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A lively, fascinating, eye-opening look at women and aging in America, by the beloved New York Times columnist. "You're not getting older, you're getting better," or so promised the famous 1970's ad--for women's hair dye. Americans have always had a complicated relationship with aging: embrace it, deny it, defer it--and women have been on the front lines of the battle, will A lively, fascinating, eye-opening look at women and aging in America, by the beloved New York Times columnist. "You're not getting older, you're getting better," or so promised the famous 1970's ad--for women's hair dye. Americans have always had a complicated relationship with aging: embrace it, deny it, defer it--and women have been on the front lines of the battle, willingly or not. In her lively social history of American women and aging, acclaimed New York Times columnist Gail Collins illustrates the ways in which age is an arbitrary concept that has swung back and forth over the centuries. From Plymouth Rock (when a woman was considered marriageable if "civil and under fifty years of age"), to a few generations later, when they were quietly retired to elderdom once they had passed the optimum age for reproduction, to recent decades when freedom from striving in the workplace and caretaking at home is often celebrated, to the first female nominee for president, American attitudes towards age have been a moving target. Gail Collins gives women reason to expect the best of their golden years.


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A lively, fascinating, eye-opening look at women and aging in America, by the beloved New York Times columnist. "You're not getting older, you're getting better," or so promised the famous 1970's ad--for women's hair dye. Americans have always had a complicated relationship with aging: embrace it, deny it, defer it--and women have been on the front lines of the battle, will A lively, fascinating, eye-opening look at women and aging in America, by the beloved New York Times columnist. "You're not getting older, you're getting better," or so promised the famous 1970's ad--for women's hair dye. Americans have always had a complicated relationship with aging: embrace it, deny it, defer it--and women have been on the front lines of the battle, willingly or not. In her lively social history of American women and aging, acclaimed New York Times columnist Gail Collins illustrates the ways in which age is an arbitrary concept that has swung back and forth over the centuries. From Plymouth Rock (when a woman was considered marriageable if "civil and under fifty years of age"), to a few generations later, when they were quietly retired to elderdom once they had passed the optimum age for reproduction, to recent decades when freedom from striving in the workplace and caretaking at home is often celebrated, to the first female nominee for president, American attitudes towards age have been a moving target. Gail Collins gives women reason to expect the best of their golden years.

30 review for No Stopping Us Now: A History of Older Women in America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Fazio

    Highly disappointed in this book in which I once heavily anticipated reading and enjoying. Not only was the writing somewhat of a cheap Wikipedia page, but the women selected to be represented in this book felt more of a political statement and standpoint than a well thought out, empowering book about older women representing generations throughout American history. After finishing this book, I shouldn't know more about the author and where she stands on the political spectrum than about the wom Highly disappointed in this book in which I once heavily anticipated reading and enjoying. Not only was the writing somewhat of a cheap Wikipedia page, but the women selected to be represented in this book felt more of a political statement and standpoint than a well thought out, empowering book about older women representing generations throughout American history. After finishing this book, I shouldn't know more about the author and where she stands on the political spectrum than about the women that were supposed to be represented and showcased. There were hundreds of great women, leaders and activists that could have been showcased in this book. Patti Smith, Madonna, Ella Fitzgerald, I'd even go as far of a reach as Taylor Swift, but Gail Collins omitted any musical influence in the book. Furthermore, I fail to see how Michelle Obama's fitness classes have more of a cultural impact than those of say... Mary Shelley and her classic "Frankenstein," Anne Frank, Betsy Ross, even Chanel. If you're going to throw Hillary Clinton in there as one of the most inspiring and influential women in America, toss in an article about Monica Lewinsky too, currently she's overseeing anti-bullying campaigns, that's influential, right? Objectiveness was NOT on Gail Collins' radar while creating this book. I was highly disappointed with this book as I anticipated a broad range of women, empowering and influencing America. Not the single-minded opinions of an older women whom so desperately desires to make a political statement. This was a Goodreads giveaway win, and I can honestly say, I'm happy it wasn't an ARC because now I can sell it to my used bookstore without having it rejected. Although, I wouldn't blame them if they still refused to take it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    I was a Goodreads First- Reads Winner and I loved this book for so many reasons. I recently turned 40 and I have become much more aware to the many ways in which my life has simultaneously become so much better and I've started to become ignored by general society. Olga Tokarczuk talked about us becoming invisible after 40, and I have been starting to believe her. This book helps to put a bit of context onto that point of view, with information related to women who (sometimes after the grand age I was a Goodreads First- Reads Winner and I loved this book for so many reasons. I recently turned 40 and I have become much more aware to the many ways in which my life has simultaneously become so much better and I've started to become ignored by general society. Olga Tokarczuk talked about us becoming invisible after 40, and I have been starting to believe her. This book helps to put a bit of context onto that point of view, with information related to women who (sometimes after the grand age of 30) went forth and became leaders at home and nationally. This is an American-centric view of older women, so there are our early national feminine heroines to pull from; Abigail Adams, Sojourner Truth, Martha Washington, etc. though those in the cinema become more pronounced in later years (though perhaps that is a reflection of our cinema obsessed culture than a lake of contemporary heroines). I really appreciated the parts about how the economy at times created certain aspects of women's desirability (thinness/stockiness) instead of claims for "healthiness". I loved reading about how policy was changed by older women and ultimately how the realities of women have changed as a result of divorce, male frailty, and the family unit as a whole. I'm going to get all my friends to read this as I enjoyed it so much.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kristy Miller

