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Thor is back! And in a story only J. Michael Straczynski could tell! Returned to the pantheon of great Marvel heroes, the Asgardian God of Thunder is reunited with the mortal form of Dr. Don Blake. Together, they must reckon with the legacy of the mythic Norse kingdom and the awakening of its immortal heroes – but in a world that may not want them back!


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Thor is back! And in a story only J. Michael Straczynski could tell! Returned to the pantheon of great Marvel heroes, the Asgardian God of Thunder is reunited with the mortal form of Dr. Don Blake. Together, they must reckon with the legacy of the mythic Norse kingdom and the awakening of its immortal heroes – but in a world that may not want them back!

30 review for Thor: Reborn

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Ok, I'm a little surprised that I liked this as much as I did, because...well, it's Thor. Now, I've always liked him in the Avengers, but I wasn't sure how well that would translate into his own comic (for me, anyway). I mean, he wears a helmet with wings on it, for God's sake. Not teeny-tiny wings, either. Huge I-Believe-I-Can-Fly wings. Wings. On. His. Helmet. Alright, I'm getting off the subject. The story line was actually really good! I'm sure I didn't catch every subtle reference in the s Ok, I'm a little surprised that I liked this as much as I did, because...well, it's Thor. Now, I've always liked him in the Avengers, but I wasn't sure how well that would translate into his own comic (for me, anyway). I mean, he wears a helmet with wings on it, for God's sake. Not teeny-tiny wings, either. Huge I-Believe-I-Can-Fly wings. Wings. On. His. Helmet. Alright, I'm getting off the subject. The story line was actually really good! I'm sure I didn't catch every subtle reference in the story, because (as I mentioned before) I am not well versed in this particular character. However, even though this isn't an Origin story, it is a Starting-Over story, so it's easy enough to follow that you don't need to be an expert in Thor to get the gist of it. (And really, how many of us are experts when it comes to Thor?) Side note: I still don't know how in the world they plan on selling Thor to the general public when this movie comes out. Pssst! Ix-nay on the ings-way, Hollywood!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    3.5 stars Although it won't supplant Thor, The Mighty Avenger: Complete Collection by Langridge / Samnee (much recommended - I really loved that book!) as my favorite tome featuring the Son of Odin, Straczynski's Thor, Vol. 1 certainly had its moments. Between the numerous action scenes and the gentle humor of Thor moving the kingdom of Asgard to America's heartland, there was a great moment in the exact middle of the volume. Dr. Don Blake (Thor's human alter ego) is participating in a noble Doct 3.5 stars Although it won't supplant Thor, The Mighty Avenger: Complete Collection by Langridge / Samnee (much recommended - I really loved that book!) as my favorite tome featuring the Son of Odin, Straczynski's Thor, Vol. 1 certainly had its moments. Between the numerous action scenes and the gentle humor of Thor moving the kingdom of Asgard to America's heartland, there was a great moment in the exact middle of the volume. Dr. Don Blake (Thor's human alter ego) is participating in a noble Doctors Without Borders mission in the wilds of Africa when the refugee camp is viciously attacked by guerrillas. He transforms into Thor and then literally "calls down the thunder" (to quote Kurt Russell as Wyatt Earp in Tombstone), and is also assisted by three stalwart but modest soldiers-for-hire who are providing security for said camp. What happens next to the trio - in response to Thor admiring their bravery in the face of unenviable odds - is my favorite scene in the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    When I was kid in a small town in the ’70s long before I’d heard of comic book stores, and the idea that I would one day be able to order collections of comics via a computer and have it delivered to my doorstep would have seemed like something from a sci-fi story, my only steady source of superhero goodness was at my local grocery store. The problem was that the store only sold Marvel comics as a 3-pack sealed in a plastic bag. I was allowed to get one of these packs a week. (I think they sold When I was kid in a small town in the ’70s long before I’d heard of comic book stores, and the idea that I would one day be able to order collections of comics via a computer and have it delivered to my doorstep would have seemed like something from a sci-fi story, my only steady source of superhero goodness was at my local grocery store. The problem was that the store only sold Marvel comics as a 3-pack sealed in a plastic bag. I was allowed to get one of these packs a week. (I think they sold for 99 cents. Compare that to today‘s prices and weep, my fellow comic nerds.) I got a lot of great stuff this way, including the first Daredevil that Frank Miller drew. The downside was that the two outer issues would be something like Spider-Man or Captain America, you could never tell what the one in the middle would be. It was almost always a dud, at least for my taste. I’m pretty sure that the lower selling books were getting hidden between two more popular books. My bitterest disappointment always came when there was a Thor as that third comic. It was like eating an Oreo but having crap in in the middle instead of a cream center. I had no interest in stories about gods fighting on rainbow bridges or whatever the hell they were supposed to be doing. Through the years, Thor remained one of my least favorite heroes. But I actually enjoyed the movie version that came out earlier this year, and I’m completely geeking out for Joss Whedon’s upcoming Avengers movie that Thor will be a part of so it seemed