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In You, Inc. Beckwith provides practical tips, anecdotes and insights based on his 30 years of marketing and selling his advertising services. Beckwith learned early on in his career that no matter what product you're selling, the most important component of the product is you. In You, Inc.: A Field Guide to Selling Yourself, Beckwith relates tantalizing tidbits and real s In You, Inc. Beckwith provides practical tips, anecdotes and insights based on his 30 years of marketing and selling his advertising services. Beckwith learned early on in his career that no matter what product you're selling, the most important component of the product is you. In You, Inc.: A Field Guide to Selling Yourself, Beckwith relates tantalizing tidbits and real stories of how to harness your enthusiasm with an ability to impress your key accounts.Written in his traditional homespun style, Beckwith offers doses of humour and pithy knowledge to anyone who wants to seal the deal and thrive in business.


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In You, Inc. Beckwith provides practical tips, anecdotes and insights based on his 30 years of marketing and selling his advertising services. Beckwith learned early on in his career that no matter what product you're selling, the most important component of the product is you. In You, Inc.: A Field Guide to Selling Yourself, Beckwith relates tantalizing tidbits and real s In You, Inc. Beckwith provides practical tips, anecdotes and insights based on his 30 years of marketing and selling his advertising services. Beckwith learned early on in his career that no matter what product you're selling, the most important component of the product is you. In You, Inc.: A Field Guide to Selling Yourself, Beckwith relates tantalizing tidbits and real stories of how to harness your enthusiasm with an ability to impress your key accounts.Written in his traditional homespun style, Beckwith offers doses of humour and pithy knowledge to anyone who wants to seal the deal and thrive in business.

30 review for You, Inc.: The Art of Selling Yourself

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    The most impressive thing about this book is the punctuation of the title. In a modern day book title, one rarely sees a comma, a period, and a colon. From this title, you might infer that this is a book about how prostitutes can form corporate business entities. That would have been a better book. Instead, You, Inc.: The Art of Selling Yourself is basically a rehash of Dale Carneige and of everyone who, to date, has rehashed him. This book was thoroughly so-so. It consists of short one- or two-pa The most impressive thing about this book is the punctuation of the title. In a modern day book title, one rarely sees a comma, a period, and a colon. From this title, you might infer that this is a book about how prostitutes can form corporate business entities. That would have been a better book. Instead, You, Inc.: The Art of Selling Yourself is basically a rehash of Dale Carneige and of everyone who, to date, has rehashed him. This book was thoroughly so-so. It consists of short one- or two-page "chapters" with a snippet of advice on how to, I guess, improve your salesmanship. The advice consists of warmed-over generalities. For instance, did you know that it is important to listen (I mean really listen) to your customers? Did you know that it was important to treat the support-staff with respect? Did you know that it was important to avoid talking down to your readers?...oops.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Thomas

