free hit counter code The Warlock of Firetop Mountain - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Warlock of Firetop Mountain

Availability: Ready to download

FIGHTING FANTASY is the brilliant series of adventure gamebooks in which YOU are the hero! Decide which monsters to fight, which paths to take, who to trust and when to run. Can you survive the clutches of the hideous Bloodbeast, or defeat a noxious inhuman Orc? Deep in the caverns beneath Firetop Mountain lies an untold wealth of treasure, guarded by a powerful Warlock -o FIGHTING FANTASY is the brilliant series of adventure gamebooks in which YOU are the hero! Decide which monsters to fight, which paths to take, who to trust and when to run. Can you survive the clutches of the hideous Bloodbeast, or defeat a noxious inhuman Orc? Deep in the caverns beneath Firetop Mountain lies an untold wealth of treasure, guarded by a powerful Warlock -or so the rumor goes. Several adventurers like yourself have set off for Firetop Mountain in search of the Warlock's hoard. None has ever returned. Do you dare follow them?


Compare
Ads Banner

FIGHTING FANTASY is the brilliant series of adventure gamebooks in which YOU are the hero! Decide which monsters to fight, which paths to take, who to trust and when to run. Can you survive the clutches of the hideous Bloodbeast, or defeat a noxious inhuman Orc? Deep in the caverns beneath Firetop Mountain lies an untold wealth of treasure, guarded by a powerful Warlock -o FIGHTING FANTASY is the brilliant series of adventure gamebooks in which YOU are the hero! Decide which monsters to fight, which paths to take, who to trust and when to run. Can you survive the clutches of the hideous Bloodbeast, or defeat a noxious inhuman Orc? Deep in the caverns beneath Firetop Mountain lies an untold wealth of treasure, guarded by a powerful Warlock -or so the rumor goes. Several adventurers like yourself have set off for Firetop Mountain in search of the Warlock's hoard. None has ever returned. Do you dare follow them?

30 review for The Warlock of Firetop Mountain

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    "NERD!!!"...There. Now that we've got that out of the way, allow me to continue... I bought this Dungeons & Dragons style game book years ago in a shop on (or maybe just off) the high street in St. Albans while on honeymoon in England. And to answer the obvious question that follows...yes, my wife is an unusually understanding woman. The Warlock of Firetop Mountain is apparently a classic of the fantasy adventure gamebook sort. *shrugs* What did I know? When I picked it up I thought it was one of "NERD!!!"...There. Now that we've got that out of the way, allow me to continue... I bought this Dungeons & Dragons style game book years ago in a shop on (or maybe just off) the high street in St. Albans while on honeymoon in England. And to answer the obvious question that follows...yes, my wife is an unusually understanding woman. The Warlock of Firetop Mountain is apparently a classic of the fantasy adventure gamebook sort. *shrugs* What did I know? When I picked it up I thought it was one of those old-school Choose Your Own Adventure kind of books. Alas no. This lays out a "dungeon crawl" (ancient gaming style in which adventurers enter a maze-like setting often underground in a tomb or highly fictionalized castle dungeon) in which the adventurer (created by you) journeys through in an attempt to pick up treasure and not get killed by monsters and traps. With the physical book, you're suppose to write shit down, like maps, and keep track of "hit points" or items found in the dungeon, which I honestly wasn't interested in doing, so I only flipped through the book, read a few passages and never played it. Fast-forward seven years to a technologically wondrous time known as the 2010s and low-and-behold what should I find but The Warlock of Firetop Mountain as a free ebook, an ebook which kept track of all the extraneous crap for you! "Wow," I think I might have shouted in my head as I moved on to more enriching reading material. Ah but it stuck in my craw, so I ended up getting it a few days later for my Kindle and finally played/read the damn thing. The adventure is contrived to the extreme! Sure it's fun enough to tramp through the dungeon hoping you make the right choices as you come up against goblins and ghouls, but if you step back and think about it a moment, the whole premise is ridiculous, even for fantasy standards! Why would a super powerful and highly intelligent warlock create an incredibly convoluted, deadly maze and sit in it all day, everyday just waiting for some fool to stumble into it and die? Anyone in solitary confinement all that time would welcome visitors! There's a number of other nonsensical encounters seemingly thrown into the game in order to add color to the story, like an old man calmly sitting in a rocking chair in a room set up like a cluttered cottage which is surrounded by deviously trapped rooms, orcs up the wazoo, a minotaur's labyrinth, deadly sandworms that pop out of the banks of a highly impassable Styx-like river, etc etc etc. How is the poor old man suppose to get his shopping done stuck in the middle of all this dangerous danger?! As implausible as it all is, it's what fantasy is all about: fantasy. Suspend belief and enjoy the adventure! PIX APPENDIX! Not all fantasy artwork is created equal. Some of it sucks ass. The illustrations in this one are actually pretty good. Check it out...