    I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. There have never been a ton of people looking to document the history and experience of women in America. Gail Collins has made writing about American women her niche, and this is her third full length book on the subject. I have read and enjoyed all of them. No Stopping Us Now spans the length of American history, from the colonies to the 21st Century, but it focuses on "older" women and how they contribute I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. There have never been a ton of people looking to document the history and experience of women in America. Gail Collins has made writing about American women her niche, and this is her third full length book on the subject. I have read and enjoyed all of them. No Stopping Us Now spans the length of American history, from the colonies to the 21st Century, but it focuses on "older" women and how they contributed to and experienced America. What qualifies as older changes slightly over time as women live longer and as society begins to acknowledge that women exist after child bearing years, but she generally discussed women 40-50 years of age and older. Older women in America are contributing more now than ever, but as Ms. Collins informs us they have always been there. We just need to listen to them. The book is roughly broken down by decade after the turn of the 20th century. In each time period Ms. Collins has at least one section regarding the experience of African American women in that time period. There is a fair amount of subject cross-over with her book When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present, though I noticed more of a focus one women's health in this one. How medicine viewed and treated older women had a definite impact on how they interacted with society. All in all this is an excellent entry in to our meager catalog of women's history in America. The upside is that it look like the impact of women is only growing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    I received my copy free through Goodreads Giveaways.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Corin

    Engaging and inspiring. Recommended.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jan Priddy