like a good time to give it another try. This collection where J. Michel Straczynski brought the ole thunder god back to the Marvel universe after an absence seemed like a good place to start. JMS has Thor reuniting with his old human persona Doctor Donald Blake and returning to Earth. The first order of business is rebuilding Asgard in the middle of Oklahoma. Which causes a few zoning issues with the locals as well as some diplomatic problems with the U.S. government. Then Thor sets out to locate the other Norse legends who have been trapped in their own human forms. One of my favorite parts concerns a meeting with Iron Man. This occurs at the height of Marvel’s Civil War when Tony Stark as being kind of an a-hole. When he tries to play the role of the Big Cheese, Thor gives him a hard lesson in the difference between a god and a rich dude in a metal suit. Good, fun stuff that has me looking forward to the rest of this series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Okay so here we go. Another Thor first volume. This time I went back, past Jason Aaron to J. Michael Stacynski run and...well it's actually pretty fun! Thor has returned to earth after being in the void for so long. His human like vessle (I'm a bit confused by this Blake stuff myself. Sorry, not big into Thor) and so he returns. However, coming back to earth he sees that Asgard is no more and all his people are gone. So he slowly begins to awaken his friends in various places around the world to Okay so here we go. Another Thor first volume. This time I went back, past Jason Aaron to J. Michael Stacynski run and...well it's actually pretty fun! Thor has returned to earth after being in the void for so long. His human like vessle (I'm a bit confused by this Blake stuff myself. Sorry, not big into Thor) and so he returns. However, coming back to earth he sees that Asgard is no more and all his people are gone. So he slowly begins to awaken his friends in various places around the world to bring them back and restore Asgard. On top of that Tony decides to pay his buddy a visit but this is after Civil War. Yes, the same Civil War Thor build a robot like Thor to kill people. Yeah...shit is about to go down. Good: The thor vs iron-man issue, or should say, Thor smacking Iron-man down issue, is great. Pure emotion, awesome effects, epic as fuck, and Thor comes across as a mighty god. I also enjoyed him picking up the pieces of his life and trying to restore it all. Bad: The ending was kind of getting boring (Until last two pages) and Loki coming back as a woman, while cool, was kind of just why? Like, we know Loki will betray again so why the fuck does Thor keep trying him? Overall this is a really solid volume. It didn't blow me away or anything but I had a lot of fun reading it and will give the rest of this run a read for sure. A 3.5 out of 5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Thor, Vol. 1 !!! In the movies, Thor is one of my favorite people. So when I saw this volume on Prime Reading. I HAD TO HAVE IT.   I loved this way more than I expected. Seriously, it was so good. I loved the stories, every one of them, I just love the characters. I wanted some Sif. I LOVE SIF. But even though she wasn't around, she got mentioned lots and that gave me all the feels. Ooops.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    I was mildly entertained until about halfway into this collection, where it picked up when Thor confronts Ironman. Call me shallow, but I mostly know these guys through the recent movies and I dig Robert Downey Jr. Thor's outfit is the hardest to get used to. I know, it's the original one, but I have Chris Hemsworth stuck on my brain, without the dorky helmet. So, comic... I like the vibrant colours and the artwork in general. The story, as mentioned, is mildly entertaining. The plot is ok, but no I was mildly entertained until about halfway into this collection, where it picked up when Thor confronts Ironman. Call me shallow, but I mostly know these guys through the recent movies and I dig Robert Downey Jr. Thor's outfit is the hardest to get used to. I know, it's the original one, but I have Chris Hemsworth stuck on my brain, without the dorky helmet. So, comic... I like the vibrant colours and the artwork in general. The story, as mentioned, is mildly entertaining. The plot is ok, but not something terribly intricate or exciting. My interest picked up with book 3, when Ironman is introduced into the storyline. My favourite part was the epilogue. Recommended to readers with prior knowledge of Marvel comics and Thor. I would read another copy, if I got my hands on it cheaply.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    In five years of catching up on all the glories if the Marvel universe, I've paid no attention whatsoever to Thor or Straczynski. Much to my chagrin, this is a great story - a clever and believable way to reboot the ancient and crufty Thor/Marvel mythology, a well as a very enjoyable and rewarding read. Some very funny moments in the writing and the art. Oh yes, the art. Not the hyper-realistic stuff of the most epic Captain America, but the slightly exaggerated approach is very well executed, a In five years of catching up on all the glories if the Marvel universe, I've paid no attention whatsoever to Thor or Straczynski. Much to my chagrin, this is a great story - a clever and believable way to reboot the ancient and crufty Thor/Marvel mythology, a well as a very enjoyable and rewarding read. Some very funny moments in the writing and the art. Oh yes, the art. Not the hyper-realistic stuff of the most epic Captain America, but the slightly exaggerated approach is very well executed, and quite well fleshed-out in most places. A great style for this larger-than-life tale. If this is the calibre of work Straczynski is capable of, then I'll be reading all the stuff he's poured out the last few years.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terence

