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"Perhaps there is no simple, easy way to educate children about the Holocaust. Yet [this] new extraordinary work in the form of a nonfiction graphic novel for children is a valiant attempt to do just that. These testimonials... serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again."--BookTrib Between 1933 and 1945, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party were responsibl "Perhaps there is no simple, easy way to educate children about the Holocaust. Yet [this] new extraordinary work in the form of a nonfiction graphic novel for children is a valiant attempt to do just that. These testimonials... serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again."--BookTrib Between 1933 and 1945, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party were responsible for the persecution of millions of Jews across Europe. This extraordinary graphic novel tells the true stories of six Jewish children who survived the Holocaust. From suffering the horrors of Auschwitz, to hiding from Nazi soldiers in war-torn Paris, to sheltering from the Blitz in England, each true story is a powerful testament to the survivors' courage. These remarkable testimonials serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again. Features a current photograph of each contributor and an update about their lives, along with a glossary and timeline to support reader understanding of this period in world history.


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"Perhaps there is no simple, easy way to educate children about the Holocaust. Yet [this] new extraordinary work in the form of a nonfiction graphic novel for children is a valiant attempt to do just that. These testimonials... serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again."--BookTrib Between 1933 and 1945, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party were responsibl "Perhaps there is no simple, easy way to educate children about the Holocaust. Yet [this] new extraordinary work in the form of a nonfiction graphic novel for children is a valiant attempt to do just that. These testimonials... serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again."--BookTrib Between 1933 and 1945, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party were responsible for the persecution of millions of Jews across Europe. This extraordinary graphic novel tells the true stories of six Jewish children who survived the Holocaust. From suffering the horrors of Auschwitz, to hiding from Nazi soldiers in war-torn Paris, to sheltering from the Blitz in England, each true story is a powerful testament to the survivors' courage. These remarkable testimonials serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again. Features a current photograph of each contributor and an update about their lives, along with a glossary and timeline to support reader understanding of this period in world history.

30 review for Survivors of the Holocaust: True Stories of Six Extraordinary Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    This graphic novel tells the stories of six Jewish children who survived the Holocaust during World War II. Some were evacuated to England...others were hidden....and some were sent to concentration camps. Most were separated from their parents and never saw them again. It is amazing what children can survive. They are often stronger and more resilient than adults. This book is moving and meaningful. The stories are truthful, but not too graphic for children to read. The art is fantastic. Due to This graphic novel tells the stories of six Jewish children who survived the Holocaust during World War II. Some were evacuated to England...others were hidden....and some were sent to concentration camps. Most were separated from their parents and never saw them again. It is amazing what children can survive. They are often stronger and more resilient than adults. This book is moving and meaningful. The stories are truthful, but not too graphic for children to read. The art is fantastic. Due to the nature of the stories, I do recommend parental guidance for younger children. Death, starvation, internment, separation from family.....the subject matter is dark. But I think it's important that the events never be forgotten. Although we are not Jewish, several members of my extended family who stayed in Germany when the rest emigrated to America were killed by the Nazis during the war. Most were killed for being Catholics who refused to embrace the Nazi regime. The stories in this book left me thinking about what my own family members....and millions of others....endured. I can't even imagine how scared they must have been. It made for a very emotional reading experience for me. My children all grew up safe, well fed, loved and protected. A whole generation of children during the war did not. Bombs. Executions. Starvation. Gas chambers. It is important for there to be books like this, because if we don't allow it to be forgotten then maybe it won't happen again. The artwork is fantastic. The stories emotional and hard-hitting. Wonderful book! **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from Sourcebooks via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    A beautiful short graphic novel biography collection of six stories of Holocaust survivors with unique and necessary stories about how they were able to elude death at the hands of Hitler, Nazi Germany, and in one case, Mengele. In it's simplicity, it can be an introduction for younger readers but for older readers it was understanding the desperate measures certain families went to to allow their children a chance at survival-- like a neighbor (during a home raid) pretending that the young girl A beautiful short graphic novel biography collection of six stories of Holocaust survivors with unique and necessary stories about how they were able to elude death at the hands of Hitler, Nazi Germany, and in one case, Mengele. In it's simplicity, it can be an introduction for younger readers but for older readers it was understanding the desperate measures certain families went to to allow their children a chance at survival-- like a neighbor (during a home raid) pretending that the young girl was her daughter and walked out of the apartment with her-- she never saw her parents again. Or being shipped off to strangers to live on farms without running water or electricity simply as a means of basic survival. It demonstrates the harshness of the reality of the situation and how as young children, understanding was the last thing that came- survival came first. The graphic novelization of it reminds me of Hidden and is a perfect segue into framing the discussion for a younger audience but capturing the more stories for a group of survivors that are slowly disappearing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tia