    Anecdotal passages are a delightful review of women's lives from the nineteenth century to today through the experiences and words of specific historical women. Collins possesses a lively voice on the page and the book was a pleasant read, divided into chapters by decade, and each chapter divided by subheadings titled with direct quotes from someone of the period. She makes occasional course corrections—reminding readers that some of the options available to affluent elderly people are not withi Anecdotal passages are a delightful review of women's lives from the nineteenth century to today through the experiences and words of specific historical women. Collins possesses a lively voice on the page and the book was a pleasant read, divided into chapters by decade, and each chapter divided by subheadings titled with direct quotes from someone of the period. She makes occasional course corrections—reminding readers that some of the options available to affluent elderly people are not within the reach of "some" (most) Americans. A hundred years ago, when the elderly were no longer able to work, women were more likely to be welcomed into the homes of their adult children as child-minders and light-work domestics. Men were not so welcome. This is one reason retirement was harder for men than women. A couple of paragraphs remarked on how suicide rates among the elderly dropped abruptly as Social Security and Medicare systems came online. (I might have wished for more about this.) The thesis for the book is that women are people capable of doing great things with their lives right up until shortly before they die. Collins provides abundant evidence through quotations, advertising, and the lives of real women. Many nineteenth and early twentieth century women continued to work for social and political justice—often into their 70s or even 80s—and were inspiring almost to the point of being depressing. I feel guilty for retiring at 66. Despite the fussing about what is or is not "old" or "elderly" with statistics and experts and pop culture each given their contradictory opinions toward the end of this book, I will say I am "old." Pages of review of claims that 40 is the new 30 or 70 is the new 50, the shift from anecdote-centered reporting to statistics toward the end mearly cost this book a star here. Rachel Carson was missing, and she is clearly a poster child for several of the issues Collins covers so effectively in this book: women who sacrifice their lives for the sake of family members (parents and later a nephew); women who are dismissed for gender, age, etc.; and women who take up a new cause/occupation after menopause. Carson had been a marine biologist working for the government and a creative nonfiction writer when she found a cause no one else was willing to undertake—exposing the egregious abuses of the chemical industry. Chemists told her they did not dare speak out because the corporations would ruin them. They ruined Carson instead. Collins does a great job of unearthing ghastly pop wisdom. Here's one she might have missed: "The man chases her until she catches him" was a popular saying in my youth based on the assumption that only women benefitted from marriage. I would have hoped for some mention that in the last century men who were married lived longer and subjectively happier lives than their bachelor peers. The reverse was true for women. However we define age, aging, and the aged, people should not allow others to limit their choices of action and advancement. There is a limit to what one book can cover, even or perhaps especially one so meticulously documented as this one. This was a better overview of the decades around the turn of the last century than I have found in any textbook. I received this book as a Giveaway, but would have bought it, and been grateful to have read it without that perk. I thank the publishers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    There's a lot of good stuff in this book, and it would be great for young people (both women and men) to read, but I'm afraid the misleading title will scare them away. Gail Collins' latest book is really a cultural history of adult women in America with the "older" theme forced onto it. "Older" in the book can mean anything from older than 25 to 65+ and many of the women mentioned in the book (maybe even most) were younger than 60 at the time of their exploits/comments. The actual title (not the There's a lot of good stuff in this book, and it would be great for young people (both women and men) to read, but I'm afraid the misleading title will scare them away. Gail Collins' latest book is really a cultural history of adult women in America with the "older" theme forced onto it. "Older" in the book can mean anything from older than 25 to 65+ and many of the women mentioned in the book (maybe even most) were younger than 60 at the time of their exploits/comments. The actual title (not the one on Goodreads) is No Stopping Us Now: The Adventures of Older Women in American History, which I guess means somebody changed it because "adventures" sounded more exciting than "history." The book is not so much about daring deeds as it is about changes in the way our culture has perceived and treated women. There is a lot of focus on women in movies and television, on beauty standards (especially hair dye and plastic surgery) and fashion. Gail Collins takes us from corsets to bloomers to pantsuits. Did you know: When the Mary Tyler Moore Show came out, Mary was considered a "spinster" at 30. A woman member first wore pants on the floor of the House of Representatives in 1969, but it wasn't until 1993 that it happened in the Senate. And a favorite: "When the '60s began, only about 7 percent of American women dyed their hair. Within a decade. the practice was so common the government stopped putting hair color on passports." None of the women get really in-depth treatment in an overview like this, but there is enough to let us know why we should remember Eleanor Roosevelt and Margaret Chase Smith and be grateful for Ruth Bader Ginsberg. Of course most of us who actually are older women remember a lot of the things mentioned in this book and don't necessarily need to be reminded.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bruin Mccon

    First, I should say I am not the target audience for this book. If I’m still alive to reach 60, I will then be, as someone quoted in this non-fiction history of older women, in my “old age infancy” and can really be inspired. This book has a lot of what you’d expect: + A summary of things badass older women accomplished + An admission that the American suffragettes were racist as hell + An acknowledgement that women of color suffer much more in old age than white women + Rage-inducing stories about w First, I should say I am not the target audience for this book. If I’m still alive to reach 60, I will then be, as someone quoted in this non-fiction history of older women, in my “old age infancy” and can really be inspired. This book has a lot of what you’d expect: + A summary of things badass older women accomplished + An admission that the American suffragettes were racist as hell + An acknowledgement that women of color suffer much more in old age than white women + Rage-inducing stories about women’s employment woes of yesteryear + Sex It also has a bit of what you don’t expect: + A history of the use of hair dye in America + Depression-era stories + Discussion of the term “cougar” I did like this book and plan to recommend it to several women. But it didn’t make me as angry as I expected, overall. It was intended to be inspiration and that it was.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    This may be more information than I want or need to know on the subject. Still undecided how I feel about the current moment for older women. Hard enough to decide how I feel on a given day about being an older woman.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rkrynak

    This book had a really great message. It included much information with examples and documentation. It is a nonfiction read. However, it could have been much more enjoyable to read with a more engaging style.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    A fun fast paced overview of lives of women in English colonies, and United States. I’m not sure if the history will stick but it’s a fun read. I’ve always been a fan if Gail Collins. I enjoyed reading it a lot. It’s chocked full of facts and stories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nichola Gutgold