    Thor has returned to life after the fall of Asgard because of Ragnorak and he intends to defend the Earth while restoring Asgard. It seems the world wasn't done with Thor after all and he's returned to set things right as best as he can. First off he has a discussion with Tony Stark regarding using his DNA to clone him. The God of Thunder made sure his point got across. Personally I find Thor bland and because of that I wasn't particularly into reading his return. It's not bad, but not really some Thor has returned to life after the fall of Asgard because of Ragnorak and he intends to defend the Earth while restoring Asgard. It seems the world wasn't done with Thor after all and he's returned to set things right as best as he can. First off he has a discussion with Tony Stark regarding using his DNA to clone him. The God of Thunder made sure his point got across. Personally I find Thor bland and because of that I wasn't particularly into reading his return. It's not bad, but not really something I'd normally choose to spend my time on.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    I love this. These 6 issues of Thor are amazing. The art by Coipel is something else and JMS manages to bring Thor back in to the modern MU that makes sense and is in keeping with the current continuity. A lot of what's here made it into the first Thor film, and it's easy to see why. Damn good comics.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James

    3.5 stars. And enjoyable volume. Really liked the meet up between Thor and Iron man. Yeah what Tony did with Thor’s dna in Civil War was pretty jacked up so I understand Thor’s anger. Epic sequence there. Also Coipels art is awesome. I was a little lost as to why Thor was in this void, why Asgard needed rebuilding and why and the Asgardians were gone which took a little away from the story. I guess I’ll be doing some research on where to find where all that went down. Anyway like I said, not perf 3.5 stars. And enjoyable volume. Really liked the meet up between Thor and Iron man. Yeah what Tony did with Thor’s dna in Civil War was pretty jacked up so I understand Thor’s anger. Epic sequence there. Also Coipels art is awesome. I was a little lost as to why Thor was in this void, why Asgard needed rebuilding and why and the Asgardians were gone which took a little away from the story. I guess I’ll be doing some research on where to find where all that went down. Anyway like I said, not perfect but still liked it and I’m looking forward to the next book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    When it comes to the Marvel Superheroes I am far more '70's & '80's orientated and to be honest Thor did not figure on my radar. However my oldest daughter pushed me in seeing both Thor movies and I must say that I kind of enjoyed both of them and found them palatable. Thor in this comic, bought by me for the daughter in question, tickled my interest and I kind of took it upon my self to read it. Thor and Asgard have fallen after Ragnarok and are no longer in existence. And as anything in MARVEL When it comes to the Marvel Superheroes I am far more '70's & '80's orientated and to be honest Thor did not figure on my radar. However my oldest daughter pushed me in seeing both Thor movies and I must say that I kind of enjoyed both of them and found them palatable. Thor in this comic, bought by me for the daughter in question, tickled my interest and I kind of took it upon my self to read it. Thor and Asgard have fallen after Ragnarok and are no longer in existence. And as anything in MARVEL lands we know how long that takes. So Thor reawakens and rebuilds Asgard somewhere in the middle of nowhere and sets out to find his fallen comrades in arms and to rebirth a whole lot of Asgardians. There is a brief intermezzo with Iron man who gets his behind whooped, which my daughter kinda liked as she belongs to team Captain America [Something to do with the civil war between the Marvel Superhero's]. Anyhow he scares the living daylights out of Iron man aka Tony Stark and tells him to leave him out of his petty conflict, which Stark then takes for a given. Thor is still seeking out his love Lady Sif when he encounters his enemies Loki and the Destroyer. When the comic ends I an not sure what happens of has happened but Asgard is now situated on earth and the gods seen to stay. I guess you have to be more than a fan of this character to know what is going on. I prefer the movies easily and leave reading further Solo Thor comic books to the die hard fans.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Wow. So that's why Asgard ended up floating above Oklahoma? Love it, love the context, love Donald Blake being an actual person, Thor a different, and the explanation for what's happened since Ragnarok. The art is solid, and I really enjoyed the storytelling. Best part? Thor kicking the ever loving shit out of Iron Man and daring him to come at him again. Then the reveals of Heimdall, the Warriors Three, and of course...Loki and the Destroyer. So,jazzed for this to continue.