  2. 4 out of 5

    James Tivendale

    I read an interview the other day that the Malazan world was based upon some Steve Jackson-esque RPG gaming. It made me remember that I loved these books when I was a child. I can't remember too much about them apart from that you had to roll dices and set you own attributes and character. That you would face unspeakable foes and go on a whirlwind fantasy adventure.... Do you fight the warlock - turn to page 283 - do you run away - turn to page 7.... Page 7 = YOU ARE DEAD!! It was real energetic I read an interview the other day that the Malazan world was based upon some Steve Jackson-esque RPG gaming. It made me remember that I loved these books when I was a child. I can't remember too much about them apart from that you had to roll dices and set you own attributes and character. That you would face unspeakable foes and go on a whirlwind fantasy adventure.... Do you fight the warlock - turn to page 283 - do you run away - turn to page 7.... Page 7 = YOU ARE DEAD!! It was real energetic and amazing for young me as a 10-13 year old child. I can't remember the stories too well which is why I am only posting one review regarding the 6 - 12 I read. I remember loving this one. The first in the series. I really want to stalk libraries to see if I can find these books again. Spent so many hours with friends contemplating which path in the dungeon to take... before we DIED!! :) I occasionally made it to page 400 where all was well and the day was saved, but not often. James x. www.youandibooks.wordpress.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leo .

    If you love dungeons and dragons and fantasy and fiction I recommend this book. It is actually a game and very good too. I read all of Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone's books in my youth. It lead to me writing my first fantasy novel Kandor The Warrior, by Leo.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    A classic gamebook with a classic dungeoneer old style adventure and the maze can be a real frustrating challenge, but this is the first Fighting Fantasy book and it spawned lots of sequels and more (Warhammer and Malazan fantasy series settings were strongly inspired by the World of Titan from FF): every Role Playing Game Player/Master should try it at last ome time in his life. A classic gamebook with a classic dungeoneer old style adventure and the maze can be a real frustrating challenge, but this is the first Fighting Fantasy book and it spawned lots of sequels and more (Warhammer and Malazan fantasy series settings were strongly inspired by the World of Titan from FF): every Role Playing Game Player/Master should try it at last ome time in his life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leo .

