thank you so much, Mr Peter Hollins.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Em

    It's OK, but it didn't cover anything new. Does anyone else find it odd that this book has so many 5-star reviews written in the same unusual format by users without profile pics? I needed to use up "Great on Kindle" credit and it was the only book I could find that wasn't about religion or dieting. :/

  4. 5 out of 5

    William Schram

    Let’s face it, learning is hard. Considering all of the distractions available in today’s modern society the fact that we learn anything is astonishing. I don’t know about the rest of the world, but in the United States people generally attend school for 12 years. School is usually treated as an institution, with educators teaching from books, lectures, and activities. The important thing is to be able to regurgitate information. Creativity is discouraged in this context. There is one way to do Let’s face it, learning is hard. Considering all of the distractions available in today’s modern society the fact that we learn anything is astonishing. I don’t know about the rest of the world, but in the United States people generally attend school for 12 years. School is usually treated as an institution, with educators teaching from books, lectures, and activities. The important thing is to be able to regurgitate information. Creativity is discouraged in this context. There is one way to do things and if you don’t get it you fall behind the rest of your class. Learning doesn’t have to stop when you leave school. Ideally, you want to be learning for your entire life. The problem is that once people leave school, they never feel like cracking open a book again. They have been dissuaded from learning ever again. This is unfortunate, but that is the reality for many people. Peter Hollins wrote The Science of Self-Learning to help those people who want to learn on their own. The book is written in a large font and is rather slim. It contains techniques to build your confidence, and techniques used for taking notes, and so on. There is also a section to teach you how to read faster. There are ways to tell how much you know about a subject, and where there are gaps in your knowledge. The confidence part is easy to understand. We can use me as an example; I have been trying to learn things that require higher-level mathematics for a while now, and haven’t gotten anywhere. It is enough to get frustrated and stop trying altogether. However, I feel that I can learn whatever I want to learn. There is nothing that can persuade me otherwise. It could very easily have gone the other way. Take my recent reading of Classical Mechanics. I could have seen the del operator and threw up my hands in frustration, closing that book forever. I didn’t though, I just take it as something that I need to work on. Vector Calculus here I come. The book summarizes all of the information on the final few pages. It repeats the techniques and methods in an easy to follow manner. I enjoyed it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Petr Stedry

    A foreword to my reviews. The number of stars is heavily influenced by the effect a book had on me personally. The same effect might not be there in your situation. My expectation when choosing this book was to understand more about self-learning. And learn something I did. What most stuck with me was "read faster" and I did even try it out while reading the book. On the other hand, my goal was always closer to understand more deeply rather than amass a quantity of material. I also expected to dis A foreword to my reviews. The number of stars is heavily influenced by the effect a book had on me personally. The same effect might not be there in your situation. My expectation when choosing this book was to understand more about self-learning. And learn something I did. What most stuck with me was "read faster" and I did even try it out while reading the book. On the other hand, my goal was always closer to understand more deeply rather than amass a quantity of material. I also expected to discover more proven – possibly even scientifically proven – methods. What I found was a compilation of inspiration from historical figures (e.g. Benjamin Franklin, Richard Feynman) mixed with other frameworks and advice that was not attributed to a source. Also, the examples used later in the book (one of them was "Keynesian economics") felt artificial I found it hard to imagine the utility of such an approach. What I lacked most were more tools or structure to understand a topic systematically (e.g. mapping it out, prioritizing sub-topics, selecting sources). That being said, there were still a few points and techniques – some of which I already knew about and revisited – and therefore I feel this book deserves 3 stars. Recommended for people who are at the beginning of their self-learning path to quickly discover some of the tools to help them.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    Not anything new or ground breaking, but organized all the top tools and learning methods into one place. Great book to quickly learn what tools are out there that could quickly help your learning. But for some of the tools, maybe need to find additional time and resources to deep dive and develop those skills.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Agne