  13. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    I did a review on this forever ago but for some reason I don't know why it went away. But 3 out of 5. Really entertaining though lots of build up can feel a bit slow. Art is fantastic though.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sadaf

    I was never the cool kid who read all the comic books, I have read a few as a kid, but my knowledge of all things super heroes is mostly based on my love of the super hero movies and internet trivia. I was obsessed with the DC movies of Michael Keaton days and of course Christian Bale was a nice homage, but then DC just started making shitty movies and no body ever talk to me about Ben Affleck ever ugh. But thank God for Marvel, I was obsessed with Xmen franchise and never thought I would care a I was never the cool kid who read all the comic books, I have read a few as a kid, but my knowledge of all things super heroes is mostly based on my love of the super hero movies and internet trivia. I was obsessed with the DC movies of Michael Keaton days and of course Christian Bale was a nice homage, but then DC just started making shitty movies and no body ever talk to me about Ben Affleck ever ugh. But thank God for Marvel, I was obsessed with Xmen franchise and never thought I would care about other MCU movies half as much but surprisingly I love them, I love Thor partially because of Chris Hemsworth I mean. I don't know much about Thor comic books and hadn't heard really good things so I wasn't a lot but this comic book was a pleasant surprise, the story line was easy to follow even though I have watched Ragnarok and as this comic was supposed to follow the events of Ragnarok, my mind kept trying to link the two.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    A deeply impressive reboot. Or rebirth, more appropriately. Thor, and all the Asgardians, were really, truly, legitimately dead in the Marvel U. How to bring them back? Huge props to JMS for how he does handle it. No take backs, no cheap tricks, and no easy routes. The rebirth of the Asgardians is a long, sometimes painful process. It rings true, and though I'm sure the (then still in pre-production) Thor movie helped convince Marvel to bring the god of thunder back, it reads as more than just a A deeply impressive reboot. Or rebirth, more appropriately. Thor, and all the Asgardians, were really, truly, legitimately dead in the Marvel U. How to bring them back? Huge props to JMS for how he does handle it. No take backs, no cheap tricks, and no easy routes. The rebirth of the Asgardians is a long, sometimes painful process. It rings true, and though I'm sure the (then still in pre-production) Thor movie helped convince Marvel to bring the god of thunder back, it reads as more than just an eventual movie tie-in. For one, there's the fabulous notion of Thor recreating Asgard as a city floating eight feet over Oklahoma. Aside from just being a brilliant notion, JMS follows through with some of the more practical concerns of a mythical city hanging over a small town. Like sanitation, for example. I have to say that the best scene was Thor bringing Iron Man to task for some of his actions during Civil War (seemingly still ongoing at the time). Namely, passing off a Thor clone as himself. Yeah, that'll put a ding in a friendship. The ensuing smackdown is epic, and immensely satisfying to read for someone who hated Civil War. Also, it seems Doom will somehow get tangled up in all of this, and I couldn't be happier.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    A second super solid Thor series (along with God of Thunder by Jason Aaron). Fun with very interesting possibilities on story direction.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    This is why I named my dog Thor.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Stewart