    Got me started...opened my imagination!🐯👍

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Kids today eh? They're far too busy playing finely tuned, graphically superior, deeply immersive games like Skyrim to appreciate what a real gaming experience should be like. Back in my day if you wanted to fight a Dragon you had to have a real Adventure that looked and played something like this. Us intrepid block-like Adventurers set out to steal the magic cup of greatness from the evil black castle armed only with a trusty spear. The evil roaring dragon would smite you whole if you were not ca Kids today eh? They're far too busy playing finely tuned, graphically superior, deeply immersive games like Skyrim to appreciate what a real gaming experience should be like. Back in my day if you wanted to fight a Dragon you had to have a real Adventure that looked and played something like this. Us intrepid block-like Adventurers set out to steal the magic cup of greatness from the evil black castle armed only with a trusty spear. The evil roaring dragon would smite you whole if you were not careful. That is, make a wrong move in the scary maze and you'd be inside that dude's tummy as fast as he could roar. That was a real manly adventure for real men. Not boys. Around the same time we had another real adventure that if you gave it to a ten year old now he'd laugh in your face. "Where are the good graphics?" he would cry, and in response I would say something like "hahahahahaha young child, what do you know about gaming? I have 30 years of experience over you. I am older and wiser and have played all of the games ever, from Pacman/Space Invaders, to Shadow of the Beast to Rainbow Islands to Legend of Zelda. You think you can tell me what a great game is? FOOL. (...of a Took, if I feel like showing off my knoweldge of fine literature quotations). I tell you young BOY (because girls aren't allowed in this club, K?) that this is a GAME and you shall sit and play it and LOVE it." And then the coup de grace. "THIS IS A BOOK CHILD! You need to use your IMAGINATION (because, poor boy, he doesn't have an imagination, staring at that TV screen all of the time, levelling his silly character up, taking arrows to the knee and whatnot.) All you need to play this game are two dice a pencil and paper (for mapping, and fuck you're gonna need it in this one...) So, our young ten year old regrets laughing in my face and wishes now that somehow things could have been different. He's got a lot of sidequests to be getting on with, frankly. Anyway, you know the score. Skill, Stamina, Luck. Skill fights monsters, Stamina is your health bar and you roll two dice and need to get under your Luck to get "Lucky" but careful, the more luck points you use, the harder it gets! Ingenious system. You walk down a passage way, do you go East or West? Turn to the appropriate paragraph. Do you go through that door soldier relentlessly on towards your goal (Which, incidentally, is killing the evil Warlock and taking his treasure, of course). Do you fight the monster or flee? The choices are seemingly endless, who needs open world MMOs when it's all contained in this one little book? Because, young ten year old, this is what a true adventuring quest looks like. A hidden mountain lair, populated by Orcs, Minotaurs, Zombies. There are rooms with traps, there are friendly dwarves joking and playing cards and of course there's the obligatory maze. It's all here and not a PS3 controller in sight. Just your IMAGINATION. Sure, there will be questions. Why can't I turn around and go back the way I just came? (because you fucking can't Okkk? That's the game.) Isn't it a bit unfair that if I miss one of the gazillion keys I can't win the game? (That's life kiddo, life isn't fair. Play through again and get it right this time!!) Why does the Maze of Zagor make no sense, it's actually unmappable? Why are there friendly Dwarves sitting playing cards in this maze? Why did the Warlock leave a powerful gem that can kill him lying around? Why is the Mazemaster such a fucking douche?? By now I'm sick of the ten of year old's questions. I want to be left in peace to play my GAME. I know games better than him, doesn't he understand this? I played this when I was a kid, it's brilliant. BRILLIANT I tell you. And yet he loses interest and goes off to play Skyrim. Apparently it's really cool and has dragons. I sit and play this for another few hours. Gotta get out of that motherfucking maze. Wish I could kill the Mazemaster. And where's that last goddamn key?? Brilliant. This book is amazing. If you want proof take a look at this Dragon. RAWR. I love Dragons (I killed him with a spell I found. That bastard went down good!) Buy it. Love it. Experience an amazing world. A book in which YOU are the HERO. I've still got another thousand million of them to play. Ironically I've also still got Skyrim to play. Who needs Skyrim when I have books though?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul Christensen

    The grim, spidery pictures and musty smell of the pages, The 'blue candle' room, snuffed-out nightmare from the ages; The deranged old man in his prison full of slime, The crazy maze of Zagor that enrages every time; The magic tools that hum a tune, and of course the 'stars and hands', The torture chamber, ghouls and wights: this gamebook launched the brand.

  8. 5 out of 5

    A.J.

    This is of course the 'original' fighting fantasy gaming book, the one that spawned a series of hundreds, not to mention all the copycats. As the first of them, it deserves a place of honour. It isn't perfect, but it doesn't have to be. Any RPGer worth their salt needs to have played this book/game.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Murray Dixon

    Full commentary at www.turnto400.blogspot.com Ultimately, "Warlock" comes off as a series of interesting but disconnected encounters playing out in a largely bland, unembellished environment. Firetop Mountain seems like dungeon equivalent of a newly completed office building, all fitted out but with scant contents and zero character. I never really had a coherent sense of what was happening or why. I found myself wondering how all of these creatures get by and what kind of relationships they have Full commentary at www.turnto400.blogspot.com Ultimately, "Warlock" comes off as a series of interesting but disconnected encounters playing out in a largely bland, unembellished environment. Firetop Mountain seems like dungeon equivalent of a newly completed office building, all fitted out but with scant contents and zero character. I never really had a coherent sense of what was happening or why. I found myself wondering how all of these creatures get by and what kind of relationships they have with each other. Does the VAMPIRE catch a ride with the FERRYMAN across the river when he wants to go to the candle shop? And does the FERRYMAN pull that same bullshit charging 3 gold pieces when the sign only says 2, or is that shit just for TOURISTS? What does the DRAGON eat? Does the MINOTAUR stay in the same room all day? Were all of these guys reporting to the Warlock? Did they have meetings? Where are the toilets? And so on. I shouldn't judge too harshly though - this is book #1, and 1982 was back in the early days of role-playing when corridors connecting a series of rooms containing monsters guarding boxes holding traps and/or treasure was what it was all about. Excepting the maze, it's pretty fun to play, and with a little charitable imagination you can imagine explanations for out-of-place stuff like the candle shop and the poker-playing midgets in the maze (oh, did I not mention them?) And the apparent incoherence of goings-on within the dungeon is fairly consistent with the notion that you're just some guy breaking and entering, which is exactly the case. And what's more of course, "Warlock" laid the foundation for a hell of a lot more to come...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Taddow