    ebook: https://goo.gl/VSNSMm goodreads: https://goo.gl/P0tNkR ---------------------------------------------- The first thing you sell is yourself. People "buy" optimists because they enjoy their company. Attitude sells. People value - and pay more for - the way you make them feel. People buy "feelings". What is your specialty? To truly thrive, learn what makes you uncomfortable. Be grateful for your strengths, but work on your weaknesses. Your strengths will take you only as far as your weaknesses wil ebook: https://goo.gl/VSNSMm goodreads: https://goo.gl/P0tNkR ---------------------------------------------- The first thing you sell is yourself. People "buy" optimists because they enjoy their company. Attitude sells. People value - and pay more for - the way you make them feel. People buy "feelings". What is your specialty? To truly thrive, learn what makes you uncomfortable. Be grateful for your strengths, but work on your weaknesses. Your strengths will take you only as far as your weaknesses will allow. Seek tough love. People do not gather data to make a decision; they often gather it to justify their decision. The first thing to plan for is your first impression. Keep reading, keep listening, keep learning. The future belongs to the communicators. Simplify and clarify. Communicate so that you cannot be misunderstood. Pros focus not just on words, but silence. A pause give the listener and chance to breathe. Watch your white space, silence talks. Be careful in complimenting yourself. Tell stories. Put the audience, not you, in the story's hero's shoes. Your key sentence in every presentation is your first. Find your message, keep it simple, and repeat it often. Revise every memo, then revise it again. Read it out loud and ask, "How can this be said more succinctly?" Brevity is power. Cut every document in half. Read everything you write aloud. Listening makes you captivating. People speak too much and listen too little. We mistrust words, but we trust - and we praise - listeners. Listen - actively and often - always. Before you speak, take one second. We do not remember words well. We remember images. Put your entire body into it. A great presentation must be motivational. A poor teacher describes; a good teacher explains; an excellent teacher demonstrates; a great teacher inspires. Great presentations are not intellectual; they are spiritual. Don't impress them; move them. Look them in the eyes. Constantly. In speaking, as in so many things in life, less is more. Speak for 22 minutes. Keep it short. Don't just make it brief. Make if a little briefer. Let your jokes be on you. Reach the head through the heart. Honor each person's craving to feel important. We want to feel loved, no matter how well we hide it. Make the person feel important. Before you do anything else, make the other person comfortable. A relationship starts with comfort. Reply quickly. Do everything fast. Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest. Be a source. If your problem falls outside those areas, we will help you find the person for that issue. Get on to common ground, and praise other not yourself. Before you meet, and in the first seconds after you do, find common ground. To establish common ground, mimic your listener's pace. If you're not five minutes early, you're five minutes late. Always, on time. Above all, people choose the reliable. Be there. Bot the "I's". Not everyone does. Be predicable. You tend to experience what you believe you will. Belief works. Life is not what you make it. It is how you take it. First rule: make yourself uncomfortable. Push - if it hurts, good! Believe. Your clients will act as if they have no choice but to agree. Don't be merely confident; be certain. People aren't rational. They choose the tiny over the huge; so sweat the tiny stuff. There is no such thing as too grateful or too appreciative. Thank people unforgettably. Never talk politics nor religion. Keep every secret. Admit a weakness. Always be fair. The rewards come and the penalties are huge. Praise often; flatter - never. Beware of playing the role of the tough guy. Prove yourself with your price. Follow up within a day.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tiff Miller

    Frankly, I feel like this is a must-read for anyone starting and/or running their own business. It's applicable to birth work, and not a lot of resources really are. The chapters are short (some are only a sentence), easy to read and process, and have a high take-away value. I really appreciated the frank, succinct, and conversational tone of this book. It isn't any longer than it needs to be, but it lacks nothing in the way of inspiration and information. Since it was written recently, it also h Frankly, I feel like this is a must-read for anyone starting and/or running their own business. It's applicable to birth work, and not a lot of resources really are. The chapters are short (some are only a sentence), easy to read and process, and have a high take-away value. I really appreciated the frank, succinct, and conversational tone of this book. It isn't any longer than it needs to be, but it lacks nothing in the way of inspiration and information. Since it was written recently, it also has some good applications for modern business owners. Overall, I came away with some practical things I can start doing right now, today, to better my business. For a book that seems primarily inspirational and motivational, it has a lot of practical application! It's not a "how-to" manual, by any means. It is, however, an excellent source of the right road to take in business. Not a map, exactly, since a map shows your destination. It's more like a great set of road signs, easily understandable, and clearly written. I checked this book out at the library on a recommendation, and I plan to buy it for my personal library. That's how much it impressed me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    Loy Machedo’s Book Review – You, Inc. When I was a young man, the first book I got my hands on was the Bible. Now for those of you who are spiritual enthusiasts, well, you may rejoice at this fact. Others may smile with the peace knowing that yes, I may be blessed and will get my seat heaven. But on the other hand for the non-spiritual or non-Christian community, this piece of information would be meaningless. The Good News (no pun intended) of reading the Bible – It improved my ability to read, Loy Machedo’s Book Review – You, Inc. When I was a young man, the first book I got my hands on was the Bible. Now for those of you who are spiritual enthusiasts, well, you may rejoice at this fact. Others may smile with the peace knowing that yes, I may be blessed and will get my seat heaven. But on the other hand for the non-spiritual or non-Christian community, this piece of information would be meaningless. The Good News (no pun intended) of reading the Bible – It improved my ability to read, my thirst for knowledge, the desire to become a good story teller and yes, a fundamental fear of a Christian sky god, whom I would occasionally remember when it was time for getting Christmas gifts or Easter Eggs (or for that matter when I wanted to pass in my exam or get lucky with a girl in my school). Today, thanks to the teachings of this brilliant piece of literature, I am an atheist. But apart from that particular contribution to my life, I do not think the principles mentioned in any of the pages contributed that very much to my career or personal growth. Why do I say this? I am not using any of those war-stories or witty one liners in either my personal or professional life. But here is the twist. If I could go back in time and hand myself a book that I personally believe would make a big change in life, both personally, professionally and yeah, spiritually – You, Inc. would be that book. You, Inc.—written by the husband and wife team of Harry Beckwith and Christine Clifford Beckwith, parents of six - is composed of around 300 pages with around 275 chapters. (Can you believe this? There were no markings as to how many chapters there were in this book! So I actually counted the number of chapters in this book!!!) And each and every chapter is so beautifully adorned with the wisdom and wit of the ages, that once you begin reading it, it becomes like an addictive chocolate. The uniqueness of this book is that is it so compelling, so captivating and so condensed, you cannot but want to read this book once you get your hands on it. In fact, one of the greatest features about this book is that you can turn any chapter and read it without reading the preceding chapters – And it would still make sense! Seriously, I do not wish to give away any of the nuggets in this book for free because I believe this is one book worth keeping and giving to whomsoever you love. So, If there was a book which I feel whose practical application can change a person for the better, both personally, professionally and spiritually with tips that are easy to adopt, adept and administer, this would be among the top of my list. One of those rare kind of books which you would want to keep at an arms reach, just in case you would want to brag or share tit-bits of wisdom that can amaze your audience and add a warm feeling of realization to your life. Overall Rating A perfect 10 out of 10. Loy Machedo loymachedo.com