    Another great Gail Collins read. When Everything Changed is my favorite, but this one is a close second, especially since we have a 70 year old female presidential front runner. I forgot that Margaret Chase Smith lost her senate seat due to ageism and there are many anecdotal facts about women's lives I simply never read before. Another gem!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Gail Collins is my favorite NYT op-ed columnist, bar none. Her columns are always smart, funny, and incisive. The same is true of her new book, a historical overview of the place of older women in American society. It's extremely well researched and I learned a lot, and Collins's wry sense of humor shines through. At times it seems as though she wanted to make sure she inserted every interesting historical tidbit she found in her research, but by the end I appreciated the breadth of the tale tol Gail Collins is my favorite NYT op-ed columnist, bar none. Her columns are always smart, funny, and incisive. The same is true of her new book, a historical overview of the place of older women in American society. It's extremely well researched and I learned a lot, and Collins's wry sense of humor shines through. At times it seems as though she wanted to make sure she inserted every interesting historical tidbit she found in her research, but by the end I appreciated the breadth of the tale told.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Judi

    I really enjoyed reading this. Great information written in a most entertaining, readable way, and presented some facts I didn't know and others which, although I knew them, were presented in a fresh way.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    This is an much needed history that explores the role of women over time in the United States. It is well writtten and engaging.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bianca

    I liked this book. I'm 41 so I dont really feel "older" just yet however I relate in the sense that I think in our society 20-30 year olds are often portrayed in movies & media as beauty standards. I felt this book was encouraging and inspiring. I liked that the author uses various famous women as examples of accomplished and yes, beautiful, women in society. There is definitely a lot to ponder and contemplate about gender, ageism etc. Well done. I received this as a Goodreads Giveaway in exchang I liked this book. I'm 41 so I dont really feel "older" just yet however I relate in the sense that I think in our society 20-30 year olds are often portrayed in movies & media as beauty standards. I felt this book was encouraging and inspiring. I liked that the author uses various famous women as examples of accomplished and yes, beautiful, women in society. There is definitely a lot to ponder and contemplate about gender, ageism etc. Well done. I received this as a Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    At 33, I do not believe I am the correct demographic for this book, but I do look forward to being an older woman in the future. In general, this is a collection of stories of "older" women. "Older" depends on the era- at some points in the book, it means women in their 30s and other times, it's 80s/90s. It ended up being a history of women in general in America, leaving out teens and 20-somethings. It leans liberal, but includes conservative women politicians. Collins tries to include non-white At 33, I do not believe I am the correct demographic for this book, but I do look forward to being an older woman in the future. In general, this is a collection of stories of "older" women. "Older" depends on the era- at some points in the book, it means women in their 30s and other times, it's 80s/90s. It ended up being a history of women in general in America, leaving out teens and 20-somethings. It leans liberal, but includes conservative women politicians. Collins tries to include non-white women and does better earlier in the book with that. It doesn't go particularly deep- it would be a good stepping stone of a book if you wanted to go and read more about a particular woman.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shelbe

    Terrific. Goddamn I am learning SO MUCH. My reading of late has been so female focused, and it's making me realize how much I don't know. But this is exciting because I have so much more to learn!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristi Richardson

    Great book about the struggle for older women to survive in our culture. Ms. Collins hits the beginning of our colonies with older women being pegged as witches to the latest in our political stories of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Nancy Pelosi. I was especially intrigued by the plight of women who once they were done with their child bearing years were allowed to either join women's clubs to get involved in politics or like Susan B. Anthony to go full out radical and ask for the right of women to vot Great book about the struggle for older women to survive in our culture. Ms. Collins hits the beginning of our colonies with older women being pegged as witches to the latest in our political stories of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Nancy Pelosi. I was especially intrigued by the plight of women who once they were done with their child bearing years were allowed to either join women's clubs to get involved in politics or like Susan B. Anthony to go full out radical and ask for the right of women to vote. I also liked hearing about the start of Social Security and how small it was and the fact that women were not recieving anything at first if they didn't work outside the home. Their were also exemptions for maids and other servants to not get anything. As an older woman I see that priorities haven't changed much. Women of a certain age still find it freeing to not have to worry about child care and get more involved in pushing a political agenda. We've come a long way baby, but we aren't there yet! I checked this book from my local library.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debra Hines