    This book started out pretty good but the later part with the maze soon became a grind and caused some frustration (I was even making maps to plot my progress and soon came to not caring about doing that). I actually (sad to say) had to get through by cheating on the maze part to find a pathway through by using a magical spell called "the Internet." But even with that success my adventure ended with failure as I defeated the Warlock but found only two of my three keys worked in his chest. Sadly, This book started out pretty good but the later part with the maze soon became a grind and caused some frustration (I was even making maps to plot my progress and soon came to not caring about doing that). I actually (sad to say) had to get through by cheating on the maze part to find a pathway through by using a magical spell called "the Internet." But even with that success my adventure ended with failure as I defeated the Warlock but found only two of my three keys worked in his chest. Sadly, frustrated and disgruntled I decided the dead Warlock could keep his treasure and headed out to seek another adventure. Despite my dismay with how the adventure turned out, I still gave this book 3 stars as I enjoyed what it was trying to do- a game book that was an invention for its time. I enjoyed the nostalgic feel of an old school D&D module that it had (where map-making was important) and the various rooms of monsters and encounters (many of which had no rhythm or reason). When reading these style game books I prefer more description and story (like the Lone Wolf books, the Car Wars and AD&D game books). I plan on trying more books in this series though.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The first Fighting Fantasy gamebook 9 June 2012 This is the first of the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks and I remember that it was first introduced to me in primary school as an offering in a book club. As soon as I read the blurb that said that it was a fantasy adventure in which you are the hero I immediately know that I wanted it and sure enough my parents bought it for me. Soon though, more began to appear on the shelves and I went out of my way to begin collecting them. There were originally 60 The first Fighting Fantasy gamebook 9 June 2012 This is the first of the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks and I remember that it was first introduced to me in primary school as an offering in a book club. As soon as I read the blurb that said that it was a fantasy adventure in which you are the hero I immediately know that I wanted it and sure enough my parents bought it for me. Soon though, more began to appear on the shelves and I went out of my way to begin collecting them. There were originally 60 gamebooks written but by the time 20 had been released many of us had drifted off to other interests (for me it was computer roleplaying games). These were not the first 'choose your own adventure' style books, they had been around for a while beforehand, but they were the first to use simple game mechanics (namely two dice, a pencil, and some paper) to add an element of chance. A number of other series, such as Grail Quest and Lone Wolf, also appeared, which included one that used coin tosses to add the element of chance (though I found the coin toss books to be somewhat difficult and frustrating, namely because I suck at tossing coins). While initially rolling the dice and running the books as an adventure where fun, in the end I tossed the dice out of the window (not literally – I'm a roleplayer so I need dice) and worked on the assumption that I would win every combat. Anyway, if I did lose a combat, I would simply start the combat all over again (as opposed to the entire book). This book is basically a dungeon crawl where you explore an underground complex and fight the nasty wizard at the end and steal his treasure. The story is very linear in that you cannot go back if you have missed something. The first part of the adventure is okay, as long as to go into every door, but all you have to do is to make one wrong turn and you will not know that you have made that wrong turn until you get to the end, kill the wizard, and discover that you do not have the keys to unlock the chest. One way to solve this problem is to make a map and to inscribe the paragraph number at every point where you make a major decision so that you can jump back there without having to slog all the way back through the book. One of the other oddities of these adventures is that it is not something you would do these days. It is automatically assumed that the wizard is bad, therefore breaking into his house, killing all his pets, killing him, and then stealing his treasure, is somehow considered to be okay. Not exactly the most healthy of things to be teaching children. I guess that breaking into the house of a drug lord, killing his guards, and then stealing his money, would, based on the premise of this book, be okay. However, society does not view it that way (or at least the government), even if the subject is a proven criminal. There is a system designed to deal with people like that, and if any bad person's possessions were up for grabs to the first person to kill them, then there would be anarchy. In any case, the only reason we believe that the warlock is bad is because it is hinted at, and he has a dungeon packed full of monsters. Anyway, just me musing once again about the disconnect between fantasy and reality, which does not necessarily mean that I didn't enjoy the book ( and a musing which no doubt will appear again in another gamebook).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Luís

