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And the Last Trump Shall Sound

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Set in the near future, And the Last Trump Shall Sound is prophetic warning about where we, as a nation, may be headed. A politically torn nation watches as the Republicans solidify their hold over the US with a series of electoral victories and judicial appointments. Mike Pence leads the country, succeeding Donald Trump as the flag-bearer of an increasingly dogmatic movem Set in the near future, And the Last Trump Shall Sound is prophetic warning about where we, as a nation, may be headed. A politically torn nation watches as the Republicans solidify their hold over the US with a series of electoral victories and judicial appointments. Mike Pence leads the country, succeeding Donald Trump as the flag-bearer of an increasingly dogmatic movement. There are parts of the country, however, that cannot abide by what they view as a betrayal of the nation's founding principles. At what point do these communities break down and the unthinkable suddenly becomes the only possible solution...the end of the Union. Harry Turtledove, James Morrow, and Cat Rambo give us three novellas, each following the other, describing the frightening possible consequences of our increased polarization--a dire warning to all of us about where we may be headed unless we can learn to come together again.


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Set in the near future, And the Last Trump Shall Sound is prophetic warning about where we, as a nation, may be headed. A politically torn nation watches as the Republicans solidify their hold over the US with a series of electoral victories and judicial appointments. Mike Pence leads the country, succeeding Donald Trump as the flag-bearer of an increasingly dogmatic movem Set in the near future, And the Last Trump Shall Sound is prophetic warning about where we, as a nation, may be headed. A politically torn nation watches as the Republicans solidify their hold over the US with a series of electoral victories and judicial appointments. Mike Pence leads the country, succeeding Donald Trump as the flag-bearer of an increasingly dogmatic movement. There are parts of the country, however, that cannot abide by what they view as a betrayal of the nation's founding principles. At what point do these communities break down and the unthinkable suddenly becomes the only possible solution...the end of the Union. Harry Turtledove, James Morrow, and Cat Rambo give us three novellas, each following the other, describing the frightening possible consequences of our increased polarization--a dire warning to all of us about where we may be headed unless we can learn to come together again.

30 review for And the Last Trump Shall Sound

  1. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence of The Breaking of Nations by Harry Turtledove: Nichole Yoshida clicked the remote's channel-up button, first once, then twice. First sentence of The Purloined Republic by James Morrow: Let's get the snickering over with right away. Yes, I was a porn star. First sentence of Because It Is Bitter by Cat Rambo: The electric bus was driverless, but you could see the shifting of the driver's wheel back and forth as it adjusted its course, as though someone invisible sat in the seat. Pr First sentence of The Breaking of Nations by Harry Turtledove: Nichole Yoshida clicked the remote's channel-up button, first once, then twice. First sentence of The Purloined Republic by James Morrow: Let's get the snickering over with right away. Yes, I was a porn star. First sentence of Because It Is Bitter by Cat Rambo: The electric bus was driverless, but you could see the shifting of the driver's wheel back and forth as it adjusted its course, as though someone invisible sat in the seat. Premise/plot: And The Last Trump Shall Sound is a collection of three novellas set in the 2030s. It is satire slash dystopia. Each story is rooted in the idea that Presidents Trump and Pence have ruined The United States of America beyond all hope of redemption--the only choice remains is for individual states to secede from the USA and form their own nations. In the first novella, California, Washington, and Oregon secede from the USA--not without threats and rants from President Pence--to form the new nation of Pacifica. (They are not the only states that will secede by the end of the collection, but they are the first three.) The point of view is that Pacifica encapsulates everything good and right and moral...according to a Leftist/Liberal point of view. And the USA encapsulates everything evil, repugnant, and disgusting. To be Southern, to be Christian, to be Conservative, to be Republican, well, you might as well not have a soul, not even be a human being. You are evil, evil, evil, evil, evil. Did you get the idea that you're EVIL. There are no nuances allowed in this satire/dystopia. You can't be a Christian and espouse Christian values and morals and ethics AND question the character and integrity of Trump/Pence. No, if you're a Christian then you are 100% team Republican all the way. Not only team Republican, but TEAM TRUMP AND TEAM PENCE. (As if Republicans aren't divided in some ways about these two). And it's not a good thing to be Christian in this one, no, it automatically makes you evil because you must breathe hate in and out all day long. Again no nuances allowed. Same thing with Southern states. To be born in the South is to automatically be a hater and all kinds of backward. I would assume there's also bias in being WHITE and or white and male and being evil. But by this point, just assume that if you're not well left of anything moderate and common sense then you are just EVIL. There are three stories in all. The first establishes the world that all three are set in. The first story is definitely the weakest--in my opinion. In the second novella, Polly Nightingale (former porn star) goes undercover for Pacifica and impersonates Reverend Walker Lambert, an advisor to President Pence. Her mission is to speak for the Lord (not really) and convince President Pence to do crazy, outlandish, ridiculous things that even the totally evil people who remain in the USA will find repugnant. Since they are so "warped" in their thinking, Pence's words and actions must be really, really, really, really really out there. Her visions from the Lord must be convincing enough to fool Pence. The climax of this one involves a "supernatural" resurrection of a certain somebody.... In the third novella, Ernst, a worker for GoogleSoft finds himself in a bit of a mess as he leaves the relative safety of Pacifica to venture into the United States pursuing a person who stole his life's work (a research project first started by his grandmother). My thoughts: I would not recommend this book for Christians, not because I believe--as the authors must???--that ALL Christians must by default be Trump/Pence supporters and be Team Republican until their dying breaths...and maybe even beyond. I would not recommend this book for Christians because it uses crude language, is condescending in its general tone and assumptions, and lacks the depth of being thought provoking. I'm fine completely with critiquing the system and offering political commentary. Political commentary isn't unwelcome--nor is satire, if it's good. Satire, in my opinion, should hold a kernel of truth with some mocking humor. The absolute best writers of satire are equal opportunists--they know that there is plenty worth poking on both sides: Republican and Democrat, Liberal and Conservative, Left and Right, etc. I can laugh at both sides most of the time. I'm not so team anything that I can't find humor in dark and dry places. The best dystopias have some subtlety thrown in. They draw you into the story in some delightfully creepy ways. Think Twilight Zone, for example. The created worlds can be bizarre, super bizarre, oppressive, weird, horrifying--combinations of all the above. But there is usually some subtlety. Think The Giver...one of the best in the genres. Or think 1984 or Fahrenheit 451. Again the best of the best of the best. This book lacks any hint of subtlety. I would say it would be like applying lipstick with a paintbrush. A smaller brush would do a better job. This book isn't great at being satire or great at being a dystopia. I will say this....the third story is the best of the three. I would actually rate the third story by itself as closer to four stars. The other two stories--I'm being generous with one and two stars respectively. If all three stories were as clever and as well written as the third story, I would give the book a higher rating. The book felt lazy to me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Schwander