    A very good introduction of the Holocaust experience for children. The six stories were short, but impactful. I could quickly connect with each of the children in their individual stories. The graphics were really good as well. I highly recommend. Quick thoughts Thank you to Sourcebooks Explore for the advanced eARC of this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    This is an adaptation of a BBC program called "The Children of the Holocaust" wherein interviews of six Holocaust survivors now living in England are turned into animated stories. The visuals are striking, and the stories are varied though uniformly heartbreaking. It's a good introduction to an extremely heavy topic. A trailer for the show is available here: http://fettleanimation.com/portfolio/... More information about the program is available here (but the clips don't work in the U.S.): https://w This is an adaptation of a BBC program called "The Children of the Holocaust" wherein interviews of six Holocaust survivors now living in England are turned into animated stories. The visuals are striking, and the stories are varied though uniformly heartbreaking. It's a good introduction to an extremely heavy topic. A trailer for the show is available here: http://fettleanimation.com/portfolio/... More information about the program is available here (but the clips don't work in the U.S.): https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01z...

  5. 5 out of 5

    soleil

    Horrifying.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Graphic novels of all types are hugely popular with middle grade students making this the ideal time to publish a Holocaust account aimed at that age group. Inside this book are the brief accounts of six young Jewish children whose lives were turned upside down during WW II; yet they were all able to survive and go on to live productive lives and make significant contributions to society. The graphics remind me of those in "The Faithful Spy" by Jon Hendrix. Using proportion and spare lines and c Graphic novels of all types are hugely popular with middle grade students making this the ideal time to publish a Holocaust account aimed at that age group. Inside this book are the brief accounts of six young Jewish children whose lives were turned upside down during WW II; yet they were all able to survive and go on to live productive lives and make significant contributions to society. The graphics remind me of those in "The Faithful Spy" by Jon Hendrix. Using proportion and spare lines and color, they communicate the gravity of the situation to the reader. Also included are present photos of the six survivors, a glossary, an illustrated timeline and additional resources. This would make a fabulous classroom resource for studying WW II. Thank you to Sourcebooks Kids and NetGalley for a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bex

    Presenting six tragic stories of the Holocaust through the memories of six people, then children, who experienced first hand has (to my knowledge) rarely, if ever, been done in the form of a graphic novel and I think it really works. Whilst the illustrations are particularly basic and could benefit from being less so in order to capture younger readers, the stories and the illustrated version of the children are really compelling. The book is divided into six sections, one for each child, and sh Presenting six tragic stories of the Holocaust through the memories of six people, then children, who experienced first hand has (to my knowledge) rarely, if ever, been done in the form of a graphic novel and I think it really works. Whilst the illustrations are particularly basic and could benefit from being less so in order to capture younger readers, the stories and the illustrated version of the children are really compelling. The book is divided into six sections, one for each child, and showcase the events starting with the Nuremberg Law in 1935 legalising anti-Jewish measures, Kristallnacht (the night of broken glass, various concentration camps including Dachau and Auschwitz-Birkenau, air raids in the Blitz and Mengele's cruelty. I was really impressed with the scale of this and what this novel achieves in fairly few words. Many of these terms may be unknown to younger readers, for whom I think this text is best intended, and for this reason the author has helpfully included a simplified glossary of terms to help familiarise or explain such terms. Equally there is a nice addition at the end of the book detailed what happened next to each of the children. The scale of the destruction is uncomfortable but important to share: 6 million people died during this time, but over one and a half MILLION of those people were children. The six voices speaking into the dark here, the six children featured in this story, are now adults who not only want their voices heard, their stories told but want texts like these to be popular choices on the shelves of schools to help educate a younger generation to learn from the mistakes of some of their predecessors. It's easy to think that something like this, of such a magnitude, would never happen again; books like this hopefully contribute to making that a reality. I love that the author has thought to put this into graphic novel form - it works, it's original and I think it will certainly resonate with young readers without causing too much distress or being too dense in the way that a heavier novel might do. ARC provided free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    DaNae