    Not the BEST title but the FIRST! "The Warlock of Firetop Mountain" is an interesting gamebook with great moments and also frustrating scenes. It's not a elaborated game with complex story, I saw way much better in other titles of the series. I think this book was just a little experiment from the creators without exploiting the true potential of this kind of books. Difficulty is satisfying, but the book is full of uninteresting entries. There's to much direction choices like "If you want to go ea Not the BEST title but the FIRST! "The Warlock of Firetop Mountain" is an interesting gamebook with great moments and also frustrating scenes. It's not a elaborated game with complex story, I saw way much better in other titles of the series. I think this book was just a little experiment from the creators without exploiting the true potential of this kind of books. Difficulty is satisfying, but the book is full of uninteresting entries. There's to much direction choices like "If you want to go east go the number ###, if you want to go north go number ###"... this fact is even worse when the last part of the adventure is a maze. I stood one hour jumping entries and entries until I found the dragon's chamber. And even if you draw a map you'll have a hard time constructing the maze. The good moments are in the final boss fight, Zagor, the Warlock, a tough fight specially if your initial valors are to low. Another good moment is the river crossing... reminded me of Charon, the ferryman of the Underworld of Hades in Greek mythology. In overall is a good gamebook and if you start the first adventure in Fighting Fantasy series with it you'll be pleased... If this is not your first experience then you'll be disappointed by the lack of complexity.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Full playthrough and review at http://torallion.blogspot.com Very much a classic plot – adventurer enters dungeon for no particular reason other than to loot the place of all its treasure and become a hero. Forgiveable given this book’s status as the first Fighting Fantasy book, but perhaps having been spoiled by much less shallow plots in more recent gamebooks, it doesn’t grab me in the same way. For some this gamebook might represent a gateway to a much-loved hobby, but in my case it wasn’t the Full playthrough and review at http://torallion.blogspot.com Very much a classic plot – adventurer enters dungeon for no particular reason other than to loot the place of all its treasure and become a hero. Forgiveable given this book’s status as the first Fighting Fantasy book, but perhaps having been spoiled by much less shallow plots in more recent gamebooks, it doesn’t grab me in the same way. For some this gamebook might represent a gateway to a much-loved hobby, but in my case it wasn’t the first gamebook I played and therefore doesn’t make me all dewy-eyed with nostalgia. The writing is concise, with no unnecessary detail - The dungeon itself makes little sense, with magical items dotted around for no particular reason, and the keys to the Warlock’s chest scattered at random. However the advantage of the basic plot is its simplicity which makes it easy to play without having to remember all sorts of details. The artwork doesn’t always get across the dank atmosphere you would expect to experience in a dungeon of this kind and it’s a bit rough around the edges, but is very detailed and the familiar style does appeal to me. Gameplay is fairly straightforward – the player generally moves from room to room and has a series of discrete encounters, which when overcome reward the player with items which may or may not be useful for overall success. There are no situations where I felt unfairly punished for exploring – even wandering into a trap wasn’t too crippling, and none of the fights I was forced into were overly difficult (although the Iron Cyclops would have been impossible for a low-skill character and I think the true path requires you to fight him). I found the fact that I was forced to drop items at certain points in order to pick up others a little annoying, and this would have been downright frustrating had I really wanted to keep hold of everything. This rule made little sense in that there was no distinction between small and large items, so I could happily have left a key behind in order to pick up a shield, for instance. By the same token if I was carrying nothing but a key I would have been forced to do this. I guess this is a simplified way of forcing players to make decisions about what they carry, but I felt like a limited inventory size of 10 items or so would have been a better way to achieve this. Being partly an Ian Livingstone creation, this book bears his trademark in that there are certain paths you must take, and certain encounters you must have, or you cannot complete the adventure successfully. Sadly this also means that there are certain paths and encounters you cannot experience on your way to successful completion, as there is no way to go back to a previous junction and go the other way. This is, in one way, a shame, but when you do eventually find that true path, it makes it all the more satisfying. Overall this isn’t a difficult gamebook although the odds are against completing it on a first attempt, due to the fact that one of the required keys is easily missable by taking a wrong turn.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    I was a big fan of the Lone Wolf and TSR's Endless Quest books back when I was in elementary school, but it was only recently that I encountered Britain's venerable Fighting Fantasy series. It's very much a product of its time, but enjoyable nonetheless. Like Lone Wolf, these game books pair Choose Your Own Adventure style interactivity with a simple conflict resolution system. It requires the use of six-sided dice, unlike Lone Wolf (which uses a pencil and a printed grid in the book as its rando I was a big fan of the Lone Wolf and TSR's Endless Quest books back when I was in elementary school, but it was only recently that I encountered Britain's venerable Fighting Fantasy series. It's very much a product of its time, but enjoyable nonetheless. Like Lone Wolf, these game books pair Choose Your Own Adventure style interactivity with a simple conflict resolution system. It requires the use of six-sided dice, unlike Lone Wolf (which uses a pencil and a printed grid in the book as its randomizer), but it's clever and gets the job done. As a game book it's fairly fun, but I found the maze towards the end a little tedious, as mazes in text-based games always are. After several failed play-throughs I ended up using a map found online to get through it. The story itself is pretty sparse, basically a beginning and ending with many unconnected vignettes in between. This is par for the course with Dungeons & Dragons-inspired cave-crawling, where you're never sure what's in the next room and not much of an effort was made to come up with a unifying theme or sensible ecology. I grew up with this sort of thing, so I find it charming, but modern readers without this background might not understand the appeal. I look forward to playing through subsequent volumes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy Smith