    I have loved all of Susan Collins' books on Women's History. I've read America's Women and When Everything Changed and bought them for my daughter and together, those books form a comprehensive history of women in the United States. The Women's History Library in the back of America's Women is my Bible- I've purchased and read about 75% of all the books on the various lists. I was delighted to find Collin's new book, especially because the demographic is mine- how "older women" have played a rol I have loved all of Susan Collins' books on Women's History. I've read America's Women and When Everything Changed and bought them for my daughter and together, those books form a comprehensive history of women in the United States. The Women's History Library in the back of America's Women is my Bible- I've purchased and read about 75% of all the books on the various lists. I was delighted to find Collin's new book, especially because the demographic is mine- how "older women" have played a role in Women's history. Ironically, until very recently, "older" was often defined as over 30 or 40. I feel extremely lucky to live in a time when women are vibrant and working at many ages, although the pressure to "look young" is still a message sent by our culture. Not much new ground in this book- the women she profiled are well known for someone who loves women's history, but I enjoyed reading about them, and how older women in general, were viewed at every age of America's past, and present.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aarti

    I loved Gail Collins' other books on women's roles throughout history, though it has been some years since I read them. I enjoyed this one for the most part, except that it was so, so focused on white women's experiences, particularly rich, white women's experiences. It was not universal at all. Also, even though it has been quite a while since I read America's Women and When Everything Changed, it felt to me like there was quite a bit of overlap. I get it, Margaret Chase Smith was amazing, but I loved Gail Collins' other books on women's roles throughout history, though it has been some years since I read them. I enjoyed this one for the most part, except that it was so, so focused on white women's experiences, particularly rich, white women's experiences. It was not universal at all. Also, even though it has been quite a while since I read America's Women and When Everything Changed, it felt to me like there was quite a bit of overlap. I get it, Margaret Chase Smith was amazing, but what about Shirley Chisolm? Or Dolores Huerta? Ida B. Wells? What about some LGBTQ rights activists? Or just working class or middle class women, who may not be famous? These women also did a lot of work (and got old), but they barely get a mention. I understand that this is a wide-ranging book that is more popular history than something very in-depth, but I very much felt the lack, and it did not feel like as full and robust a history as it could have been because is those misses.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Judith

    No Stopping Us Now: The Adventures of Older Women in American History is an American reading adventure. Collins’s wit and her research take us from the struggles of pioneer women, few of whom survived farm life into old age at 35, to the struggles of our American contemporaries, whose life expectancy has recently begun to decline, especially in rural areas. The way Collins tells it, the adventures of many mature women, from Annie Oakely at 37, to Betty White, now 98, are as engaging as those who No Stopping Us Now: The Adventures of Older Women in American History is an American reading adventure. Collins’s wit and her research take us from the struggles of pioneer women, few of whom survived farm life into old age at 35, to the struggles of our American contemporaries, whose life expectancy has recently begun to decline, especially in rural areas. The way Collins tells it, the adventures of many mature women, from Annie Oakely at 37, to Betty White, now 98, are as engaging as those who made history for us all, the suffragists, the second wave, the female politicians who persist despite the sexist commentary that follows every woman in the public eye. Collins does not stop short of the Trump era, but arms the reader with plenty of heroines with whom to face the future.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    It is easy to get caught up in the stories and not realize how much information Collins is providing the reader. Facts as story one of the few non-fiction books that I read all the way through. The actual age when women are considered old and how society treats older women is long and varied; sadly so little has changed in so many ways-there are outliers out there but I see Americans as still seeing women in the domestic role, admiring the thin and beautiful. There have been so many important th It is easy to get caught up in the stories and not realize how much information Collins is providing the reader. Facts as story one of the few non-fiction books that I read all the way through. The actual age when women are considered old and how society treats older women is long and varied; sadly so little has changed in so many ways-there are outliers out there but I see Americans as still seeing women in the domestic role, admiring the thin and beautiful. There have been so many important things done by women, yet we are constantly fed "his"story rather than "her"story. I cannot help thinking how I would rather have Hillary as president in the current crisis!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cath

    A mostly entertaining, largely anecdotal look at the history of women and aging in American society, with little to no analysis of underlying cultural and psychological forces at play. Though there is some analysis the very early chapters, when perhaps fewer historical anecdotes were available. While the author, in the last two chapters, addresses the time period of 2000-current, it probably would have been better had the book ended at the end of the 20th century, if not perhaps even a little so A mostly entertaining, largely anecdotal look at the history of women and aging in American society, with little to no analysis of underlying cultural and psychological forces at play. Though there is some analysis the very early chapters, when perhaps fewer historical anecdotes were available. While the author, in the last two chapters, addresses the time period of 2000-current, it probably would have been better had the book ended at the end of the 20th century, if not perhaps even a little sooner, as the last chapters seem less about history and more about a frantic recounting of various pop culture trends.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tharen

