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The Opium Wars: A History From Beginning to End

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Opium Wars * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Violent confrontation between armed groups over the supply of illegal narcotics is something we commonly associate with criminal gangs in modern cities, but in the mid-nineteenth century Great Britain went to war with I Opium Wars * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Violent confrontation between armed groups over the supply of illegal narcotics is something we commonly associate with criminal gangs in modern cities, but in the mid-nineteenth century Great Britain went to war with Imperial China in order to continue to supply Chinese addicts with opium. The two wars which followed have become known as the Opium Wars, and they led to the utter defeat of China, the establishment of a British colony in Hong Kong, and the continuation of a narcotics trade that was worth millions of pounds each year to the British. The Opium Wars exposed the weaknesses of the Chinese Qing dynasty in terms of its military abilities and internal corruption. They also exposed divisions in Victorian Britain where people were beginning to question the morality of going to war to support an illegal narcotics trade which caused misery and death for millions of Chinese. In the end, the British were able to overcome their reservations and prosecuted these two wars with great success. British casualties were small and the gains enormous—the British opium trade to China would continue for more than fifty years after the end of the Second Opium War. Inside you will read about... ✓ The Joy Plant ✓ Outbreak of the First Opium War ✓ British Superiority and the Devil Ship ✓ The Treaty of Nanking: First of the Unequal Treaties ✓ The Inevitable Second Opium War ✓ The Fall of Beijing And much more! For the Chinese Qing dynasty, the Opium Wars marked the beginning of the end. Imperial China had endured for two thousand years, but within fifty years of the humiliations of the Opium Wars, a revolution overthrew the imperial court and turned China into a republic. Although they are little remembered today, the Opium Wars changed the face not just of China but also of the whole of Asia. This is the story of those wars.


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Opium Wars * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Violent confrontation between armed groups over the supply of illegal narcotics is something we commonly associate with criminal gangs in modern cities, but in the mid-nineteenth century Great Britain went to war with I Opium Wars * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Violent confrontation between armed groups over the supply of illegal narcotics is something we commonly associate with criminal gangs in modern cities, but in the mid-nineteenth century Great Britain went to war with Imperial China in order to continue to supply Chinese addicts with opium. The two wars which followed have become known as the Opium Wars, and they led to the utter defeat of China, the establishment of a British colony in Hong Kong, and the continuation of a narcotics trade that was worth millions of pounds each year to the British. The Opium Wars exposed the weaknesses of the Chinese Qing dynasty in terms of its military abilities and internal corruption. They also exposed divisions in Victorian Britain where people were beginning to question the morality of going to war to support an illegal narcotics trade which caused misery and death for millions of Chinese. In the end, the British were able to overcome their reservations and prosecuted these two wars with great success. British casualties were small and the gains enormous—the British opium trade to China would continue for more than fifty years after the end of the Second Opium War. Inside you will read about... ✓ The Joy Plant ✓ Outbreak of the First Opium War ✓ British Superiority and the Devil Ship ✓ The Treaty of Nanking: First of the Unequal Treaties ✓ The Inevitable Second Opium War ✓ The Fall of Beijing And much more! For the Chinese Qing dynasty, the Opium Wars marked the beginning of the end. Imperial China had endured for two thousand years, but within fifty years of the humiliations of the Opium Wars, a revolution overthrew the imperial court and turned China into a republic. Although they are little remembered today, the Opium Wars changed the face not just of China but also of the whole of Asia. This is the story of those wars.