    It's quick and gives reasonable advice, but for me, it's all a bit superficial. But maybe I'm being too critical, I can't really point out what I'm missing and whether it should have been included or not. Maybe what to do with the knowledge? Or how practical skills would compare to learning theory? And I guess I'm not a fan of the whole speed-reading promo thing - not sure it actually gives much if your aim is to take useful notes and engage with the text fully, especially when you're starting t It's quick and gives reasonable advice, but for me, it's all a bit superficial. But maybe I'm being too critical, I can't really point out what I'm missing and whether it should have been included or not. Maybe what to do with the knowledge? Or how practical skills would compare to learning theory? And I guess I'm not a fan of the whole speed-reading promo thing - not sure it actually gives much if your aim is to take useful notes and engage with the text fully, especially when you're starting to learn sth from zero. Then again, I might try it out and be proven wrong. Key points: *make a plan *train your eyes *use reading strategies *engage with the material systematically *ask questions and research what you can't answer

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Morgan

    Fantastic. Biggest advantage of this book is how it frames everything in a nice free flowing model. Contains many tips and tricks organized well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aida

    Pretty dang good! I wasn’t sure about this book at first, but then it taught me to speed read! I’ve always struggled to read because I was so slow! I’m so glad I read this all the way through to the end. Great book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    For those of us who are self-taught learners or who want to start a self-study course, this is truly a wonderful book. This is also a wonderful resource for any student and especially those who take online degree programs and courses. A lot of insightful information on how to go about studying on one's own and why it's so beneficial. Also, some wonderful note-taking techniques. Truly a wonderful book for anyone embarking on the self-learning path.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hani

    Excellent Guide to Self-Learning Methodology Highly recommended for anyone who’s motivated to learn something new. The disciplines and tools described are logical, convincing and easy to follow. The examples provided serve as a vehicle for proving the effectiveness of using the the proposed methodology for being a student and teacher at the same time. This book is an excellent reference to use from time to time whenever one is about to embark on a new challenge be it research, a new job or a curios Excellent Guide to Self-Learning Methodology Highly recommended for anyone who’s motivated to learn something new. The disciplines and tools described are logical, convincing and easy to follow. The examples provided serve as a vehicle for proving the effectiveness of using the the proposed methodology for being a student and teacher at the same time. This book is an excellent reference to use from time to time whenever one is about to embark on a new challenge be it research, a new job or a curiosity about subjects we want to know more about.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jim Lyons

    The Science of Self-Learning was a great read for me! The author, Peter Hollins, includes an appeal for a review, so I have put some time and thought into some of the book's positive attributes as well as a few things I found lacking. As someone who has done quite a bit of self-learning in recent years, it was comforting for me to encounter so many of the same techniques and methods which I have used. These include Cornell Notes, the Feynman method, and critical thinking, to name a few. It was g The Science of Self-Learning was a great read for me! The author, Peter Hollins, includes an appeal for a review, so I have put some time and thought into some of the book's positive attributes as well as a few things I found lacking. As someone who has done quite a bit of self-learning in recent years, it was comforting for me to encounter so many of the same techniques and methods which I have used. These include Cornell Notes, the Feynman method, and critical thinking, to name a few. It was great validation to find these and others in this book. What was missing? I was very surprised in the "reading" chapter to find no mention of the speed-reading tools commonly available these days. Two which I use regularly are Instapaper's tool as well as Kindle Fire's Word Runner. It seems all of the book's rather lengthy advice would apply only to conventional hard-copy books. And speaking of Kindle, this is the format I purchased "The Science of Self-Learning" - where is any comparison of this approach, including its note-taking/highlighting capabilities? Another shortcoming I found was the lack of mention of the popularity of the Pomodoro technique of learning, which centers around 25-minute spans of distraction-free focus. Instead we get Peter Drucker's (essentially the same) 50-minute method. Not a big difference but it makes it seem quite dated (as due a few other references like "civics" as an area of study). All in all, I am happy to rate the book at four stars, and the suggested improvements could elevate it to a fifth star.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nitin Kishore

    Since I had come across the Cornell note taking system and Marty lobdell's YouTube video on how to study less but understand more, this book made me a syntopical reader for the most part. Being an autodidact is what most people should aim for. SQ3R method is the main takeaway for me from this