    Put this on the NEVER TO READ list. Just looking at the title and cover, you can tell it's a political hit piece. Just disgusting!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Randal White

    Meh. A set of three novellas, each one building on the previous. The first story, by Turtledove, imagines that the Trump era gets so bad that the Pacific Northwest secedes from the United States, and becomes it's own country. Honestly, this scenario is not so far fetched. I live in Washington. There has been talk of forming a new country, called Cascadia. For years. They even have a flag for the new country! I was wondering when someone was going to get around to writing this scenario into a book Meh. A set of three novellas, each one building on the previous. The first story, by Turtledove, imagines that the Trump era gets so bad that the Pacific Northwest secedes from the United States, and becomes it's own country. Honestly, this scenario is not so far fetched. I live in Washington. There has been talk of forming a new country, called Cascadia. For years. They even have a flag for the new country! I was wondering when someone was going to get around to writing this scenario into a book. Enter Turtledove. Honestly, it's the area where he is at his best. He's explored the topic before, with the Civil War, and with his World War series. I enjoy his imagination. So, here he's written a good, engaging story. It kept me guessing, right up to the ending. You do have to deal with his somewhat "folksy" dialogues, he never has grown past the "he said, then she said, then he said" descriptions. All in language that seems from the 40's or 50's. But it's okay, if you accept that's just him. The other two stories build on the first. Each gets a little more "out there". I didn't really enjoy either one. I would have rather let Turtledove build on his scenario. Mildly entertaining.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Grady