30 review for The Opium Wars: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Greason

    An extremely short summary of the subject, and the briefness compels tremendous simplification of material. Even given that, a map or two would have been helpful, and some more discussion of the economic imperatives for both sides. Given those limitations, though, appears to be a relatively factual summary of the Opium Wars and the downfall of the Qing dynasty. The book comes off as rather biased against the Western powers but I think any honest treatment of the Opium Wars would necessarily do so An extremely short summary of the subject, and the briefness compels tremendous simplification of material. Even given that, a map or two would have been helpful, and some more discussion of the economic imperatives for both sides. Given those limitations, though, appears to be a relatively factual summary of the Opium Wars and the downfall of the Qing dynasty. The book comes off as rather biased against the Western powers but I think any honest treatment of the Opium Wars would necessarily do so -- even contemporary observers thought British behavior unjustifiable. Worth reading this or a longer topic; Chinese behavior in the modern world has some roots in the Opium wars -- both in the justifiable sense that they were ill-treated by Western powers, and in the tactic of treating diplomacy as nothing more than a tactic to buy time for military preparation, which certainly has continued.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Steinmetz

    Very well written! I enjoyed this very much. Concise, yet written in an engaging and interesting manner, it covers the period of the 1800s in which the Opium Wars took place, and discusses the reasons for the cause and end of those conflicts, ushering in the end of the Qing dynasty.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kong Kong

    a very concise history of the opium war but contains all the major facts and should be sufficient for those new to the subject a general impression on what happened less than 200 years ago, before china became the "yellow peril", "the sick man of asia", the chicom, the "chingchong laundrymen", etc. perhaps it might also help some readers understand what is currently happening in 2020, what with the "china virus", "unfair trading practices of china", "xinjiang concentration camp", etc. and why the a very concise history of the opium war but contains all the major facts and should be sufficient for those new to the subject a general impression on what happened less than 200 years ago, before china became the "yellow peril", "the sick man of asia", the chicom, the "chingchong laundrymen", etc. perhaps it might also help some readers understand what is currently happening in 2020, what with the "china virus", "unfair trading practices of china", "xinjiang concentration camp", etc. and why the chinese government, chinese citizens, and many people of chinese descent all over the world react to this new perceived humiliation the way they do. you might disagree in drawing a parallel between then and now, but history will no doubt one day tell whether you are on the right side of history today. disclaimer: i'm of chinese descent. i grew up hearing my elders talking about the opium wars and the 100 years of humiliation, every time i read this history my heart bleeds.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Raven Lancaster

    I had never even heard of the opium wars This waa not a topic we ever discussed in my school world history classes. This whole thing demonstrates the arrogance of the British Empire. Fighting a war over a horribly addictive drug just because they wanted the almighty buck and not caring who they were hurting. After all I've been reading about what was actually going on with the people and foreign affairs during the Victorian era I've reached the conclusion Victoria was a horrible, selfish ruler a I had never even heard of the opium wars This waa not a topic we ever discussed in my school world history classes. This whole thing demonstrates the arrogance of the British Empire. Fighting a war over a horribly addictive drug just because they wanted the almighty buck and not caring who they were hurting. After all I've been reading about what was actually going on with the people and foreign affairs during the Victorian era I've reached the conclusion Victoria was a horrible, selfish ruler and her parliament was even worse. On another note I'm pleased this one read like complete book by a single person instead of feeling poorly pieced together like the biography of Vlad the Impaler. The grammar skills still need work however and would benefit from a good editor.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ta0paipai

    Informative, Concise In less than an hour I went from knowing nothing of The Opium Wars to having a solid overview of the event. I'll echo some other reviewers complaints in that, some maps depicting where events took place (as described in the book) would help a great deal. Otherwise it was a quick, informative, well-written book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    j cannon

    I always wondered what the opium wars were all about Nicely concise description of the people, places, and things that caused the British to become the largest drug dealing cartel in the world, and create a crack like epidemic to profit from the misery of a foreign land.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Donigian

    The Colonial British Empire and China This is a little piece of history I was unaware of, I was aware of the Boxer Rebellion but the Opium Wars were far worse to China. Both took advantage of China's week navy, and Britain's strong navy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Misich

    A concise history This is a great concise history of both sides of the opium wars. I wish there was a little more of the Chinese perspective but overall if you're looking for an introduction. Check this out