    I don't like the Thor turns into a mortal sometimes theme that many of the Thor series cling to. It doesn't make any sense from a narrative or mythological standpoint and just feels like some mortal power fantasy nonsense that I'm not looking for in my Thor stories.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    So Thor, huh... Thor is an interesting property. To be honest, I do not have that much experience reading Thor comics. I have read an issue here and there, and have seen him pop up in this crossover or another. And there are some Avengers books I've read with him in it. He is a character that has a rather difficult balance between the human world and Asgard (plus the other parts of the Yggdrasil). If Thor was a character that just existed as the Norse god of thunder in the midst of modern New York So Thor, huh... Thor is an interesting property. To be honest, I do not have that much experience reading Thor comics. I have read an issue here and there, and have seen him pop up in this crossover or another. And there are some Avengers books I've read with him in it. He is a character that has a rather difficult balance between the human world and Asgard (plus the other parts of the Yggdrasil). If Thor was a character that just existed as the Norse god of thunder in the midst of modern New York City he would be a ridiculous and stupid character. And this was mostly how he starts out from what I have seen. The things that always intrigued me was when I would get a glimpse of Asgard and the other Norse worlds and gods. When he's just putzing around earth and being a wannabe Superman it is pretty boring. When you bring in the rich cast of Asgard, etc., it is a much more enjoyable romp. Or at least it invites enjoyment. I hardly know if it is in fact enjoyable. So he is a character I have been intrigued by but reading these books would be my biggest jump into his lore. And in this series JMS is able to restart Thor's lore from scratch. Thor had been "dead" for a while as Ragnorak had occurred and all of the Norse worlds, except apparently Midgard, were destroyed. And Thor apparently stopped the cycle of rebirth that they made up for Ragnorak. So JMS gets a clean slate. And without giving much away, I enjoyed his new slate. He is able to effective balance Asgard and its relationship with earth by actually making it a stronger relationship rather than weakening it. This book also has the best use of Donald Blake I have seen. I almost want to see more of Donald Blake than Thor himself. I should note that Volume 1 is mostly setup. You don't get to the major events until Volume 2. But I was entertained through out. It is dissappointing to know that JMS leaves the book with a downtrend to the title due to the tampering he felt Marvel was doing to put out the Siege crossover. I have no idea if I will continue on with it much.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    My introduction to Norse mythology came in 1983 or 1984, when I read a copy of Thor Annual #11. Most of the tales of Asgard that made up that thick volume were fairly faithful retellings of the old legends. There was even a diagram of Yggdrasil and the nine worlds of the Scandinavian cosmology. I never kept up with Thor as a character in Marvel comics, but he has a place in my heart. This volume, which collects the first six issues of the new run of Thor that started last year under the direction My introduction to Norse mythology came in 1983 or 1984, when I read a copy of Thor Annual #11. Most of the tales of Asgard that made up that thick volume were fairly faithful retellings of the old legends. There was even a diagram of Yggdrasil and the nine worlds of the Scandinavian cosmology. I never kept up with Thor as a character in Marvel comics, but he has a place in my heart. This volume, which collects the first six issues of the new run of Thor that started last year under the direction of writer J. Michael Straczynski and artist Olivier Coipel, is light on action and heavy on mysticism, at least for the first several issues. Thor returns from the void in his human form of Dr. Donald Blake, contemplates the meaning of gods and men, recreates Asgard somewhere in Oklahoma, and sets out to find the rest of the Aesir, who are unwittingly trapped in human form. He finds Heimdall, the guardian of Asgard's bridge, in a New Orleans ravaged by Hurricane Katrina, finds the warriors three (Fandral, Volstagg, and Hogun) working with Médecins sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) in Africa as security personnel in a refugee camp, finds Balder trapped in the guise of The Destroyer, and accidentally frees a female version of Loki, whom it turns out is in cahoots with Doctor Doom (who appears in only one panel). The last issue in this collection takes place back in Oklahoma, where the new residents of Asgard are having a profound effect on their American neighbors. One man who was with his son when they met the enormous Hogun on the road says, "Since then, Steve's been holed up all day reading about Norse gods. Don't know what they'll make of that at Sunday School." These issues are almost all build-up, but the art is good and they're enjoyable to read. Straczynski writes Thor well, which is tricky, since his dialogue and inner thoughts are written in an antiquarian style that can easily become silly.

