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L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Vol 35: Bestselling Anthology of Award-Winning Science Fiction and Fantasy Short Stories

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Let your imagination run wild.If you’re ready to travel to a universe of mystery, sacrifice, and suspense, where the laws of physics are optional, book your journey here. On this odyssey of enchantment, enlightenment, and endless possibility, you will meet a murderer who’s out to save mankind, a cyborg who robs the dead to rescue the living, and a lost boy who holds the ke Let your imagination run wild.If you’re ready to travel to a universe of mystery, sacrifice, and suspense, where the laws of physics are optional, book your journey here. On this odyssey of enchantment, enlightenment, and endless possibility, you will meet a murderer who’s out to save mankind, a cyborg who robs the dead to rescue the living, and a lost boy who holds the key to peace. Discover visions of the world, of mankind, and of the future that are sure to open your eyes. Every illustration will touch you. Every word will move you. Every idea will take you by surprise. Just imagine. Bonus: Learn how to write or improve your craft with tips from award-winning and bestselling author and editor Mike Resnick and New York Times bestselling author L. Ron Hubbard. Internationally renowned artist, Rob Prior, shares tips of the trade for aspiring illustrators. “It’s one of the forces that keep science fiction alive.” —Orson Scott Card The 35th collection of winners of the Writers and Illustrators of the Future competition features expertly crafted stories and art, spanning the gamut from hard core sci-fi to epic fantasy. 12 stories so fresh and new, they're 5–10 years ahead of the curve—the future is literally here and now. Each year, the Writers and Illustrators of the Future Contests’ blue-ribbon judges search the world to discover and introduce to you the very best new talent in sci-fi and fantasy. Created by L. Ron Hubbard, whose commitment to help new writers and artists gave rise to the annual Writers of the Future anthologies—a launching pad for writers and artists who are sure to command our attention for decades to come. The 24 award-winning sci-fi and fantasy authors and illustrators are accompanied by New York Times bestselling authors L. Ron Hubbard, Rebecca Moesta, Mike Resnick, Dean Wesley Smith, and world-class artists Rob Prior and Echo Chernik and edited by David Farland


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Let your imagination run wild.If you’re ready to travel to a universe of mystery, sacrifice, and suspense, where the laws of physics are optional, book your journey here. On this odyssey of enchantment, enlightenment, and endless possibility, you will meet a murderer who’s out to save mankind, a cyborg who robs the dead to rescue the living, and a lost boy who holds the ke Let your imagination run wild.If you’re ready to travel to a universe of mystery, sacrifice, and suspense, where the laws of physics are optional, book your journey here. On this odyssey of enchantment, enlightenment, and endless possibility, you will meet a murderer who’s out to save mankind, a cyborg who robs the dead to rescue the living, and a lost boy who holds the key to peace. Discover visions of the world, of mankind, and of the future that are sure to open your eyes. Every illustration will touch you. Every word will move you. Every idea will take you by surprise. Just imagine. Bonus: Learn how to write or improve your craft with tips from award-winning and bestselling author and editor Mike Resnick and New York Times bestselling author L. Ron Hubbard. Internationally renowned artist, Rob Prior, shares tips of the trade for aspiring illustrators. “It’s one of the forces that keep science fiction alive.” —Orson Scott Card The 35th collection of winners of the Writers and Illustrators of the Future competition features expertly crafted stories and art, spanning the gamut from hard core sci-fi to epic fantasy. 12 stories so fresh and new, they're 5–10 years ahead of the curve—the future is literally here and now. Each year, the Writers and Illustrators of the Future Contests’ blue-ribbon judges search the world to discover and introduce to you the very best new talent in sci-fi and fantasy. Created by L. Ron Hubbard, whose commitment to help new writers and artists gave rise to the annual Writers of the Future anthologies—a launching pad for writers and artists who are sure to command our attention for decades to come. The 24 award-winning sci-fi and fantasy authors and illustrators are accompanied by New York Times bestselling authors L. Ron Hubbard, Rebecca Moesta, Mike Resnick, Dean Wesley Smith, and world-class artists Rob Prior and Echo Chernik and edited by David Farland