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bern Callahan

    Clearly written and surprising. I certainly didn't know how badly the Western industrialized nations treated China in the mid 19th century. This is good background for understanding the flood of opiates entering the US and Canada from Asia.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sekhar N Banerjee

    An OK read Though the book has some historical inaccuracies, it clearly depicts the western nations as the biggest drug pushers in history. The author also very conveniently side tracks the destruction and looting of the Forbidden City by Lord Elgin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Well written and easy to read Excellent and brief review of the occupation of much of China and the forced addition of millions of China, primarilary by the British with involvement with French assistance. A shameful episode in British history.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lionkhan-sama

    Nice, concise and simple. Great history lesson right here!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Incredibly informative The author was brilliantly knowledgable, giving a great over view of the Opium wars. Looking forward to reading more of their work.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Johnson

    Very enjoyable and informative Easy to read, informative without being too confusing with all the names and chinese provinces and not too long would recommend

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tony DeBias

    Good Book One Very good and detailed short book on the Nasty British Imposition of the OPIUM trade on the Chinese people

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yogesh Wadhwa

    Good short introduction to Opium wars in East and South East Asia

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anil Swarup

    Another fascination offering from Hourly History. Succinct analyses of the events that led to the Opium Wars and the consequences thereof make the book eminently readable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    George Polansky

    A black mark in the history of England.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Highland

    This was a concise audiobook but gave a great foundation for the Opium Wars. You'll be conversational when finished, but not a fluent expert, which is a deep enough level for most people.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Patsy

    I learned about the wars that went on between different countries over opium and it all started before the Roman days an continued throughout the years. To name a few countries: England and China went to war India was involved in this war in the 1700's. As everyone knows it still going on today. I love history which is the reason I picked up this story on opium. I like these Hourly History ebooks. I learn so much in just a short time, Thanks for putting these out there for all of us.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Lowe

    A Remarkable Story,Told in an Exceptional Manner!!!! The book is a concise history of the First and Second Opium Wars between Britian and the Chinese Empire. The outcome of these wars was victory for Britain, the virtual destruction of China as a world power, and the creation of millions of drug addicts. You may well ask why a country that boasted of the “glorious traditions of the British Flag” came to fight a war not just on behalf of drug smugglers, but in order to force a sovereign nation to A Remarkable Story,Told in an Exceptional Manner!!!! The book is a concise history of the First and Second Opium Wars between Britian and the Chinese Empire. The outcome of these wars was victory for Britain, the virtual destruction of China as a world power, and the creation of millions of drug addicts. You may well ask why a country that boasted of the “glorious traditions of the British Flag” came to fight a war not just on behalf of drug smugglers, but in order to force a sovereign nation to accept the trade in narcotics. This enjoyable book tells the entire remarkable story of the Opium Wars and there impact on our world today. This book was professionally researched from numerous primary and secondary sources, written, and published by Hourly History. This publishing house has produced an extensive collection of thoroughly researched, concise, informative, and well written historical texts purposfully designed to be read in one to two hours. This historical collection is focused on chronicling the lives of important historical persons, key events, nations, and peoples. I have read a number of their offerings and found each volume well written, researched, informative and presented with an unbiased perspective.. This book provides an exceptional, straight forward account that is easy to read and understand. It was well researched and written. The narrative was engaging and enjoyable. The text explained the complex issues that led to the Opium Wars, the conduct of the wars, and the outcome of the British victory over China had on both Empires in a remarkably clear and understandable manner. Readers who enjoy history, or those who are interested in knowing more about the British Emp!ire in the 19th Century will enjoy this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert Inglis

  23. 4 out of 5

    karen kay paskon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Girishwar Chandpur

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth A Ashby

  26. 4 out of 5

    mark edwards

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joe Sharkey

  28. 5 out of 5

    Megan Stead

  29. 5 out of 5

    Keith Davis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dayo

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