  21. 5 out of 5

    zxvasdf

    I was never a fan of norse gods within the Marvel Universe because it was just a little too strange, despite the writer/artist teams pulling it off time after time. It just bothered me that other pantheons weren't invited, you know? I think it'd be very interesting to have Kali devour the world at one point or another while Krishna dances his blue self across incarnations. So Thor died. As always, beloved superheroes have to return... so Thor does. It is the time after the Civil War, and Norman' I was never a fan of norse gods within the Marvel Universe because it was just a little too strange, despite the writer/artist teams pulling it off time after time. It just bothered me that other pantheons weren't invited, you know? I think it'd be very interesting to have Kali devour the world at one point or another while Krishna dances his blue self across incarnations. So Thor died. As always, beloved superheroes have to return... so Thor does. It is the time after the Civil War, and Norman's emissary finds out Thor isn't to be mucked with. He also finds out the god is much stronger than he let on. Thor rebuilds Asgard in the middle of an Oklahoma dustbowl. He haunts its corridors, lonely, searching for a meaning... The best part about this book is the tiny township in Oklahoma adjacent to the newly resurrected Asgard; it has to deal with the norse gods, especially in civil matters concerning sanitation. That was genuinely funny and thoughtful. This is an interesting take on the Norse mythos, and is intriguing enough to warrant further perusal.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    @#*&! Coipel can draw an incredible Thor! The art alone is worth it for this book. Always been a fan of his work but since I wasn't a fan of Thor, I skipped this series until now. He draws Thor with so much strength and presence it's really outstanding. This first volume deals with Thor and all of Asgard's return after Ragnarok (which I haven't read). I had no problems understanding the story, although I did already have the basic knowledge of Thor and his universe. This first book is a little so @#*&! Coipel can draw an incredible Thor! The art alone is worth it for this book. Always been a fan of his work but since I wasn't a fan of Thor, I skipped this series until now. He draws Thor with so much strength and presence it's really outstanding. This first volume deals with Thor and all of Asgard's return after Ragnarok (which I haven't read). I had no problems understanding the story, although I did already have the basic knowledge of Thor and his universe. This first book is a little solemn and almost reverential in it's pacing and storytelling. It sets up everything really well for establishing the new dynamic for the return of Asgard to the Marvel Universe. Highlight of the book for me was easily the confrontation between Thor and Iron Man. This occurs during Civil War when basically Tony was in charge of SHIELD. Seeing Thor's reaction to what Tony has done and how he treats Tony gave me immense pleasure. Looking forward to Vol 2.

  23. 5 out of 5

    kristen ♡

    It’s Thor, he’s great as always. Its always nice seeing Dr. Blake too! One thing I’ll say is that Straczynski did write this as a Thor fan and it definitely shines through! It’s always great when the writer is a fan of the character.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nelson

    Okay, first things first: this is my first Thor book. I haven't seen the movies yet, and I have barely seen him in any comics so far since I've been mostly keeping to the early 2000s for the time being and he's been absent. But wow!! I did not expect to like a Thor book this much, and I did not expect to like the character so much. I do have a predisposition to like Norse mythology, so I should've expected it, but it really surpassed my expectations. In case you're wondering, this is a great ser Okay, first things first: this is my first Thor book. I haven't seen the movies yet, and I have barely seen him in any comics so far since I've been mostly keeping to the early 2000s for the time being and he's been absent. But wow!! I did not expect to like a Thor book this much, and I did not expect to like the character so much. I do have a predisposition to like Norse mythology, so I should've expected it, but it really surpassed my expectations. In case you're wondering, this is a great series to start with the character. It isn't a reboot or anything, but it does start from scratch in every sense and it paints the character very clearly. J. Michael Straczynski is also new to me and I am definitely a fan now. There were some real gems of writing tucked in here. In terms of plot, we follow Thor being reborn, rebuilding Asgard, and finding the Asgardians whose souls have been lurking within mortals. This served as a great way to reintroduce the Thor mythos to a new reader, and I imagine a very nostalgic reunion for old Thor readers. Apart from that, I enjoyed the fact that we got some closure to the events of Civil War regarding Tony Stark's Thorbot. New Loki is great, the new characters are great. And most importantly, I think JMS really nailed the quiet moments - I think it's important to have those in a book like this. Olivier Coipel's art was also a huge treat. I generally love his work and this is no exception. He nails the majesty of Asgard, the explosiveness of Thor calling down thunder and lightning, the facial expressions, the iconic sound effects, and the character designs (seriously, how cool is female Loki?) Laura Martin is also a colorist I've grown to notice more and more. You might know her from Astonishing X-Men or Planetary. She does some great work on both the bombastic scenes and the quieter moments (those eggs on the last issue looked amazing!). This gets a strong 5/5 or 10/10. Perfect score! Great reintroduction, incredible writing, and breathtaking art. It really sold me on the character and the entire Asgardian part of the Marvel Universe. I was hooked from the first page and I can't wait to read the next volumes.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Callum Shephard

