free hit counter code Making Comics - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Making Comics

Availability: Ready to download

The bestselling, idiosyncratic curriculum from a 2019 MacArthur Fellow will teach you how to draw and write your story “The self-help book of the year.”—The New York Times Hello students, meet Professor Skeletor. Be on time, don’t miss class, and turn off your phones. No time for introductions, we start drawing right away. The goal is more rock, less talk, and we communicate The bestselling, idiosyncratic curriculum from a 2019 MacArthur Fellow will teach you how to draw and write your story “The self-help book of the year.”—The New York Times Hello students, meet Professor Skeletor. Be on time, don’t miss class, and turn off your phones. No time for introductions, we start drawing right away. The goal is more rock, less talk, and we communicate only through images. For more than five years the cartoonist Lynda Barry has been an associate professor in the University of Wisconsin–Madison art department and at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, teaching students from all majors, both graduate and undergraduate, how to make comics, how to be creative, how to not think. There is no academic lecture in this classroom. Doodling is enthusiastically encouraged. Making Comics is the follow-up to Barry's bestselling Syllabus, and this time she shares all her comics-making exercises. In a new hand-drawn syllabus detailing her creative curriculum, Barry has students drawing themselves as monsters and superheroes, convincing students who think they can’t draw that they can, and, most important, encouraging them to understand that a daily journal can be anything so long as it is hand drawn. Barry teaches all students and believes everyone and anyone can be creative. At the core of Making Comics is her certainty that creativity is vital to processing the world around us.


Compare
Ads Banner

The bestselling, idiosyncratic curriculum from a 2019 MacArthur Fellow will teach you how to draw and write your story “The self-help book of the year.”—The New York Times Hello students, meet Professor Skeletor. Be on time, don’t miss class, and turn off your phones. No time for introductions, we start drawing right away. The goal is more rock, less talk, and we communicate The bestselling, idiosyncratic curriculum from a 2019 MacArthur Fellow will teach you how to draw and write your story “The self-help book of the year.”—The New York Times Hello students, meet Professor Skeletor. Be on time, don’t miss class, and turn off your phones. No time for introductions, we start drawing right away. The goal is more rock, less talk, and we communicate only through images. For more than five years the cartoonist Lynda Barry has been an associate professor in the University of Wisconsin–Madison art department and at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, teaching students from all majors, both graduate and undergraduate, how to make comics, how to be creative, how to not think. There is no academic lecture in this classroom. Doodling is enthusiastically encouraged. Making Comics is the follow-up to Barry's bestselling Syllabus, and this time she shares all her comics-making exercises. In a new hand-drawn syllabus detailing her creative curriculum, Barry has students drawing themselves as monsters and superheroes, convincing students who think they can’t draw that they can, and, most important, encouraging them to understand that a daily journal can be anything so long as it is hand drawn. Barry teaches all students and believes everyone and anyone can be creative. At the core of Making Comics is her certainty that creativity is vital to processing the world around us.

30 review for Making Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Well...I finished reading this, but that's not really the point. This is Lynda Barry's actual course curriculum for making comics. Did I do any of the exercises? I did not. Will report back if/when I get laid off for coronavirus reasons.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charles Hatfield

    A trove of ideas and exercises, invaluable to teachers and students alike, and drawn and designed with Barry's expected handmade immediacy. Delightful to page through and learn from. More than simply a wonderful practical resource, this should be recognized as another installment in Barry's ongoing theorizing about the nature of storytelling and narrative drawing. She is on to something important.

  3. 4 out of 5

    M Aghazarian

    Lovely. Everyone can make comics

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    A treasure trove of inspiration, ideas, and creative play. I tend to love her books, so was not surprised that this one delighted me. This is the curriculum for a class she teaches, but don't be fooled by the title. It's is not just for people interested in making comics, but for anyone interested in paying deeper attention to one's daily life. I am so inspired, and might actually bump this up a star once I go back through and actually do the exercises.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    There's definitely some overlap with Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor, but Making Comics has many, many more exercises for, you guessed it, making comics. There's definitely some overlap with Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor, but Making Comics has many, many more exercises for, you guessed it, making comics.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Linda Robinson