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris Esposo

    A surprisingly good quick book on the practice of autodidacticism, the author goes over some useful tips on increasing comprehension via purposeful readings (and re-readings), self-commentary/self-analysis of the material, tips on speed-reading by removing possible inner/soft lip readings, using fingers as visual directive aids, and exercising eye-movement muscles to increase the mechanical nature of shifting views from left to right (or right to left depending on the continent you are living in A surprisingly good quick book on the practice of autodidacticism, the author goes over some useful tips on increasing comprehension via purposeful readings (and re-readings), self-commentary/self-analysis of the material, tips on speed-reading by removing possible inner/soft lip readings, using fingers as visual directive aids, and exercising eye-movement muscles to increase the mechanical nature of shifting views from left to right (or right to left depending on the continent you are living in currently). He further goes over other tips in this domain including the practice of visually stripping filler/stem words and extracting only the meaningful ones to aid speed-reading/comprehension (it's interesting that this is actually the same technique a machine would leverage in text mining). The author guides the reader who is assumed to be new to self-learning providing some background on the differences between learning via mentor/formal instructor and learning by oneself, and shows why the later is definitely more difficult, and requires some additional mental/practice structure. However, is still achievable (and a desirable) once set up in one's daily patterns. Though there are many self-published content on Amazon, and much of it trash, this is a well-written text with useful information. I'm hoping there will be more detailed morsels of technique to be gleaned in the author's other books. Recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    I saw this book in my recommends on the Kindle App and it was sale so I thought why not. I am big into self learning. I love picking up new subjects like botnay, mechanics, astronomy or even programming to self learn. I thought this book could give me some pointers. Most of the concepts were things that I have already heard or familiar with. I noticed on some of the reviews people viewed that as a bad thing. I do not. I do not because how convenient that all these concepts are in one location no I saw this book in my recommends on the Kindle App and it was sale so I thought why not. I am big into self learning. I love picking up new subjects like botnay, mechanics, astronomy or even programming to self learn. I thought this book could give me some pointers. Most of the concepts were things that I have already heard or familiar with. I noticed on some of the reviews people viewed that as a bad thing. I do not. I do not because how convenient that all these concepts are in one location now. This book from now on will serve to me as a reference that I will often go back fo just skim over the chapters again. This will help me keep these important concepts fresh. The book is packed with good examples, stories and studies that reinforce everything. I highly reccomend this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    juliet

    Good read I have been trying to learn a new subject which I have totally no knowledge of. So this title caught my eye. When I started self-learning, it was intimidating for sure. This book has taught me that such fear and discomfort are normal, and it gave insights on how to become a better learner. The author wrote about the SQ3R technique, taking Cornell notes and employing Feynman technique. These were new to me, but they make a lot of sense. I think the greatest barrier of becoming a self-lea Good read I have been trying to learn a new subject which I have totally no knowledge of. So this title caught my eye. When I started self-learning, it was intimidating for sure. This book has taught me that such fear and discomfort are normal, and it gave insights on how to become a better learner. The author wrote about the SQ3R technique, taking Cornell notes and employing Feynman technique. These were new to me, but they make a lot of sense. I think the greatest barrier of becoming a self-learner is definitely having the discipline to do so, at least for me. And not forgetting having the confidence that everyone can master any subject, like what the author wrote. Great learners are made, not born. Happy learning everyone!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emma Popovic

    I decided to spend some of my summer break by reading that would help transform me but didn't read before due to time. If you're starting any project with self-growth, either spiritual, personal, mental, career or relationship wise, it's best to read this book first so you get the blueprints for starting it and you have the foundation in yourself for learning. It covers everything you need, from how to naturally read faster while still retaining what you've read, to Cornell Notes and Self-explan I decided to spend some of my summer break by reading that would help transform me but didn't read before due to time. If you're starting any project with self-growth, either spiritual, personal, mental, career or relationship wise, it's best to read this book first so you get the blueprints for starting it and you have the foundation in yourself for learning. It covers everything you need, from how to naturally read faster while still retaining what you've read, to Cornell Notes and Self-explanation to make sure that you've covered the material, to getting yourself into the right frame of mind and energy to do so as well the skills and habit you need, like how to do SMART goals to researching from scratch to how to understand material versus just memorizing it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Debra Crichlow

    For me, this was an excellent read. I'm trying to learn own my own and found myself getting nowhere and/or frustrated. I didn't know how to continuously move forward in subjects I knew little to nothing about. This book filled in the missing gaps in my learning strategies, so now I know how to get to the "end" with not only a feeling of accomplishment, but with specific measurable results to see how much I've achieved. Joining the ranks of Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein, two famous autodi For me, this was an excellent read. I'm trying to learn own my own and found myself getting nowhere and/or frustrated. I didn't know how to continuously move forward in subjects I knew little to nothing about. This book filled in the missing gaps in my learning strategies, so now I know how to get to the "end" with not only a feeling of accomplishment, but with specific measurable results to see how much I've achieved. Joining the ranks of Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein, two famous autodidacts, is now possible for anyone who has the self-motivation to do the hard, but doable work of self-learning.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Henry