30 review for L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Vol 35: Bestselling Anthology of Award-Winning Science Fiction and Fantasy Short Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

    I need to stop picking up anything with that man's name on it. I don't know why I bother. Anyway ... where to begin ... I'll begin with the two good bits—the two stories that are the only reason I'm keeping this anthology—Untrained Luck by Elise Stephens and Thanatos Drive by Andrew Dykstal. Elise's story impressed me with her ability to create such fully fleshed-out universe in a short story. She offered impressive depth for so little prose. I'd love to see more of the world she created. Andrew's I need to stop picking up anything with that man's name on it. I don't know why I bother. Anyway ... where to begin ... I'll begin with the two good bits—the two stories that are the only reason I'm keeping this anthology—Untrained Luck by Elise Stephens and Thanatos Drive by Andrew Dykstal. Elise's story impressed me with her ability to create such fully fleshed-out universe in a short story. She offered impressive depth for so little prose. I'd love to see more of the world she created. Andrew's post-apocalyptic short, likewise, created a tremendous and thought-provoking vision with few words. The rest was mediocre at best. This anthology is full of stories that are readable but fall completely out of the mind almost as soon as finished. The exception being the ones that are simply just bad. I certainly could have lived without L. Ron's The Idealist. "Little known" classics are often "little known" for good reason. This particular gem was a prime example of stories that gave scifi a bad name during the Golden Era. I DNFed it. I also DNFed Dark Equations of the Heart by David Cleden and damn near every essay in the book. I don't generally DNF short fiction, but this stuff was miserable to read. The Damned Voyage by John Haas deserves a special note. It deserves it because the author actually has some good writing skills. However, he doesn't apparently realize that when paying homage to Lovecraft's Cthulhu-verse, it truly isn't necessary to include his racism. There was a completely-irrelevant-to-the-story white-savior subplot, including brown people that are either infantilized or villains. All-in-all, this one was a waste of time that took me a lot longer to read than it should have because the two excellent stories were spaced just far enough apart to keep me hoping there would be another. I received a complimentary copy of this book via a Goodreads giveaway. Many thanks to all involved in providing me with this opportunity.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

    An anthology of science fiction stories by new writers chosen in an annual competition, accompanied by original art work by young artists. Most of the stories are moderately interesting, about up to the standards of "Analog," an sf magazine which isn't really sparklingly original. It has a couple of stories and articles by established authors, and those are particularly bad, as if they were given stuff that other publications rejected. L. Ron Hubbard, by the way, has been dead for years. He doe An anthology of science fiction stories by new writers chosen in an annual competition, accompanied by original art work by young artists. Most of the stories are moderately interesting, about up to the standards of "Analog," an sf magazine which isn't really sparklingly original. It has a couple of stories and articles by established authors, and those are particularly bad, as if they were given stuff that other publications rejected. L. Ron Hubbard, by the way, has been dead for years. He doesn't present anything anymore. I received this book free from Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Galaxy Press

    I have read all the Writers of the Future volumes and each year they get better. There is both SF and Fantasy. I enjoyed that the stories from the two UK winners kept the UK English spelling. And then there is the illustration, the art work once again does a great job of enhancing each story with the color plates of the stories up front as well as the B&W printed in the story as it had been since the beginning. Cover art by Bob Eggleton is one of my favorite covers and Dean Wesley Smith wrote a s I have read all the Writers of the Future volumes and each year they get better. There is both SF and Fantasy. I enjoyed that the stories from the two UK winners kept the UK English spelling. And then there is the illustration, the art work once again does a great job of enhancing each story with the color plates of the stories up front as well as the B&W printed in the story as it had been since the beginning. Cover art by Bob Eggleton is one of my favorite covers and Dean Wesley Smith wrote a story for the book based on the cover art entitled "Lost Robot" using his superhero detective Sky Tate. Rebecca Moesta has a very fun YA story, "Yellow Submarine," a genre she is a genius at writing. L. Ron Hubbard has a future history story in the year 2893 that he wrote at the time now known as the Golden Age of SF called "The Idealist." The article by Mike Resnick on how to sell your short fiction is simply brilliant and a rarely discussed topic.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Deming