    Superb book. Open it anywhere, and you will find an exercise to get your creative mojo bossa novaing. Drawing with your eyes closed, with both hands simultaneously. Story prompts that will launch a new adventure you didn't know you were going to have. Your drawings can meet you. The whole book is a comics practice, with supplies recommended (I need to get a Staedtler nonphoto blue pencil). In fact, the book is drawn as a composition book. Meta engaging. The book is also a creative practice. Wheth Superb book. Open it anywhere, and you will find an exercise to get your creative mojo bossa novaing. Drawing with your eyes closed, with both hands simultaneously. Story prompts that will launch a new adventure you didn't know you were going to have. Your drawings can meet you. The whole book is a comics practice, with supplies recommended (I need to get a Staedtler nonphoto blue pencil). In fact, the book is drawn as a composition book. Meta engaging. The book is also a creative practice. Whether you want to make comics, write fiction or nonfiction, paint with watercolor, mud or celestial dust, there is something in this magic book that will start you on the journey. I already recommended it to one person who asked what book I thought an arty youngster might enjoy, and to a friend who thought her grown comics son might like it, too. Whatever level of skill, age, or dimension - this book is a carnival of ideas.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Fabulous. Good chance I bump this up to 5 stars after I do the exercises. One tiny gripe: she lists some needed supplies at the beginning but not all of them. For example, she doesn’t tell you to procure a non-photo-blue pencil until the exercise it’s needed in. Perhaps I’ll update this review with a comprehensive supplies list once I’ve made it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    TaraShea Nesbit

    I love this book. You might think it is about making comics, but it is also about attending to yourself and the world, about making a life and holding on to that 4 y/o self's imagination, warbly line, expression.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    This is such an interesting, inspiring, insightful book. I appreciate both the specific drawing and writing exercises in it as well as Barry’s own musings on and explanations of the relationships between drawing, creativity, images, and the mind. There’s great stuff here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Story

    With each book, Barry further refines her thinking and teaching. I loved reading this and will continue to practice the exercises--not only the art exercises, but also the way of thinking and noticing and being.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    Loved this and hope I can get myself to start on the exercises soon!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    Excellent excellent excellent. I enjoyed this so much. It's a teaching memoir; a philosophy of comics, teaching, and art; an exercise book; a classroom textbook. Barry does so many things in just 200 pages, and I found myself inspired on multiple levels. I'm looking forward to sharing this one with friends. While I am one of those people who have "given up on art," I think I'll try my hand at these exercises! At this point in my life, I give no sh*ts if something is "good" or "bad." So it should Excellent excellent excellent. I enjoyed this so much. It's a teaching memoir; a philosophy of comics, teaching, and art; an exercise book; a classroom textbook. Barry does so many things in just 200 pages, and I found myself inspired on multiple levels. I'm looking forward to sharing this one with friends. While I am one of those people who have "given up on art," I think I'll try my hand at these exercises! At this point in my life, I give no sh*ts if something is "good" or "bad." So it should be fun.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tena Edlin

    I finally finished the latest Lynda Barry book, and it is full of great activities and lessons for me to use in my Cartoons, Comics, and Graphic Novels unit. She has such a great way of making everyone feel like an artist and helping everyone channel that creative, fearless child in all of us. This book made me think of how I can reintroduce journaling back into my GOAL classes, but in a different way.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    Kids love to draw, and are exuberant about depicting their world and imagination in pencil and crayons. Most adults give up drawing, thinking they're "no good at it." Lynda Barry has created a book for these drawing-averse adults, hoping to help them recapture the joy of the hobby. For that audience, I give this one 5 stars. For myself, I have never given up drawing, so I don't really need that constant goading, BUT there are some great ideas for drawing and story prompts here!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    WSJ list of diverting books: "This combination of memoir and cartoon-drawing workbook is perfect just to read, but even more fun if you’ve ever desired to learn to draw. Who better to guide you than Lynda Barry, the legendary cartoonist always attuned to finding beauty in even the ugliest of sketches?"

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cory Busse

    This is a terrific book. For anyone who's ever wanted to write. To draw. It's a stylized and densely populated primer on both. It's as much a joy to look at as it is to read, and even if you never do a single one of the dozens (hundreds?) of exercises in it, you'll appreciate how much love went into crafting them, and how much fun you might have if you decided to try. This is a keeper to go back to again and again for inspiration, to get creatively unstuck or just to mix up the doodles that you' This is a terrific book. For anyone who's ever wanted to write. To draw. It's a stylized and densely populated primer on both. It's as much a joy to look at as it is to read, and even if you never do a single one of the dozens (hundreds?) of exercises in it, you'll appreciate how much love went into crafting them, and how much fun you might have if you decided to try. This is a keeper to go back to again and again for inspiration, to get creatively unstuck or just to mix up the doodles that you're making while you're ignoring all those Zoom calls.