    My childhood introduction into choose-your-own-adventures. I have so many fond memories of this book that it's no wonder that I got into Dungeons and Dragons as an adult. 10/10 for nostalgia

  16. 4 out of 5

    Redfox5

    When I was a kid I used to love those 'Give Yourself Goosebumps' Books where you could pick your own ending. I thought I would really like this as it's also a game. I started enthusiastically, made my own adventure sheet, read the rules etc. The problem started with the rules, they were not very clear. I wasn't sure if I was supposed to put my 10 meals in the 'Equipment Carried' column. And the Gold and Jewels columns were not really explained. I began the quest and somehow ended back at the sta When I was a kid I used to love those 'Give Yourself Goosebumps' Books where you could pick your own ending. I thought I would really like this as it's also a game. I started enthusiastically, made my own adventure sheet, read the rules etc. The problem started with the rules, they were not very clear. I wasn't sure if I was supposed to put my 10 meals in the 'Equipment Carried' column. And the Gold and Jewels columns were not really explained. I began the quest and somehow ended back at the start again, picked another option and encountered my first monster battle. I wasn't sure after you had the first roll if you were supposed to subtract points from the score you just had or go back to the original stamina score before the fight started. Then when I realised I would have to keep repeating this until one of us died, I decided to stop. I couldn't be bothered with doing that throughout the book. It just wasn't for me. I'm not sure how much appeal this kinda thing has to people nowadays. Do kids still like stuff like this? All I know is that I certainly don't!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Selby

    Due to Covid, I just finished rereading this book after an absence of 35 years. In fact this was the only book I never completed as a child due to getting hopelessly lost in the Maze of Zagor. It very nearly defeated me as an adult too but fortunately my mapmaking skills were a bit better this time around! I really enjoyed the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks as a child but if anyone is contemplating them for the first time I would recommend reading some of the later titles first as this is a tricky intr Due to Covid, I just finished rereading this book after an absence of 35 years. In fact this was the only book I never completed as a child due to getting hopelessly lost in the Maze of Zagor. It very nearly defeated me as an adult too but fortunately my mapmaking skills were a bit better this time around! I really enjoyed the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks as a child but if anyone is contemplating them for the first time I would recommend reading some of the later titles first as this is a tricky introduction to the series!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kushnuma

    This was a pretty fun book, as I was more involved. The battles were enjoyable too. Although I didn't manage to fully complete the quest.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark Aston