    This is a wonderful anthology! Every year I like it better even thought I hate to sound so cliche. There is an article by L Ron Hubbard titled "Tomorrow's Miracles," which is a very simply written piece on how philosophy precedes science that is quite insightful and I find I understand what seemed more like complex goblety gook in school, as in his mentioning Spencer's Unification Theory and what that is exactly. If my past school philosophy classes were so succint and lucid the course would have This is a wonderful anthology! Every year I like it better even thought I hate to sound so cliche. There is an article by L Ron Hubbard titled "Tomorrow's Miracles," which is a very simply written piece on how philosophy precedes science that is quite insightful and I find I understand what seemed more like complex goblety gook in school, as in his mentioning Spencer's Unification Theory and what that is exactly. If my past school philosophy classes were so succint and lucid the course would have been much more enjoyable. But the poiint being made it the idea or hypothosis come before the fact of the actual thing or scientific fact, which seems quite true and is well stated with historical examples of contirbuters to thought, several of which I hadn't seen or gotten to in texts of my own reading or schooling. Ok now.. the stories are varied from dark,gritty and suspenseful to fun. Thantos Drive was gripping. Super Duper Moongirl and The Amazing Moon Dawdler was very enjoyable more on the fun side. Dark Equations of the Heart was gritty sad and suspenseful and had me wondering what the hell the author was talking about and how creative it was to tie in a passion for Arithmatic into a sort of mystical suspense tale. Extremely clever. I could go on and on but I don't want to ruin any fun you might have figuring out or enjoying what is going on in the stories. One left me a tad flat which makes me want to reread it to see if I missed something or my mood was too contrary when I read it or whatever, but thus far I found all others felt well worthwhile. I hope you try this volume and perhaps see the awards event online at writersofthefuture.com. Happy reading!

  5. 4 out of 5

    James Mourgos

    I liked this verion of Writers of the Future Vol 35. I’ve been collecting or reading these since they first came out back in 1986 or so. Another great read. Cool tips and sci fi stories as well as a lot of info for the new writer or new artist in this writing contest that is celebrating its 35th year of publication. Dean Wesley Smith and L. Ron Hubbard both write some cool stories. I think my favorite was from Smith, his robot in a lake tale. And Hubbard’s tale of a revolution gone bad and every I liked this verion of Writers of the Future Vol 35. I’ve been collecting or reading these since they first came out back in 1986 or so. Another great read. Cool tips and sci fi stories as well as a lot of info for the new writer or new artist in this writing contest that is celebrating its 35th year of publication. Dean Wesley Smith and L. Ron Hubbard both write some cool stories. I think my favorite was from Smith, his robot in a lake tale. And Hubbard’s tale of a revolution gone bad and everyone sent to an empty planet around the star Sirius. Some stories of corpses, or a rogue Doctor roaming the countryside, lots of things like this. Some good, some bad. Judge for yourself. Recommended!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tom Johnson