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    Useful, but not groundbreaking, advice on selling yourself. It's often unconventional and nonconformist. Like Beckwith's other books that I've read, this one is based more on his experience and opinions than research. The content is quite similar to What Clients Love, which Beckwith published 4 years earlier. Notes Good salespeople sell themselves, their company, then their product, then talk about price (how little it will cost to have benefit). Bad salespeople go in opposite order. You can only i Useful, but not groundbreaking, advice on selling yourself. It's often unconventional and nonconformist. Like Beckwith's other books that I've read, this one is based more on his experience and opinions than research. The content is quite similar to What Clients Love, which Beckwith published 4 years earlier. Notes Good salespeople sell themselves, their company, then their product, then talk about price (how little it will cost to have benefit). Bad salespeople go in opposite order. You can only improve your strengths so much, and usually not enough for people to notice. But people notice your weaknesses, so work on them. Your strengths will take you only as far as your weaknesses will allow. Don't try to think outside your box. It has worked for you. Instead, expand your box by bringing new ideas into it. People base trust more on ability to communicate then on credentials. Telling a story that tells your prospects how you can help them is more powerful than listing your capabilities or credentials. Show how your client overcame their challenges. Tell stories that make your clients the heroes, and make your prospects identify with them. They will see how you can help them. First rule of sales and marketing: you are who you appear to be. Pause one second before answering, so the other person knows you heard them, rather than race to reply. What clients value An association of professionals surveyed over 300 clients about what they valued most: 1. Interest in long-term relationship 2. Speed of response (didn't matter if professional could answer client's question in this response) 3-7. Other attributes 8. Technical skills 9. Fees Clients remember companies that refer to others when they can't help. People don't want to hear how good you are. They want to hear how good they can be with your help. People choose the reliable performer in a market. The key to successful relationships is predictability consistency People buy from people they like, because they like the salesperson's heart (spirit, enthusiasm, warmth), not their head (intelligence, persuasiveness). To overcome the coldness of the call, overcome the recipient's stereotype of you. Before or early in the call, say or do something to show you don't fit the stereotype. Admit weaknesses and mistakes, and people will perceive you as honest and trustworthy. When you lose a deal, send a note thanking the prospect for considering you, and offering to be available if things change. In 2 months, remind them that you're there to help.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Clair

    This book is wonderful. Beckwith's creative, clear, and compassionate voice, as well as Clifford's vast array of anecdotal stories combine to make a "career book" into a real joy. Chapters are short and concise, one or two pages long, and the font is large! This is great because it makes ideas quickly accessible and gives more time for reflection, it also makes it one of those books you can keep on your desk and return to daily to look up a new positive habit to practice. I read this book right This book is wonderful. Beckwith's creative, clear, and compassionate voice, as well as Clifford's vast array of anecdotal stories combine to make a "career book" into a real joy. Chapters are short and concise, one or two pages long, and the font is large! This is great because it makes ideas quickly accessible and gives more time for reflection, it also makes it one of those books you can keep on your desk and return to daily to look up a new positive habit to practice. I read this book right as my job search was starting and it really helped me to level my head and feel comfortable in myself as a potential employee when facing career fairs and interviews. I also connected with Mr. Beckwith and Ms. Clifford on Linkedin shortly after reading the book and sent them both InMail's telling them how helpful their book has been for me...their responses were absolutely wonderful and inspiring! Great book written by good people, and applicable to any career person at any stage of life.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    I've read this book twice, and love it so much that now I'm listening to the audio book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave Irwin