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    Tremendous inspiration for anyone interested in doodling with comics. Lynda Barry provides a range of fun, engaging creative exercises. More than that, though, she shares her passion for the medium itself, evoking the magic that can be made with little scribbles.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    I read an earlier collection of comics by Lynda Barry that I didn't particularly enjoy. Nothing wrong with it — just not my style or something I could relate to. But at the same time that I reserved that book at the library, I also reserved Making Comics, so when it came in, I decided to check it out and give it a go. I'm glad I did because it's nothing like the other book and had content that I didn't expect. It seems Ms. Barry teaches (or has taught) courses in cartooning for complete beginners I read an earlier collection of comics by Lynda Barry that I didn't particularly enjoy. Nothing wrong with it — just not my style or something I could relate to. But at the same time that I reserved that book at the library, I also reserved Making Comics, so when it came in, I decided to check it out and give it a go. I'm glad I did because it's nothing like the other book and had content that I didn't expect. It seems Ms. Barry teaches (or has taught) courses in cartooning for complete beginners at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and this book served as a textbook for that course. The book contains very little about how to master the techniques of drawing. In the beginning, the author discusses the way young children draw and how they sometimes assign meanings to what they draw after they've drawn it. She believes that drawing is a language that we all have within us that is largely untapped. Her objective is to get people to express themselves freely, without letting technical precision get in the way. As a starting point, if a person's drawing skill is still so primitive that he (or she) can draw only stick figures, she suggests drawing a larger round shape for a head and a stumpier shape for a body so it has some substance, and sticks for arms and legs. That way there's something to decorate. There are many increasingly challenging exercises in the book, most of them timed, starting with free drawing, and working up to developing a whole cartoon with covers and a story inside. I didn't do any of the exercises because I'm not taking any such course and it's not my objective to learn to draw cartoons. (Ironically, I used to do a bit of cartooning, and it was actually pretty funny, but for whatever reasons, life got in the way, and it's been a very long time since I've even tried. Maybe I should try again!) I greatly enjoyed Ms. Barry's approach in this book. Her idea is not to develop professional cartoonists or animators or illustrators but to teach students that they can use drawing as a regular tool in their lives to express things they want to say. (The example of local hero James Thurber comes to mind.)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Devin

    I read a review about this book, Making Comics, (I can’t remember where the review came from!) and it said that it was perfect if you were needing a pick-me-up regarding your creativity. Or something like that...if you were stuck, get it...it’s good for anyone who is creative. Lynda Barry is an art professor at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. She specializes in comics. The book read like a comic but also like a syllabus, a hand-drawn one!, and a very little bit like a journal article. Ba I read a review about this book, Making Comics, (I can’t remember where the review came from!) and it said that it was perfect if you were needing a pick-me-up regarding your creativity. Or something like that...if you were stuck, get it...it’s good for anyone who is creative. Lynda Barry is an art professor at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. She specializes in comics. The book read like a comic but also like a syllabus, a hand-drawn one!, and a very little bit like a journal article. Barry gave drawing and writing exercises for you to try, along with some examples. She told you the best pens and the best paper for certain exercises, and she talked about how fun it is to draw with little kids because they aren’t afraid of doing it “wrong” which is what plagues adults. The book encourages the Ivan Brunetti style. There was a label on the back that said something similar to “Thinking about giving it another try?” meaning drawing…. I don’t have a desire to make comics, but I would love to get past the idea of doing it (life) wrong. Don’t tell her but I am getting this book for my mom for her birthday. I don’t think she’s stuck artistically, but the exercises seemed fun and interesting. I guess I’ll buy the book for myself when I retire. I think older kids would like it, too….maybe 6th grade + << they’d have to be a self-starter.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Doctor Moss