    This book did what it did well. It is just not the best time for me to read it. When we are living in a moment when every news stories brings grim news, it hard to be reminded of the very worst of what humanity has done. There is little to no joy in each of the stories. The reader only gets the satifaction that each of children survived. There will be readers for it, but I do think there is plenty out there for the young holocaust reader. If your library collection needs more it is a good additi This book did what it did well. It is just not the best time for me to read it. When we are living in a moment when every news stories brings grim news, it hard to be reminded of the very worst of what humanity has done. There is little to no joy in each of the stories. The reader only gets the satifaction that each of children survived. There will be readers for it, but I do think there is plenty out there for the young holocaust reader. If your library collection needs more it is a good addition, but I wouldn't shelve it among the graphic novels rather with the war histories.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonah Garner

    I think most Jewish kids growing up in WW2 would experience most of these stories, but overall good book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This amazing book takes complex stories of children surviving the holocaust, and tells them in simple, easy to read and understand form. Even if you didn't know what happened with the nazis and the jews, this book would explain enough about it that you could understand. These children all survived, of course, to tell their stories, but each one survived in a different way. One child, who hid in the countryside of France didn't even know the war was over for two years, as she basically lived as a This amazing book takes complex stories of children surviving the holocaust, and tells them in simple, easy to read and understand form. Even if you didn't know what happened with the nazis and the jews, this book would explain enough about it that you could understand. These children all survived, of course, to tell their stories, but each one survived in a different way. One child, who hid in the countryside of France didn't even know the war was over for two years, as she basically lived as a indentured servant. The pictures are stunning, and simple at the same time. Highly recommend this to libraries and schools. It is a good starting point to learn about what happened in World War II. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    What stands out to me about these stories is how most of them don't involve experiences in concentration camps. It is important that the world knows that Jewish people had many, many different kinds of harrowing experiences even if they didn't end up in a concentration camp (which, of course, is horrible). It isn't clear exactly who the audience is, as the artwork and narration style are fairly simplistic but there are concepts presented that would definitely go over the heads of younger readers What stands out to me about these stories is how most of them don't involve experiences in concentration camps. It is important that the world knows that Jewish people had many, many different kinds of harrowing experiences even if they didn't end up in a concentration camp (which, of course, is horrible). It isn't clear exactly who the audience is, as the artwork and narration style are fairly simplistic but there are concepts presented that would definitely go over the heads of younger readers. It's not anything that can't be remedied by an adult helping them to process the information, but it is worth noting nevertheless. The use of symbols (particularly the swastika) is particularly powerful in the artwork.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I feel like this is a beautiful introduction for children. Obviously, you never want kids to see the worst of humanity, but it's very important that we prevent things like the holocaust from happening and to do that we can NEVER forget it. These six children didn't understand what was happening to them either, but it happened. The holocaust shows us the worst of humanity, but through brave people that resisted we can see some of the best of humanity.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing a review copy. Review to come.

  14. 4 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    Perhaps there is no simple, easy way to educate children about the Holocaust. Yet a new extraordinary work in the form of a nonfiction graphic novel for children is a valiant attempt to do just that. Survivors of the Holocaust: True Stories of Six Extraordinary Children (Sourcebooks) tells the true stories of six Jewish children and young people who survived the Holocaust. From suffering the horrors of Auschwitz, to hiding from Nazi soldiers in war-torn Paris, to sheltering from the Blitz in Engl Perhaps there is no simple, easy way to educate children about the Holocaust. Yet a new extraordinary work in the form of a nonfiction graphic novel for children is a valiant attempt to do just that. Survivors of the Holocaust: True Stories of Six Extraordinary Children (Sourcebooks) tells the true stories of six Jewish children and young people who survived the Holocaust. From suffering the horrors of Auschwitz, to hiding from Nazi soldiers in war-torn Paris, to sheltering from the Blitz in England, each true story is a powerful testament to the survivors’ courage. These testimonials, from people still living today, in Leeds, England, serve as a reminder never to allow such a tragedy to happen again. Geared to children 10 years old and up, the book is based on the British Academy of Film and Television Arts-nominated animated documentaries, “Children of the Holocaust.” The artwork has been reinvented in this unique children’s graphic novel, which aims to bring the survivors’ stories to a new audience. The book was first published in the United Kingdom and just now is being released in the U.S. The book is edited by Kath Shackleton, producer and creator of “Children of the Holocaust,” and illustrated by Zane Whittingham, an animator for 26 years. Says Lilian Black, Chair, Holocaust Survivors’ Friendship Association, in the book’s foreword, “Each story you will read in this book is a true account of what happened to six young people over seventy years ago. Heinz, Trude, Ruth, Martin, Suzanne and Arek lived at home with their families. They went to school, enjoyed friendships, had hobbies and hopes for the future. Then one day their lives changed forever. They had done nothing wrong. They were born into Jewish families, and they were persecuted for this reason alone.” The rest of the review: https://booktrib.com/2019/09/teach-yo...