    This book definitely shows its age, both in the references and some of the ideas around gender and style. There are however many good points in the book. In many cases, people say that business or self-improvement books could have just been an essay. This book feels like a collection of essays or small blog posts, pushed together into a book. There are anecdotes, stories, and lessons strewn throughout, almost haphazardly. I feel like a lot of them are off-base, but they do read quick and can the This book definitely shows its age, both in the references and some of the ideas around gender and style. There are however many good points in the book. In many cases, people say that business or self-improvement books could have just been an essay. This book feels like a collection of essays or small blog posts, pushed together into a book. There are anecdotes, stories, and lessons strewn throughout, almost haphazardly. I feel like a lot of them are off-base, but they do read quick and can therefore be quickly discarded. The book was written for a time, and timing, before the age of social media and its madcap dash through daily life. It comes from an era of 12 minute TV intervals, as opposed to the 6 to 30 second intervals of today. In some ways, this is a charm and in others, it is out of touch. I feel like this is a book in dire need of update. I feel like some self-help guru could rewrite this into a dozen books, it is so packed with different stories around how to conduct yourself in the world of business, but package it for a post-2020 world. Favourite lesson: To get the right help, ask the right questions. When presenting any ideas, go over them with someone before hand. An example given in the book "I think this might work, but I value your opinion, what might work even better?". I doubt I would read this again, simply because I do think the lessons are from a different era. It would be like taking business etiquette lessons from Don Draper and applying them to todays climate. Not wrong perhaps, but from a different time. Still, I will come back and read specific portions that struck me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dries Ketels

    This review is going to be fairly short. I've read the whole book and although found some nice insights and rules of thumb that I will use throughout my next 70 years of life. I did found that the author was lacking in credibility. Almost non of the claims the author made where backed up and several of the claims he made where simply wrong. Here's one of them: The author claims that one of the most common first words of babies is "Story". He adds that this is true for every continent and all eth This review is going to be fairly short. I've read the whole book and although found some nice insights and rules of thumb that I will use throughout my next 70 years of life. I did found that the author was lacking in credibility. Almost non of the claims the author made where backed up and several of the claims he made where simply wrong. Here's one of them: The author claims that one of the most common first words of babies is "Story". He adds that this is true for every continent and all ethnicity's. He claims this to validate his point of view on how important stories are for communication and how babies (and therefore people in general) learn through stories. Although I do agree on the importance of stories. After my own research (google search) I found that the word "story" is not even in the '100 most common first words' that babies use. There are to many obvious little lies like this throughout this book. The author didn't put in enough research in it, sometimes he feels like a salesman trying to trick people in believing him. Enjoy your search for the perfect book, Cheers, D. Ps: The study I found and refer to was published just several years before this book was first published so the author could have found that piece of research easily.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Asparagus

    Lots of interesting quotable quotes, inspiring perspectives, and advice (cliche and counter-cliche) but could use a little more depth, more story and some additional research to back up some of the claims.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Perry

    A good book on how to be a likable seller, not a book on how to sell. Very short, sometimes underdeveloped, stories with anecdotes from business and life. Easy to read. From the same school as How to Win Friends and Influence people, but choppier and less fluid.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Farrell

    I've tried reading this book a few times now, and I simply can't. It's poorly written, and just feels strange. It definitely seems like there's some content here that could be useful, but it's like it's written for toddlers. It just drove me insane, so I gave up.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

    I wasn't sold on the approach taken here to deliver the content. Was it my fault for doing the audiobook? Or was it that I was listening to it while sick? Maybe it was when my laptop froze about halfway into disc #2? It could still be decent, though...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marian Melnychuk

    In general, the book is ok, but nothing new inside. Also, have one very healthy though that probably we don't have to search new in the scope of this topic, probably just need to follow rules which we already know.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rashida Serrant-Davis

    Recommended by Larry Bailin in his book "Mommy, Where do Customers Come From?", I felt it worth the time. Lots of nuggets. I don't agree with everything, like the big rant against PowerPoint, but there were a lot of reminders of simple wisdom that we often forget about.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sally Cripe