    Volume 35 continues the annual winners in the SF short story contests presented by the Galaxy Press L. Ron Hubbard folks, and this year is just as fascinating as previous years. Featuring this year’s 12 best international tales, as well as illustrated by the best international illustrators. Includes three short stories by professional authors L. Ron Hubbard, Dean Wesley Smith, and Rebecca Moesta. With essays on writing and illustrating by L. Ron Hubbard, Mike Resnick, and Rob Prior. The winning s Volume 35 continues the annual winners in the SF short story contests presented by the Galaxy Press L. Ron Hubbard folks, and this year is just as fascinating as previous years. Featuring this year’s 12 best international tales, as well as illustrated by the best international illustrators. Includes three short stories by professional authors L. Ron Hubbard, Dean Wesley Smith, and Rebecca Moesta. With essays on writing and illustrating by L. Ron Hubbard, Mike Resnick, and Rob Prior. The winning stories this year are Untrained Luck by Elise Stephens, and illustrated by Aliya Chen; The First Warden by Kai Wolden, and illustrated by Alexander Gustafson; The Damned Voyage by John Haas, and illustrated by Allen Morris; Thanatos Drive by Andrew Dykstal, and illustrated by Qianjiao Ma; A Harvest of Astronauts by Kyle Kirrin, and illustrated by Sam Kemp; Super Duper Moongirl And The Amazing Moon Dawdler by Wulf Moon, and illustrated by Alice Wang; Are You The Life Of The Party? by Mica Scotti kole, and illustrated by Josh Pemberton; Release From Service by Rustin Lovewell, and illustrated by Emerson Rabbitt; Dark Equations Of The Heart by David Cleden, and illustrated by Vytautas Vasiliauskas; An Itch by Christopher Baker, and illustrated by Jennifer Ober; Dirt Road Magic by Carrie Callahan, and illustrated by Yingying Jiang; A Certain Slant Of Light by Preston Dennett, and illustrated by Christine Rhee. L. Ron Hubbard wrote The Idealist, which was illustrated by Brian C. Hailes, Plus, he also wrote Tomorrow’s Miracles. Dean Wesley Smith wrote Lost Robot, inspired by Bob Eggleton’s One of Our Robots Is Missing, used as the cover of this issue. Rebecca Moesta wrote The Yellow Submarine, which was illustrated by David Furnal. Mike Resnick wrote Tips For Embryonic Pros, and David Forland wrote the Introduction. The illustrations appear in both color at the front of the book, as well as b&w with the stories. Only the best stories and illustrations were selected for this anthology, and each is rated in the overall final 5-Stars for their unique and exciting tales, in visual and words. I enjoyed the whole book, so will not pick any favorites. Highly recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Disclaimer: I received this book as a part of GoodReads' First Reads program. This is a collection of younger writers who won a contest in Science Fiction writing and also illustration contest winners. Also, for some reason, an essay on how to write and an essay and short story by Hubbard, who is definitely not a writer of the future, having died in 1986. I found the stories to be varying in quality, from good to bad, mostly okay, with Hubbard's two offerings to be very dated and somewhat adolesc Disclaimer: I received this book as a part of GoodReads' First Reads program. This is a collection of younger writers who won a contest in Science Fiction writing and also illustration contest winners. Also, for some reason, an essay on how to write and an essay and short story by Hubbard, who is definitely not a writer of the future, having died in 1986. I found the stories to be varying in quality, from good to bad, mostly okay, with Hubbard's two offerings to be very dated and somewhat adolescent. I think that younger readers would enjoy this collection more than older readers, and I am definitely in the latter category.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Cole

    This year's anthology, celebrating its 35th year around, reflects the darkness ever present in our modern times but all stories have a glimmer of hope at the end, a solution, a clever way to make things better. This "rainbow at the end" effect can help you believe, even in difficult times, not all is lost. There is a way out, you just have to find it. This year's winning writers have crafted beautiful stories with emotional resonance, intrigue, and adventure. The illustrators make amazing use of n This year's anthology, celebrating its 35th year around, reflects the darkness ever present in our modern times but all stories have a glimmer of hope at the end, a solution, a clever way to make things better. This "rainbow at the end" effect can help you believe, even in difficult times, not all is lost. There is a way out, you just have to find it. This year's winning writers have crafted beautiful stories with emotional resonance, intrigue, and adventure. The illustrators make amazing use of new and combined techniques to bring the stories to life. It's a great read for young and old to enjoy, and see what new artists are coming up with in the realm of speculative fiction.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Reavis