    Just to get the record straight, I admit I bought this book to have a look at it before committing myself to actually going through it and doing any of the exercises. I wanted to get a feel for it, and I wanted to see if it inspired me. I’m one of the people Lynda Barry seems to prefer as students, somebody who doesn’t know how to draw, thinks they never could draw, and would never want anybody to see any of the demented chicken scratchings they produced and dared to call “drawings.” Her book did Just to get the record straight, I admit I bought this book to have a look at it before committing myself to actually going through it and doing any of the exercises. I wanted to get a feel for it, and I wanted to see if it inspired me. I’m one of the people Lynda Barry seems to prefer as students, somebody who doesn’t know how to draw, thinks they never could draw, and would never want anybody to see any of the demented chicken scratchings they produced and dared to call “drawings.” Her book did light a fire, a little one maybe, but big ones start out as little ones. Her approach is improvisational — don’t think too much, just draw and don’t stop. Lessons are timed, and part of the object is to draw fast, don’t plan, and see what happens. Even when she gets to building stories, the idea is the same. Draw a frame, then, what happens next? Don’t plan it out. A story that follows a script you thought out ahead of time is boring. And, above all, don’t worry about whether or not your drawings and your stories are good. Just keep going. It sounds like fun, but it’s challenging. By the way, you’ll need a decent amount of supplies — particular types of pens, crayons, particular types of paper, a composition book, a “non-photo blue pencil,” index cards. Might be good to get those together before starting.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Scott

    Who knew a second Making Comics, after the masterwork original by Scott McCloud, could be so good? Because Lynda Barry's book about, well, making comics, just flows. It's also very different, with a focus on creativity that complements McCloud's technical depth. +++ Course about making comics? Sign me up! + Idiosyncratic style. So you won't even dream about copying the style, just the ideas about comics. +++ Creativity, creativity, creativity. The whole teaching process is structured around creati Who knew a second Making Comics, after the masterwork original by Scott McCloud, could be so good? Because Lynda Barry's book about, well, making comics, just flows. It's also very different, with a focus on creativity that complements McCloud's technical depth. +++ Course about making comics? Sign me up! + Idiosyncratic style. So you won't even dream about copying the style, just the ideas about comics. +++ Creativity, creativity, creativity. The whole teaching process is structured around creative exercises. ++ Teaching method focuses on rewarding, beginner-friendly exercises. This is the complete opposite, and a complement to, Scott McCloud's much more technical, even academic approach. I like them both, but for different reasons.

  22. 4 out of 5

    musicologyduck

    Glad to be reading this after taking one of Prof. Barry's daylong workshops—many of these exercises are best done with other people, and the element of surprise when she teaches them is harder to reproduce when you read all of the instructions first. (For some of the exercises this doesn't matter, but for a few, not anticipating the second step is part of the fun.) A few of the exercises will also be familiar to readers of her other books, but it's interesting to see how some have evolved or how Glad to be reading this after taking one of Prof. Barry's daylong workshops—many of these exercises are best done with other people, and the element of surprise when she teaches them is harder to reproduce when you read all of the instructions first. (For some of the exercises this doesn't matter, but for a few, not anticipating the second step is part of the fun.) A few of the exercises will also be familiar to readers of her other books, but it's interesting to see how some have evolved or how they fit in this context. There are also lots of new exercises and variations! But the best part, as always, is how she shows the power of images and theorizes about them in an incredibly accessible and multimodal way.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    A guide to developing ideas for stories, fiction and non-fiction, using pictures as the primary way to tell them, and based on a cartooning class she's taught for years. Aimed at people who have given up on drawing even for fun, Barry emphasizes spontaneity over draftsmanship and technique, using techniques to spur creativity, and teaches how to play with one's creations so that the methods practiced always remains fun. (Her earlier book, "100 Demons!," is about how she went about recapturing th A guide to developing ideas for stories, fiction and non-fiction, using pictures as the primary way to tell them, and based on a cartooning class she's taught for years. Aimed at people who have given up on drawing even for fun, Barry emphasizes spontaneity over draftsmanship and technique, using techniques to spur creativity, and teaches how to play with one's creations so that the methods practiced always remains fun. (Her earlier book, "100 Demons!," is about how she went about recapturing the joy in cartooning she had lost.) The book is funny, imaginative, filled will examples from former students, and has suggestions for keeping the imaginative pump primed that anybody from amateur to professional can benefit from.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Octavia Cade