    If you like playing fantasy games, this is a great way to get into reading fantasy. You get to choose how the story ends, based on the choices that you make whilst reading.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This was the first book of the "Fighting Fantasy Gamebook" series, which was one of the most successful attempts at replicating role playing games in a solo environment prior to the technology which allowed computer games to take over this role. As a first book, however, it naturally had some bugs, which would be worked out in later additions to the series. This hasn't stopped it from being enormously popular, and spawning both a board game and a computer game. The basic premise of the book is th This was the first book of the "Fighting Fantasy Gamebook" series, which was one of the most successful attempts at replicating role playing games in a solo environment prior to the technology which allowed computer games to take over this role. As a first book, however, it naturally had some bugs, which would be worked out in later additions to the series. This hasn't stopped it from being enormously popular, and spawning both a board game and a computer game. The basic premise of the book is the classic "dungeon crawl" in which an adventurer must explore an underground maze, encountering increasingly powerful threats and finding useful items along the way. Most of these threats take the form of monsters, although there are some traps and navigational challenges as well, necessitating that the player create a map as he explores. The rules are essentially a stripped-down version of D&D as well, with the player "rolling up" some basic characteristics in order to resolve combat and other challenges, and starting out with potions that can restore lost attributes and provisions to restore hit points. The book is mostly linear, with only a few points of divergence from a predetermined path possible. The most obvious of these is the "maze," which is extremely difficult to map and resolve, and not much fun. In fact navigating my way through this has caused me to lose interest in the book more than once. Once you know it, of course, you can just turn to the entry at the end upon arriving there, but until you've searched every boring dead end, you can lose hours on entries that just say "You follow a long, narrow passageway which goes north, then west, then north again, and eventually you find yourself at a crossroads" and so on ad infinitum. The other weak spot is the lack of a sense of a bigger universe to contextualize this adventure. This is a common problem of "first books" as well - all the work that went into charting out this particular dungeon makes it feel as though it is all the writers were aware of. One side effect of this is the uselessness of the treasure, particularly the gold pieces you pick up. There's nothing (or almost nothing) in the dungeon to spend them on, so there's really no point in tracking how many you've gathered. As such, they make a fairly uninteresting reward. Most other treasures do allow you at least to escape a later threat more easily, and some are keys which will be needed to solve the final puzzle. The books got better over time, culminating in the brilliant "City of Thieves," but this one is of interest as an early effort.

  21. 5 out of 5

    QBD Books

    I was pretty chuffed when the old Fighting Fantasy books appeared in-store, repackaged for a new generation of warrior-wizardy-kids. I remember having a great time with this series, and the Warlock of Firetop Mountain kicked it all off. There really was nothing like it in the market. It combines Choose Your Own Adventure-style plot decision-making with a simplified Dungeons & Dragons-style solo gaming system. I can't wait to see more come out (especially the infamous Deathtrap Dungeon...). Great I was pretty chuffed when the old Fighting Fantasy books appeared in-store, repackaged for a new generation of warrior-wizardy-kids. I remember having a great time with this series, and the Warlock of Firetop Mountain kicked it all off. There really was nothing like it in the market. It combines Choose Your Own Adventure-style plot decision-making with a simplified Dungeons & Dragons-style solo gaming system. I can't wait to see more come out (especially the infamous Deathtrap Dungeon...). Great new artwork and design and all the thrills and spills of the original adventures.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Weathervane

    I'm not sure I could ever read another one of these books. I like the atmosphere and the dungeon-crawl approach, but almost everything is based on chance, and it just gets tedious. Lone Wolf blends gameplay with story; in Fighting Fantasy, story is slave to gameplay, and the game isn't that compelling. 7/15/18: Reread this bad boy last year (I believe), in the paperback form this time instead of Kindle, and it seems to have made all the difference. I genuinely enjoyed it and undertook multiple at I'm not sure I could ever read another one of these books. I like the atmosphere and the dungeon-crawl approach, but almost everything is based on chance, and it just gets tedious. Lone Wolf blends gameplay with story; in Fighting Fantasy, story is slave to gameplay, and the game isn't that compelling. 7/15/18: Reread this bad boy last year (I believe), in the paperback form this time instead of Kindle, and it seems to have made all the difference. I genuinely enjoyed it and undertook multiple attempts, mapping along the way. Much more game than story, as I stated in my old review, but it's a lot more entertaining when you're not constrained by a digital interface. I love how you can finish the book and feel a sense of satisfaction even without achieving the best and final ending. From another perspective I suppose it's also frustrating, since you come so close and lack only the proper keys. I still haven't completely beaten it. Regardless, the game feels fair without being too easy, and the paucity of instant-deaths in comparison to other, infuriating books in the series (ahem, Citadel of Chaos, you merciless bastard) impresses one with the feeling the author doesn't despise his audience, a very endearing quality for a book to have.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Graham