    I like this book for what it does as far as introducing the reader to new and upcoming writers in the science-fiction and fantasy genre. With that being said, only 2 of the stories in this volume stood out to me-"Release from Service" and "Dark Equations of the Heart". Those two stories were AMAZING. "Untrained Luck", "First Warden", and "Super-Duper Moon Girl" were also good, but after finishing those tales, I was left feeling slightly unfulfilled and wanting more-but that could just be my pers I like this book for what it does as far as introducing the reader to new and upcoming writers in the science-fiction and fantasy genre. With that being said, only 2 of the stories in this volume stood out to me-"Release from Service" and "Dark Equations of the Heart". Those two stories were AMAZING. "Untrained Luck", "First Warden", and "Super-Duper Moon Girl" were also good, but after finishing those tales, I was left feeling slightly unfulfilled and wanting more-but that could just be my personal preference.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    I read this as a result of a Kindle giveaway. I haven’t read an anthology in decades, but I’m glad I got the chance and am now looking forward to reading the previous version. While most of the stories are from new writers, their fresh ideas are a vivid contrast to the repetitious insane military/government leaders found in sci-fi today. I’m definitely looking forward to the longer, or follow up, versions of many of the included stories. Even if you’re like me and don’t typically read short stor I read this as a result of a Kindle giveaway. I haven’t read an anthology in decades, but I’m glad I got the chance and am now looking forward to reading the previous version. While most of the stories are from new writers, their fresh ideas are a vivid contrast to the repetitious insane military/government leaders found in sci-fi today. I’m definitely looking forward to the longer, or follow up, versions of many of the included stories. Even if you’re like me and don’t typically read short stories, give this one a chance.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    If you want to know who the next big scifi and fantasy authors will be in the coming years, read this book! With a variety of themes, there is a short story in the collection for everyone. If you are only going to read one, I highly recommend reading The First Warden by Kai Wolden. "Sometimes the gods are cruel, and sometimes they are kind; sometimes they need a person to show them the difference."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Another excellent anthology Writers of the future anthologies are always filled with great science fiction and the 35th edition is no different. You never know what to expect when starting the next story other than it will be very well written and often very thought provoking.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gerhardt Schuette

    Great Collection of stories Good way to find different types of stories. I look forward to reading these collections every year. Don’t be afraid to read earlier volumes. They will not disappoint you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. It was better than last year's volume, simply because the standout stories were of higher quality. As always, it's a bit uneven. But that's to be expected.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cindelu

    I won this Kindle book on Goodreads. I actually read only 3 of the stories. They were good. The others I began and d decided they weren't worth finishing.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lorenzo Samuel

    This volume #35 of L. Ron Hubbard Presents writers of the Future is magnificent. Over 3000 entries from aspiring writers compose the pile that judges of the supporting contest choose from. There are stories from the 12 quarterly winners and great illustrations from the 12 illustrator winners. The stories may lack some professionalism; however, they are original and fresh. As usual the volume contains a few stories from masters of the craft. The short story "The Idealist" by Hubbard (under one of This volume #35 of L. Ron Hubbard Presents writers of the Future is magnificent. Over 3000 entries from aspiring writers compose the pile that judges of the supporting contest choose from. There are stories from the 12 quarterly winners and great illustrations from the 12 illustrator winners. The stories may lack some professionalism; however, they are original and fresh. As usual the volume contains a few stories from masters of the craft. The short story "The Idealist" by Hubbard (under one of his pen names) is sandwiched in the book. The expert craftsman has spun another of his amazing tales. The judges of these stories are also masters and well known speculative-fiction authors. What seems to be the key judging point, although there are many others, seems to be originality. Highly recommended for writers and readers of any genre.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    "Sometimes the gods are cruel, and sometimes they are kind; sometimes they need a person to show them the difference." If you want to know who will pen the fantasy and scifi novels lining your bookshelf in the coming years, look no further. With a variety of genre-bending themes, there is a short story in the collection that everyone can enjoy. If you only have time for one, I highly recommend reading The First Warden by Kai Wolden. Vivid, evocative and full of primal magics, it's one of those st "Sometimes the gods are cruel, and sometimes they are kind; sometimes they need a person to show them the difference." If you want to know who will pen the fantasy and scifi novels lining your bookshelf in the coming years, look no further. With a variety of genre-bending themes, there is a short story in the collection that everyone can enjoy. If you only have time for one, I highly recommend reading The First Warden by Kai Wolden. Vivid, evocative and full of primal magics, it's one of those stories that make your heart ache in a way that reminds you what it is to love and how much in our short lives we have to loose. I eagerly look forward to more stories in this universe.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex Fox

  19. 4 out of 5

    shamus curtis

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dulce Crosslin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Drew Ericsson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Peter Neumann

  23. 4 out of 5

    D.A. D’Amico

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Lilla

  25. 5 out of 5

    norman hoefler

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lamar

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Doss-haskell

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jack Young

  29. 4 out of 5

    Belinda Perkinson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scot Hanson

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