    This is definitely something I would recommend to anyone setting out to learn something. This would be great for a high school or college student. It is a quick, clear guide to help you improve how you learn. I know from my own kids that some of these techniques are taught in school starting in elementary school, but I am not always sure if the kids realize they are being taught how to learn. I think having something like this book would help kids understand what it was all about. I am recommend This is definitely something I would recommend to anyone setting out to learn something. This would be great for a high school or college student. It is a quick, clear guide to help you improve how you learn. I know from my own kids that some of these techniques are taught in school starting in elementary school, but I am not always sure if the kids realize they are being taught how to learn. I think having something like this book would help kids understand what it was all about. I am recommending this to both of my high school students. The narration was excellent!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenika Scott

    The power lies within This is a practical guide that gives you a broad essence on how you can teach yourself anything. If you are looking for a step by step guide to learning this is not the book for you. Rather, this book teaches you how to train yourself to read faster & comprehensively, plan efficiently & effectively, engage in critical thinking and underpin the importance of developing a growth mindset that is necessary to learn anything. This was definitely a great read. The power lies within This is a practical guide that gives you a broad essence on how you can teach yourself anything. If you are looking for a step by step guide to learning this is not the book for you. Rather, this book teaches you how to train yourself to read faster & comprehensively, plan efficiently & effectively, engage in critical thinking and underpin the importance of developing a growth mindset that is necessary to learn anything. This was definitely a great read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Viktor Hornberg

    This is gold. Everyone that's into non fiction should give this one a go, I love reading non fiction and learning from them but sometimes it can be hard to learn everything I read, becuse most of the time I have read it like a regular novel. Since reading this book I have gotten a better grasp on how to go deeper into the non fiction books I consume and there revard for going the extra mile is tremendously.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ngoc Anh

    A useful book! I'm an autodidact and and love self-learning because I feel it makes my learning much more interesting than school does. Thus, I'm with the author about the benefits and the obstacles we may meet when learning something new. The book also gives us some suggestions to go through and reach our goals. I'll give it a try!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Helen Milenski

    A good synopsis of techniques I believe this is a good tool to reference for people already familiar with some techniques of self-learning. A useful addition could be a few exercises added.to the illustrative examples. Even a simple exercise could help drill home the steps or purpose for each technique.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rick Yvanovich

    I was curious about this book so decided to read it in the hope that it would assist in speeding up self-learning. I was pretty fascinated with learning styles and was trying to think back to my school days to see if I could detect any of those techniques being used ... can't say I can remember! An interesting read and there are a few things in it like SQ3R which are worth a try.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robert Reed

    A great and concise book The author pulls no punches. Self-Learning is hard, but rewarding. Each chapter is packed with information. No fluff or links to other works. The information was concise and easy to digest. With realistic goals, and implementing the practices outlined in the book,you could not help but to succeed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew C

    Solid Approach to Self Learning I really liked this book and it’s a great awareness tool for what self learning entails - you really need to reflect on your approach and why you are embarking on something you want to learn. The author is very good at structure and writing content. I like the warnings on self discipline and expectations. Well done.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anthony L. Ryan Jr.

    This book fairly motivating. It gives an honest perception about learning. Even though it only states the surface of tools you can use to improve your learning experience it is enough to kick start you to continue your quest. A good enough book.to motivate you with discipline . I learned some methods that will help me in my quest.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Phil Golden

    Great learning tools Strategically placed throughout this book are tools for self learning that are “leaps forward” concepts and devices that are extremely useful and gave me many “Yes, I can do that” moments. My two favorites are increasing reading skills and the “growth mindset”.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Harston

    Great learning tool If you are looking for something to get you motivated to self learning then this book is for you. It will motivate you to start the self discovery of who you are because most people will not educate themself and Reliance on some one else in their life for learning

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Mejia

    I started to read this book because I wanted to dig deep into other metodologies which sums up on my new learning processes. Even though some of the covered topics are sort of common sense, the author did a great job on summarizing the most important skills to rise in order to acquire knowledge without needing a tutor. I loved this reading, so I highly recommend.

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