  15. 4 out of 5

    stefiereads

    I am always have my heart open to read more about WWII. That's why when i saw this book, I have to requested and I am so grateful that the publisher approved. So, thank you so much for this opportunity! :) Heartbreaking stories from the survivors of the Holocaust. GOSH! These people is so brave. Like very very brave. I just can't imagine what they've been through. I have read stories from other survivors before, but every time I read another one, then another one, I always ended up feeling so ove I am always have my heart open to read more about WWII. That's why when i saw this book, I have to requested and I am so grateful that the publisher approved. So, thank you so much for this opportunity! :) Heartbreaking stories from the survivors of the Holocaust. GOSH! These people is so brave. Like very very brave. I just can't imagine what they've been through. I have read stories from other survivors before, but every time I read another one, then another one, I always ended up feeling so overwhelmed and feeling like a mess. It's like reading something new, like the first time. This book did that to me too. These stories are written in a graphic novel format, short but packed with real emotions. The way that it is told, quite simple and easy to understand, but hit right to the point. And for me somehow, the simplicity of it, is what explain a lot (I hope this make sense). It's def a really hard read but it is an important one. What I like about this one is that this book is suitable to be read by children, even though I think it is also suitable for all age honestly. I highly recommended for librarians, teachers, parents, or anyone really to have at least a copy at their home. I think I will get one for myself as well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pam Page

    This graphic novel is written in a sensitive format for kids yet still shares the tragic stories of these six children. The actual photographs and "what happened" to the six children makes a big impact, along with the timeline. This can be a hard topic to write about for the suggested age group but Kath Shackleton balances the horror of the Holocaust with helping readers understand how kids lived through the time period. The foreword by Lilian Black was a great start to the story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ana Marlatt

    The power of graphic novels... where the worlds and the illustrations come together to give the reader a powerful message. You definitely see this come together in this book. Thank you to all the survivors who are brave enough to relive these horrific events and help us to #neverforget!

  18. 4 out of 5

    KC

    A difficult but yet compelling graphic novel that retells the account of 6 individuals who survived the Holocaust and the atrocities of WWII.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Torgusen

    Caught my attention while passing it at the library. Very interesting

  20. 4 out of 5

    Clark Draney

    Art Spiegelman's Maus entered my personal literary canon is grad school and has lodged there as a permanent fixture of my personal education and growth. When I began teaching literature at the college level, it quickly became a favorite of students in various classes both as a graphic novel of real power, and a Holocaust memorial that strips away the years for every generation of readers. Shackleton's book is a worthy companion to Maus. For readers mostly unfamiliar with the scope and depth of " Art Spiegelman's Maus entered my personal literary canon is grad school and has lodged there as a permanent fixture of my personal education and growth. When I began teaching literature at the college level, it quickly became a favorite of students in various classes both as a graphic novel of real power, and a Holocaust memorial that strips away the years for every generation of readers. Shackleton's book is a worthy companion to Maus. For readers mostly unfamiliar with the scope and depth of "The Final Solution" Maus is a useful but incomplete introduction to the great suffering experiences by many nations, not to mention millions of families and individuals. Either as an introduction to Holocaust studies or as a follow up to Maus, Survivors of the Holocaust can serve to point students (and others, of course) to the myriad stories available for a serious searcher. The brief vignettes are powerful, and different enough from each other to give a fully-fleshed view of the kinds of things survivors and their descendants have experienced. The art is beautiful and accessible. The text is appropriate for many kinds of readers, including middle-school age. School and public libraries will do well to acquire this text and make it a highlight of historical or "comics" literacy programs.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brittney Waterman

    A beautifully illustrated book about the most horrific thing in history. This book/graphic novel is an amazing way to teach kids about the horrifying and inspiring story of the Holocaust survivers. It is very intense, obviously, but it is excellent about getting the point across in a way children would be receptive to and begin to understand.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    This book is incredible. The fact it is nonfiction and a graphic novel -- and that the visuals are so well done with pertinent images throughout each panel -- makes is a great read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kiel

    Solid book for young readers (elementary), but a little more information could be added so that it’s still appropriate for younger audiences but also appeals to a slightly older one as well (middle grade).