    If there was one comic which truly showed how to get a modern day monthly series right in the Marvel universe, it would be this one. While he is better known for an acclaimed but troubled run on Spider-Man, JMS truly struck gold here. There’s a perfect balance of humour and drama, an aversion to the growing nihilism of Marvel and best of all the plot never feels dragged out. It keeps a constant pace, progresses at a speed which allows for new revelations to take place along with minor character If there was one comic which truly showed how to get a modern day monthly series right in the Marvel universe, it would be this one. While he is better known for an acclaimed but troubled run on Spider-Man, JMS truly struck gold here. There’s a perfect balance of humour and drama, an aversion to the growing nihilism of Marvel and best of all the plot never feels dragged out. It keeps a constant pace, progresses at a speed which allows for new revelations to take place along with minor character moments, and lacks the ultra-decompression and padding many series suffer from. If anything it’s the anti-Age of Ultron comic more than anything else. Something only helped by the fact that, rather than focusing upon loss or the risk of losing something, the first volume is about rebuilding what was lost. Set in the wake of Civil War, the asgardian race lies seemingly dead following a gambit to escape Ragnarok. Asgard itself is long gone and Thor, the true Thor, has not been seen since entering hibernation. However, things are soon to change. Doctor Donald Blake once again walks the earth, restored thanks to a loophole in the spell Odin cast upon his son to make him believe he was human, and touches the fallen mjolnir. Communicating with the god of thunder’s spirit as it resides in the void of non-existance, he convinces him to take up the hammer once more with a new task: Restore his race and the fallen kingdom. However, the world is not as he remembers and Thor will find himself opposed by former allies and enemies alike as he tries to complete his task. The first thing to truly praise is the structure of the story and the overall style of the plot, especially when looking at it in terms of individual issues. Thor’s search for the asguardians and rebuilding Asgard might be an ongoing, overarching plotline but has enough beats to make it feel semi-episodic. With a large enough overall goal as bringing back an entire race, the comic can afford to focus upon one event at a time. Usually with Thor finding and bringing back a handful at once, displaying some degree of progress at every turn rather than achieving everything at the very end. It’s the difference between feeling like you’re following a series, and watching a film but having to fork out more cash for every new scene. It also works to make things feel bigger as there are more gradual events to keep track of, something which works in its favour even in trade paperback form. Beyond the structuring of the story is the actual content itself, and it’s clear right from the start JMS knows how to deliver on what an audience wants. Unlike a few who come to mind, he seemed to actually remember “oh yeah, Thor is a god” and made good use of that, treating him in the same sort of manner Grant Morrison does Superman. As a very powerful being who stands well above humanity, but rather than coming off as a Mary Sue displays his powers in genuinely entertaining ways which skirt the line of just showing off. It’s saying something when land disputes prove to be some of the most memorable moments of the comic. Any humour of Thor using his powers is only enhanced by the local townfolk of Broxton Oklahoma, Asgard’s new location. The ways they react to a group of larger than life viking gods living right next door are some of the funniest yet genuinely human moments i’ve seen in Marvel or DC of late, save possibly for the Power Girl series under Grey and Palmiotti. Biggest among them is a three page build-up to a joke with no dialogue and few actions, the punchline itself involving the image to the right. The scene is even funnier in context and with the final panel. The unfortunate thing is that the humour does result in a lot of the more serious moments being pushed into the background. Thor brooding upon the conciquences of his actions or task ahead of him, the severity of his actions and involvement in Africa (don’t ask, just read it) are welcome but not as present as they could have been. As much of an effort as there was to strike a balance between seriousness and humour, the comic definitely leans towards the latter. This also results in the eventual resolution of some of the trade’s problems feeling forced, confined to a much smaller number of pages than a more gradual resolution over a few issues. There are many elements which just come out of nowhere. Not enough to completely wreck the conclusion to the comic, but certainly enough to make a reader raise an eyebrow when several characters are reintroduced out of the blue. This is admittedly overshadowed when reading it the first time by one of the trade’s best battles, when Thor runs into an old foe of his. Speaking of the fights, there are only a handful of actual battles within the volume. Most only last a few panels and while this means they can be resolved by the issue’s end with pages left to further the plot, they tend to be relatively one sided. Usually in Thor’s favour with the god of thunder being barely slowed down by his foes, relying more upon the flashy effects, destruction and dialogue to keep readers entertained. That and seeing Das Eisenfuhrer being royally smacked about after his role in Civil War. Thankfully whatever their length, the art quality is continually exceptional during these sequences, as it is with the rest of the comic. Managing to contrast the elements of myth with contemporary earth brilliantly in style and colouring. Ultimately the book has definite shortcomings when it comes to certain aspects, but they’re passable. It’s hard to notice them when reading through the first time and there’s so much fun and positivity being given off it’s hard to really call them anything but necessary sacrifices for the plot. This is definitely a comic recommended to those jaded with Marvel as a result of recent decisions, showing good stories can be made even in the wake of the worst events. Between a suitably epic story-line fitting with the comic’s theme of deities and sagas, well delivered humour and brilliant writing this is definitely one worth picking up and even one worth starting Thor with. Continuity heavy as it might be, nearly everything you need to know is explained within the first few pages. If you have the time and cash, definitely check this one out.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    I only know Thor from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, so this was an interesting first dip. Straczynski focuses almost exclusively on the divine aspects of Thor as he is resurrected and works to bring Asgard back. Things go awry, of course, but Thor gets to really show his stuff here (the scene with Iron Man in his Civil-War Government spook mode is a highlight). There's tension between his divine and human sides, and his goals are in flux as he tries to determine just how much of his pantheon sh I only know Thor from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, so this was an interesting first dip. Straczynski focuses almost exclusively on the divine aspects of Thor as he is resurrected and works to bring Asgard back. Things go awry, of course, but Thor gets to really show his stuff here (the scene with Iron Man in his Civil-War Government spook mode is a highlight). There's tension between his divine and human sides, and his goals are in flux as he tries to determine just how much of his pantheon should be restored. The art is gorgeous, capturing plenty of storm and lightning scenes in beautiful detail. It doesn't provide much in resolution, but the ideas and plot are good on their own.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex Bledsoe