    Interesting, inspiring and engaging. Good for motivation. You can just pick this up any time and read a bite. I liked it. Quick read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Good read, great points in here. I don't agree with everything here, and got bored in the latter half, but I would recommend it to some degree.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katieloowho

    some good reminders and tips!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Solko

    Straightforward advice on presenting to people and making yourself interesting to others.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Henry Adewusi

    Nice!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tyra

    Excellent life advice.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cesar Zurita

    The good: shot book, with lot of interesting ideas and easy-to-remember and use principles. The bad: the book lacks of structure

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andy Bintoro

    The book have a bit of this and a bit of that. How to sell yourself is that how you could survive and got jobs or business to live

  24. 5 out of 5

    LeAnna

    March read for #theunreadshelfproject2019 (Book that’s been on your shelf the longest) Prompt 17 for #ReadHarder

  25. 5 out of 5

    Clay Ashworth

    Characters: The stories only character would have to be the narrator (the author). I would rate the characters as a 5 because he was friendly and sounded like a nice person just having a conversation rather than giving me a lecture. The author acts as if he is just talking to the reader and giving him advice. The book is about how to better yourself so by having the nice character voice to the text gives the book an easy hook to not put down. “If you worry ‘is my idea professional?’ it probably Characters: The stories only character would have to be the narrator (the author). I would rate the characters as a 5 because he was friendly and sounded like a nice person just having a conversation rather than giving me a lecture. The author acts as if he is just talking to the reader and giving him advice. The book is about how to better yourself so by having the nice character voice to the text gives the book an easy hook to not put down. “If you worry ‘is my idea professional?’ it probably isn’t” (Beckwith, Pg. 79). This expresses the characters voice and how he jokes with the reader as friends. Language: The writer’s language was friendly and outgoing which is why I would give it an outstanding 5. The author’s tone is very easy to get along with it. When the author asks questions to the reader, it gives them a sense of being a part of the story. Overall the language helps the book become easier to read and more of a fin environment that allows the reader to resist the urge of putting the book down. “Do what you love, and the pleasure of doing what you love will follow” (Beckwith, Pg. 179). This shows the writers tone in making the reader a better person. Information: Being that is was an informational text; the information presented gives the book a rating of 5. The topic was about the art of selling and how to better sell yourself. The author presented this idea rather radically but his friendly tone helped the reader understand and relate. His explanation of the idea was clear and precise with many relative ideas to give evidence to give the reader a better idea of what they are learning to do. “”Cultivate your mastery, but cultivate the rest of you” (Beckwith, Pg. 137). This quote explains how the author wants the reader to worry on his motives. Theme: The theme of the book would be a rating of 5. The theme was how to better sell things and how to talk more confidently to people while doing this task. The title pretty much sums up the whole theme of this book. It is straight forward and explains the different ways to sell. “Wins come and go. If you persist, losses can, too” (Beckwith, Pg. 265). The quote tells how to stick to winning. Personal Response: I personally would recommend this book to everyone. It is very helpful to me because it helped me learn how to talk to people not only in sales, but in public as well.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anna Sabino

    Great read. I really liked the book's format and size. From the cross-cultural examples to quoting famous speeches and stories of those, who are doing something that matters this book offers great reminders and tools to "expand our boxes." The authors remind us of customers' behaviors of acting irrationally, on impulse and being guided by love. Harry and Christine in You Inc. are taking the stigma off selling and replace it with normal. They emphasize that it's wise to craft our stories and pitc Great read. I really liked the book's format and size. From the cross-cultural examples to quoting famous speeches and stories of those, who are doing something that matters this book offers great reminders and tools to "expand our boxes." The authors remind us of customers' behaviors of acting irrationally, on impulse and being guided by love. Harry and Christine in You Inc. are taking the stigma off selling and replace it with normal. They emphasize that it's wise to craft our stories and pitches putting our customers in the spotlight. We will always love being reminded how smart and important we are. It makes us happy when others remember our names or when they return our phone calls promptly. All these subtle messages are telling us that we matter.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ann Collette