    I remember this as the first of the long-running FIGHTING FANTASY gamebooks that allowed kids to chart their own adventures in various fantasy worlds. Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone did themselves proud with this one; they essentially took a typical adventurers-explore-dungeon story and made it interactive years before computer games would reach the same level of realism. This tale is basic, but good. It has the elements that would become popularised later in the series: dungeons, traps, monst I remember this as the first of the long-running FIGHTING FANTASY gamebooks that allowed kids to chart their own adventures in various fantasy worlds. Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone did themselves proud with this one; they essentially took a typical adventurers-explore-dungeon story and made it interactive years before computer games would reach the same level of realism. This tale is basic, but good. It has the elements that would become popularised later in the series: dungeons, traps, monsters and seemingly endless doorways! I enjoyed playing it very much indeed, although I believe some of the sequels were superior. NB. On a new re-read of the book, I found myself stymised by the awful maze that makes up the latter part of the book. Unfortunately this drags the rating down a fair bit and I have no idea who thought it would be a good idea. It becomes a case of ending the adventure out of sheer frustration by throwing the book at the wall after going in circles for the 10th time...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Neil Thomson

    The game book that launched the Fighting a Fantasy series, Firetop Mountain not surprisingly drew on the fantasy genre to kick things off and has some nods to Tolkien and Dungeons and Dragons along the way. Whilst not a particularly difficult book in the series, this one is fun to map and was challenging due to one labyrinthine section. A must read for fans of FF Gamebooks for no other reason that it was where it all started. Jackson and Livingston returned to Firetop Mountain and the central vil The game book that launched the Fighting a Fantasy series, Firetop Mountain not surprisingly drew on the fantasy genre to kick things off and has some nods to Tolkien and Dungeons and Dragons along the way. Whilst not a particularly difficult book in the series, this one is fun to map and was challenging due to one labyrinthine section. A must read for fans of FF Gamebooks for no other reason that it was where it all started. Jackson and Livingston returned to Firetop Mountain and the central villain in Zagor in book 59 as a way to pay homage to the title where it all began.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    If the truth is to be known, these books are fun at first. Sadly, however, they quickly grow old. If you have experienced one of these kinds of books you have experienced them all. Whilst the stories differ, the effect they have upon a person is the same across the board. You have fun for a while and then they are put aside. It is okay to pick up one or two throughout your life but I would not recommend going out of your way to buy them en masse. As for which one(s) you pick up… well, that is a c If the truth is to be known, these books are fun at first. Sadly, however, they quickly grow old. If you have experienced one of these kinds of books you have experienced them all. Whilst the stories differ, the effect they have upon a person is the same across the board. You have fun for a while and then they are put aside. It is okay to pick up one or two throughout your life but I would not recommend going out of your way to buy them en masse. As for which one(s) you pick up… well, that is a choice only you can make.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kat Tastrophy

    Delve into a classic gamebook that exemplifies the fine art of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure (text adventure) and provides a simplistic roleplaying system to work with. My adventure session failed this time around because I missed one of the key three items needed to get what I wanted out of the Warlock once I slayed the annoying soul. But that is one grand factor about FF Gamebooks, the adventure never goes stale and your experience can vary enough to continue enjoying it the second, third or fourt Delve into a classic gamebook that exemplifies the fine art of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure (text adventure) and provides a simplistic roleplaying system to work with. My adventure session failed this time around because I missed one of the key three items needed to get what I wanted out of the Warlock once I slayed the annoying soul. But that is one grand factor about FF Gamebooks, the adventure never goes stale and your experience can vary enough to continue enjoying it the second, third or fourth play-through.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pete Murphy

    I bought this book in early 1983 (a year after release) and played it numerous times over the years* and yet I have never completed it. This time I had Skill (7), Stamina (19) and Luck (8) -obviously fate was against me and I failed again. I managed to get up to the Iron Cyclops before he defeated my weary self. I will leave it until early 2018 (35th Anniversary) to again enter the Mountain. Thanks to Michael Wall for getting me into Fighting Fantasy. *don't think I tried it during the 90s or 00s.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Russell

    I'm only going to rate one of these books as I believe I read all 59. They're basically a "Choose your own adventure" except you kill creatures in a lord of the rings-esque environment. From age 9 to 12 my life was consumed by these books. I would even draw a map using graph paper to further engross myself in the adventure. Man, I loved these books! Man, I was such a nerd!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Neil Hart

    Absolutely adored Steve Jackson's and Ian Livingstone's fighting fantasy 'game' books as a child. In fact, almost the only thing that ever came down off my otherwise packed and dusty bookcase - aside from a small but inspiring collection of 'Great Illustrated Classics' - ask my older brother! ;)).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I liked playing/reading this 'fighting fantasy' as a kid, at least I did until one of the pages fell out and got lost and completely ruined the game!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.