    This version of Thor is as grim and serious as he was under Jack Kirby, but only about half as ostentatious. Thor is now a big, taciturn warrior who brooks no nonsense, not even from Tony Stark. The art emphasizes the contrasts between the realistic humans and the more outlandish Asgardians, and while at first I didn't care for Coipel's version of Thor, by the end the perpetually sour scowl perfectly suited the character. Straczynski emphasizes the god aspect of the God of Thunder, showing him u This version of Thor is as grim and serious as he was under Jack Kirby, but only about half as ostentatious. Thor is now a big, taciturn warrior who brooks no nonsense, not even from Tony Stark. The art emphasizes the contrasts between the realistic humans and the more outlandish Asgardians, and while at first I didn't care for Coipel's version of Thor, by the end the perpetually sour scowl perfectly suited the character. Straczynski emphasizes the god aspect of the God of Thunder, showing him using his powers at full strength. A really good six-issue collection.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I found this volume a bit bland, but given I only really know Thor from the Marvel films, I may be a little biased. At least in terms of the plot, the stories don't seem to be really attached to each other, making any attempt at a linear narrative difficult to understand. Perhaps other Thor series are more entertaining-I don't want to give up on the Thor comics, but I'll try another Thor series instead.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Spent so long reading bad JMS stuff that I forgot he could be good. This is good. Thor is written well - as a slightly brutish leader nonetheless trying to lead Asgard on a new path - and dialogue across the board is tight, even if there is a sense that all of this talk is just leading to the same old. Copiel's art is really bold, and he actually keeps all the character's faces consistently on-model, which is surprisingly rare.

  30. 5 out of 5

    guanaeps

    The return of Thor to the MU, along with all of Asgard. A nice slow burn from JMS, with some astounding art from Olivier Coipel, Mark Morales and Laura Martin. Chris Eliopoulos tries something new with Odinson's inner monologue, using a unique, boxless calligraphy...and it kinda works, if feeling a little disjointed at times, switching between the unique calligraphy and the normal boxed captions. Overall, entertaining stuff.

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