    This is a tapas of helpful advice on presenting yourself well. (By "tapas" I'm refering to the structure, which is organized in easily read, short and tasty segments of one to three pages of individualized advice.) The tone of the book is chatty and down to earth, with each each segment of advice, geared towards those in sales but applicable to anyone who's concerned about making a good first impression, easy to grasp. Some of the advice might seem very basic but the authors recognize that and This is a tapas of helpful advice on presenting yourself well. (By "tapas" I'm refering to the structure, which is organized in easily read, short and tasty segments of one to three pages of individualized advice.) The tone of the book is chatty and down to earth, with each each segment of advice, geared towards those in sales but applicable to anyone who's concerned about making a good first impression, easy to grasp. Some of the advice might seem very basic but the authors recognize that and challenge the reader not to be complacent about it. Instead, they encourage the reader to make sure you're acting on such knowledge. I picked up a few helpful tips about interacting with those I'd like to convince to work with me, in my capacity as a literary agent, and feel this is a very helpful business book -- even for those who, like me, don't like to read business books! The format of the book is one of it's greatest strengths. You can read a few segments, put the book down, walk away and think about what you read then come back to the book hours later and fall right back into it again without any problem. And the advice is basically rock solid though, depending on your occupation, you may want to temper it a bit. Still, you put the book down having respect for the authors -- not just for what they teach you but because they do it with grace and generousity -- and want to make sure you, as a business person, will operate in the same manner. Sure, they want to help you make money but it's pretty clear they don't advocate screwing others to do so and that greed is not something they advocate. Their bottom line is sure, let's make some money but first and foremost, let us show you the way to be happy in your work and rewards, both financial and emotional, will likely then follow.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sean Goh

    The message of Daniel Pink's To Sell Is Human, a few years in advance. The first thing you sell is yourself. Life is more like high school (values popularity) rather than college (values mastery). Understand your stereotype, understand how you are perceived based on how you introduce yourself. The first rule of communication: Communicate such that you cannot be misunderstood. Credentials come from your past, and to others may not reveal much about your current ability to meet their needs. All good pre The message of Daniel Pink's To Sell Is Human, a few years in advance. The first thing you sell is yourself. Life is more like high school (values popularity) rather than college (values mastery). Understand your stereotype, understand how you are perceived based on how you introduce yourself. The first rule of communication: Communicate such that you cannot be misunderstood. Credentials come from your past, and to others may not reveal much about your current ability to meet their needs. All good presentations convey that their subject MATTERS. And leave their audiences desiring more. Put the audience, not yourself, in the hero's shoes. Craft a compelling lead, and then another. Read aloud what you write to catch the mistakes. Visual aids (slides) diminish one's understanding and recall because "I've got it on the slides" Make ten jokes, make a hundred enemies. Only joke about yourself. Prompt replies and arrivals make the other feel important. Above all else, people choose the reliable performer. Predictability (=/=boring and repetitive), more of steadiness is key to successful relationships. There is no such thing as too grateful or too appreciative. Bargain shoppers want more benefits for less money. Fire such customers. Don't seek reassurance. Seek change. Invest in things that matter. The greatest compliment you can pay someone is "I understand something deep in your heart."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mario MJ Perron

    This book was amazing for me. It's about so very much more than selling. It's about listening and knowing, to yourself, and to others. It's about believing in your heart and your values. It's about giving of yourself as the best selling tool you have. It's about building relationships. The authors write from personal experience and always demonstrate one of their main concepts that contribute to success in selling, they relate their experiences to your needs.. well, they did for me, and I believe This book was amazing for me. It's about so very much more than selling. It's about listening and knowing, to yourself, and to others. It's about believing in your heart and your values. It's about giving of yourself as the best selling tool you have. It's about building relationships. The authors write from personal experience and always demonstrate one of their main concepts that contribute to success in selling, they relate their experiences to your needs.. well, they did for me, and I believe they would for you as well. They seem to understand the human condition and speak directly from their hearts to ours. The writing is flawless and very easy to read, almost conversational. The concepts are all illustrated clearly and well inter-connected. The best books on this topic I've read, so far. Jim Stovall recommended to read this book and I am so happy to pass that excellent recommendation forward. Wishing you success, good luck, and good reading. M.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mischa

    As the authors themselves claim this book probably wont teach you anything you didn't already know. What it did manage to teach me however was a strategy for remembering the names of people I meet. That alone is invaluable to me. Though I new I was a visual person I had never seriously considered how this effected me remembering names. For the past week I have been practicing assigning a "visual memory clue" to the name of anyone I meet. Its amazing how well it works. Just never tell the person As the authors themselves claim this book probably wont teach you anything you didn't already know. What it did manage to teach me however was a strategy for remembering the names of people I meet. That alone is invaluable to me. Though I new I was a visual person I had never seriously considered how this effected me remembering names. For the past week I have been practicing assigning a "visual memory clue" to the name of anyone I meet. Its amazing how well it works. Just never tell the person what image you associated with their name the first time you met. It might get a bit awkward lol.

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