    Gail Collins has a way of pulling out the most obscure, interesting facts and making them fun. In this book, she delves into society's opinions and reactions to older women starting in the the colonial era and moving up to today. The suffragettes, abolitionists and feminists of the 60s and 70s all are covered, with comments from their supporters and detractors. The medical opinions about post-menopausal women, the improvements in medicine that allowed older women to be more productive and the ma Gail Collins has a way of pulling out the most obscure, interesting facts and making them fun. In this book, she delves into society's opinions and reactions to older women starting in the the colonial era and moving up to today. The suffragettes, abolitionists and feminists of the 60s and 70s all are covered, with comments from their supporters and detractors. The medical opinions about post-menopausal women, the improvements in medicine that allowed older women to be more productive and the many opinions about makeup, cosmetic surgery and hair coloring are all featured. Informative and enjoyable.,

  26. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    This was a really enjoyable read! It covers the role and life of the 'older' American woman from pre-colonial days to the current time frame. The topics covered are varied and interesting ... politics, fashions, medical issues, historical characters, cosmetics and much, much more. The book is an easy, entertaining read that is well-researched and written in an informal style. Bottom line is that life offers so much for the aging woman and she is ready and eager to embrace it. I won a copy of this This was a really enjoyable read! It covers the role and life of the 'older' American woman from pre-colonial days to the current time frame. The topics covered are varied and interesting ... politics, fashions, medical issues, historical characters, cosmetics and much, much more. The book is an easy, entertaining read that is well-researched and written in an informal style. Bottom line is that life offers so much for the aging woman and she is ready and eager to embrace it. I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway for this honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diane Parfitt

    Enjoyed this excellent historical look at older women thru history. Gail Collins is a great writer and makes this a most enjoyable read. It reminds us of how far women have come and how far we still have to go to retain the advances we have fought so hard for. We also realize that older women have so much to offer and we are often thwarted in our attempts to contribute to society. It's done in a suble but demeaning way and we need to be alert to it and not tolerate this. Collins presents this wi Enjoyed this excellent historical look at older women thru history. Gail Collins is a great writer and makes this a most enjoyable read. It reminds us of how far women have come and how far we still have to go to retain the advances we have fought so hard for. We also realize that older women have so much to offer and we are often thwarted in our attempts to contribute to society. It's done in a suble but demeaning way and we need to be alert to it and not tolerate this. Collins presents this with sound research but also with humor. I found it most enjoyable and an easy book to read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marcia G. Yerman

    Reviewed this for NextTribe: https://nexttribe.com/gail-collins-ne... "Combining deeply researched findings (even about menopause during the Civil War) with the acerbic wit that Collins utilizes in her columns, it’s a lively ride. The reader meets plenty of characters with guts and determination, most who have previously been relegated to the dustbin of history." I was glad that Collins dug into some of the racist attitudes of well know women's leaders of the first wave. Picked up some interesting Reviewed this for NextTribe: https://nexttribe.com/gail-collins-ne... "Combining deeply researched findings (even about menopause during the Civil War) with the acerbic wit that Collins utilizes in her columns, it’s a lively ride. The reader meets plenty of characters with guts and determination, most who have previously been relegated to the dustbin of history." I was glad that Collins dug into some of the racist attitudes of well know women's leaders of the first wave. Picked up some interesting facts, including That Margaret Chase Smith took on Joe McCarthy!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Tornello

    This book offers an interesting look at how America's views on aging women have changed over time. It offered both general overviews and specific examples of individual women. The book focuses on different areas, such as politics, careers, popular entertainment, and beauty standards. It also gives me hope that older women will continue to be more accepted in society as time goes on. I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. Yay!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Fascinating history of older women in the good ol' USA, from pioneer days when women were old at 40-something (no longer having babies) to the flapper days (when 19 was getting over-the-hill) and on to current times (optimistically, with more opportunities). Enjoyed the stories about the exceptional women who created change. I'm hopeful for future generations, women of color, and the growth of the middle class, but not as optimistic given the levels of poverty in America.

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