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Very tough read, although important.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I received an ARC of this book from the publisher at ALA Annual 2019.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Dulaney

    It was with great excitement that I downloaded a digital ARC of this book from NetGalley as my library patrons avidly read everything that I can give them on the Holocaust and for “Survivors of the Holocaust” to be in graphic novel format made it all the more appealing to this librarian. I will not, however, be purchasing this one for either of my middle grades campuses. I gave one of my two stars for the back matter included in this title. The additional information/photos of the six survivors It was with great excitement that I downloaded a digital ARC of this book from NetGalley as my library patrons avidly read everything that I can give them on the Holocaust and for “Survivors of the Holocaust” to be in graphic novel format made it all the more appealing to this librarian. I will not, however, be purchasing this one for either of my middle grades campuses. I gave one of my two stars for the back matter included in this title. The additional information/photos of the six survivors and how they lived the later part of their lives, the timeline, and the glossary were excellent. The second star was assigned for the stark and sometimes too realistic illustrations. Truly the art conveyed the violence and evil of the Nazi regime, its horrific attacks on those deemed unworthy, and the horror of the prison camps. But this title is intended for ages 10 and up and several of the illustrations would likely cause great distress among teachers and parents of my students. Conversely, the text of Kath Shackleton’s book is, overall, very simplistic. My ARC had a section that read: “I loved Paris. It was a lovely life. It was a cultured life.” Adjectives, adverbs, prepositional phrases, compound and complex sentences were seldom used. My 10 and ups need higher quality text and randomly throwing in words like “rue” and “furtively,” especially with little context surrounding them, just isn’t enough. The six survivors of Hitler’s atrocities clearly had devastating experiences, but with the overly abbreviated and juvenile sounding narrative, their potentially powerful stories fell terribly short. Those looking for a more effective middle grades WWII graphic novel should look into Loic Dauvillier’s “Hidden.”

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tam I

    Read an ARC. Interesting way to depict the lives of these children.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I thought this was really well done from the stories of the individuals to the back matter with the glossary and timeline of events. The art is stark and dark and reminiscent of propaganda posters. It conveys the message perfectly. I also found the stories very compelling and inclusive of multiple experiences of surviving the horror of the Holocaust. They’re told in a more simplistic narrative, it feels like listening to someone for whom English isn’t their first language, which is certainly fit I thought this was really well done from the stories of the individuals to the back matter with the glossary and timeline of events. The art is stark and dark and reminiscent of propaganda posters. It conveys the message perfectly. I also found the stories very compelling and inclusive of multiple experiences of surviving the horror of the Holocaust. They’re told in a more simplistic narrative, it feels like listening to someone for whom English isn’t their first language, which is certainly fitting for this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Hillis

    These 6 stories of survival are heartbreaking, but written in a way that is easy for children to understand. It is important to keep teaching generations about the horrific history of the Holocaust, in hopes that history never repeats itself... I love the "What happened next?" section because you can connect to the characters even further. Thank you NetGalley for an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bex

    Presenting six tragic stories of the Holocaust through the memories of six people, then children, who experienced first hand has (to my knowledge) rarely, if ever, been done in the form of a graphic novel and I think it really works. Whilst the illustrations are particularly basic and could benefit from being less so in order to capture younger readers, the stories and the illustrated version of the children are really compelling. The book is divided into six sections, one for each child, and sh Presenting six tragic stories of the Holocaust through the memories of six people, then children, who experienced first hand has (to my knowledge) rarely, if ever, been done in the form of a graphic novel and I think it really works. Whilst the illustrations are particularly basic and could benefit from being less so in order to capture younger readers, the stories and the illustrated version of the children are really compelling. The book is divided into six sections, one for each child, and showcase the events starting with the Nuremberg Law in 1935 legalising anti-Jewish measures, Kristallnacht (the night of broken glass, various concentration camps including Dachau and Auschwitz-Birkenau, air raids in the Blitz and Mengele's cruelty. I was really impressed with the scale of this and what this novel achieves in fairly few words. Many of these terms may be unknown to younger readers, for whom I think this text is best intended, and for this reason the author has helpfully included a simplified glossary of terms to help familiarise or explain such terms. Equally there is a nice addition at the end of the book detailed what happened next to each of the children. The scale of the destruction is uncomfortable but important to share: 6 million people died during this time, but over one and a half MILLION of those people were children. The six voices speaking into the dark here, the six children featured in this story, are now adults who not only want their voices heard, their stories told but want texts like these to be popular choices on the shelves of schools to help educate a younger generation to learn from the mistakes of some of their predecessors. It's easy to think that something like this, of such a magnitude, would never happen again; books like this hopefully contribute to making that a reality. I love that the author has thought to put this into graphic novel form - it works, it's original and I think it will certainly resonate with young readers without causing too much distress or being too dense in the way that a heavier novel might do. ARC provided free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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