    Not quite for me - or I should say, it wasn't quite what I was looking for. I really enjoy Barry's work, and I sort of had the idea that this was more about writing comics than drawing comics. Of course the two are very closely connected, especially in Barry's case, but I needed more of a "how to construct a comic or graphic novel" than I needed a "drawing is fun and you can do it!" tutorial. Which is what this is. It's constructed lesson plans, full of exercises which budding comic artists can Not quite for me - or I should say, it wasn't quite what I was looking for. I really enjoy Barry's work, and I sort of had the idea that this was more about writing comics than drawing comics. Of course the two are very closely connected, especially in Barry's case, but I needed more of a "how to construct a comic or graphic novel" than I needed a "drawing is fun and you can do it!" tutorial. Which is what this is. It's constructed lesson plans, full of exercises which budding comic artists can do, and it's fun and accessible but I have to say, if I were ever to take this class, I'd end up having nightmares about the phrase "draw a full body portrait!" because it's only repeated about seven thousand times and sometimes, as a comic reader, only close-ups will do.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Didn't like this book as much as Syllabus, but that's probably because I'm not interested in making comics, but rather in using some of Barry's ideas to get a creative journal practice started. One idea I like here, also in her other book, is the daily diary. That's something I can see easily leading to other projects, both visual and narrative. I don't know if I'll use anything from this book with my students, but I am thinking just now of a very talented student artist who might enjoy working Didn't like this book as much as Syllabus, but that's probably because I'm not interested in making comics, but rather in using some of Barry's ideas to get a creative journal practice started. One idea I like here, also in her other book, is the daily diary. That's something I can see easily leading to other projects, both visual and narrative. I don't know if I'll use anything from this book with my students, but I am thinking just now of a very talented student artist who might enjoy working his way through this book. Now reading What It Is, the most recently published Barry book on this mindmeld between the unconscious, memories, and creativity.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alodie Larochelle

    I'm by no means done my journey with this book, but I've read it from cover to cover and dog-eared every exercise I want to try. I've been feeling not ready to move on to the next lessons in Ivan Brunetti's Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice, and I'm optimistic that the exercises in Barry's book are the bridge I need before moving on to more demanding lessons in Cartooning by Brunetti. I'm especially grateful for the variations on diary comic formats. I've been getting kind of sick of four-pane I'm by no means done my journey with this book, but I've read it from cover to cover and dog-eared every exercise I want to try. I've been feeling not ready to move on to the next lessons in Ivan Brunetti's Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice, and I'm optimistic that the exercises in Barry's book are the bridge I need before moving on to more demanding lessons in Cartooning by Brunetti. I'm especially grateful for the variations on diary comic formats. I've been getting kind of sick of four-panel diary comics after doing them for about a month. Weirdly more syllabus-like than her book Syllabus, which is not what I expected but may be what I need.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Quinn

    Lynda Barry has written two books (that I know of), both in comic form. The first was a syllabus she created for her Wisconsin University class. Visual Thinking is a new skill, and Barry is riding a wave of creativity, thoughtful projects, and fun. This book is a class on making comics (of serious topics, too) told in comic book form. You don't have to read the book in order, you can open any page and do the exercises. They are inventive, creative, and fun. And they work. A book not to miss.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Desiree Sotomayor

    For some reason I couldn't get quite as into this one as her other titles, the exercises didn't seem as accessible and there were so so many of them, which I suppose is great if you're a serious creator. Also a few of the exercises probably work better if you are in a group setting. "What it is" is still one of my top 5 influential books, which I am always recommending to people. I might give this one a try again, though it is just way more specific and specialized than "What it is" for me right For some reason I couldn't get quite as into this one as her other titles, the exercises didn't seem as accessible and there were so so many of them, which I suppose is great if you're a serious creator. Also a few of the exercises probably work better if you are in a group setting. "What it is" is still one of my top 5 influential books, which I am always recommending to people. I might give this one a try again, though it is just way more specific and specialized than "What it is" for me right now.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dan Clark

    I read and discuss a lot of comics but still find it hard to fully quantify what this is in a way that does it justice. By breaking comics down to their most rudimentary elements and gradually build in complexity it demonstrates the language as an art form. It studies the relationship between the written word and the visual image and how this artform can strengthen both. One of the more inventive approaches to how to create and construct a comic I read this year.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jane Somers

    I love everything about this book, and yet I feel panicked at the thought of trying to do the exercises. Ms Barry says the people who think they can't draw do the most original work, so we'll see. I love her description of children's drawings changing from one thing into another, surprising the child doing the drawing, and her general advice to let the drawing go where it wants to go and surprise you.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.