    A highly polished ‘What If’ look into the future of the US (gulp!) Pennsylvania author James Morrow (‘outrageous and eccentric’), California author Harry Turtledove (prolific and highly awarded) and Washington author Cat Rambo (polished fantasy and fiction) lock thoughts in this anthology of three novellas, one by each of the named authors. The theme – a ‘what if’ dark future of the United States: the possible consequences of the Trump impact on current and future history. As the country shudders A highly polished ‘What If’ look into the future of the US (gulp!) Pennsylvania author James Morrow (‘outrageous and eccentric’), California author Harry Turtledove (prolific and highly awarded) and Washington author Cat Rambo (polished fantasy and fiction) lock thoughts in this anthology of three novellas, one by each of the named authors. The theme – a ‘what if’ dark future of the United States: the possible consequences of the Trump impact on current and future history. As the country shudders from the constant rhetoric, media blitzes, television snapshot moments, Twitter et al social media posts, and every other kind of information dissemination as the 2020 election battleground nears, up pops AND THE LAST TRUMP SHALL SOUND, and the authors speculate on just what may lay ahead. It is at once frightening, and also a masterfully conceived and entertaining conglomerate of ideas that deserve heeding. Very wisely the authors open with a statement of intent: ‘This is a political satire, and meant to be a parody on how events might look in the future. Although certain political figures are used as characters in these stories, there is no attempt to prove or even imply that the future events depicted in these stories represent actual events related to any of these individuals. As a parody/satire with occasional over-the-top elements some readers may find certain portions of these stories caustic. But the reader is reminded that this is a satire and neither the authors or the publisher purport that any of this is either true or likely to happen, or a true representation of the characters.’ With that ‘safety net’ the book opens to one of the more controversial (or prescient!) speculations (prophecies!) presented to the reading public to date. The stories include ate Harry Turtledove’s “The Breaking of Nations,’ James Morrow’s ‘The Purloined Republic,’ and Cat Rambo’s “Because it is Bitter.’ The postulate: Trump wins the 2020 Presidential election, extending the growth of his divisive behavior and control of the country, dies, is replaced by VP Pence as a leader not much better than his predecessor, and the current symptoms of a crumbling democracy become a full-fledged disease. A sample of the content is present in Turtledove’s opening lines: ‘Nicole Yoshida clicked the remote’s channel-up button, first once, then twice. The same story led on Fox news, Fox-CNN, and Fox-MSNBC. At President Pence’s order, the governor and lieutenant governor of Connecticut had been remanded to protective custody on a charge of treason for refusing to cooperate with federal court-mandated immigration sweeps…’ Sound a bit familiar? Read on, because while this book is a satire/parody, the ideas (when view as reflections of our ‘now’) are very tenable. This is brilliant satire, and as with ancient court jesters, we should think while we laugh.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Annalisa

    This is definitely one of his better books. I love the alternate histories. This one gives off sort of a cautionary vibe. I really enjoyed this book. I definitely recommend it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Debbi Smith

    Received from #Netgalley This book can really make you think. Even as a political parody it hits too close to home for comfort. I don't care if you lean red or blue, you should read this awesome book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    Thanks to Netgalley for an ARC of this book, in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is a series of 3 sequential novellas. The first, by Harry Turtledove, deals with the secession of California, Oregon, and Washington State, to form the new nation of Pacifica. It really is a near term alternative history, maybe 15 years along, after Trump and then Pence have solidified total authoritarian control over the US. A cautionary tale, really, as nothing about it seemed to be terribly far fetched, Thanks to Netgalley for an ARC of this book, in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is a series of 3 sequential novellas. The first, by Harry Turtledove, deals with the secession of California, Oregon, and Washington State, to form the new nation of Pacifica. It really is a near term alternative history, maybe 15 years along, after Trump and then Pence have solidified total authoritarian control over the US. A cautionary tale, really, as nothing about it seemed to be terribly far fetched, if things continue as they have been. This was my favorite of the three, not because I liked what happened, but because it was very well written and sadly plausible. The second, by James Morrow, continues a bit farther along in time, with efforts by Pacifica to undermine the Pence administration. Somewhat fun, but it just didn't hold my attention as much as Turtledove's story. I think, perhaps, because it just seemed way too nonsensical. Things were thrown in, like the unexpected presence of the main character's daughter at one of the events, but then didn't really seem to have much point to them, nor did they have any real influence on the plot. The third, by Cat Rambo, was again a little further along in time. There were interesting touches - the protagonist worked for Googlesoft, after Google and Microsoft merged, but overall, it didn't seem to really advance the overall plot. The story here could happen anywhere/any time, and while there were details like the difficulty in crossing the border and the hostility of the US toward Pacifica citizens, those were just background. In short, as the three novellas proceeded in time, they also became less involved in the basic premise, and I found them less interesting as they went along. It's a fast read, and certainly enjoyable, but I have to average out the book at a 3.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    Sadly, I'm going to be taking a DNF on this one as I simply couldn't connect on any level. The premise sounded nice but this was just not what I was expecting. Thank you to Harry, the pub, Netgalley, and Amazon Kindle for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    The Review This was a marvelous, eye-opening, and engaging mixture of historical fiction/dystopian future novels with a “what if…” twist. The narratives each author brought to life capture the raw emotion and power that this world’s division has created in recent years, and showcases how the world and in particular the United States could look like if events continue to unfold the way they are. From a future that sees the West Coast states seceding from the Union to the leader of the free world t The Review This was a marvelous, eye-opening, and engaging mixture of historical fiction/dystopian future novels with a “what if…” twist. The narratives each author brought to life capture the raw emotion and power that this world’s division has created in recent years, and showcases how the world and in particular the United States could look like if events continue to unfold the way they are. From a future that sees the West Coast states seceding from the Union to the leader of the free world turning portions of the United States into a religious-run state and the “resurrection” of the man who started it all, these author present ideas and futures which could prove to be our future. The way the authors write captures the emotion of our nation as it stands now: confusion, frustration, anger, and sadness all extend over us all right now. The Verdict Fast-paced, engaging, and detail-oriented in its delivery, the authors give readers a marvelous yet haunting look into what the United States could become. In the face of racial tension, immigration horrors, pandemics and so much more, the American Empire as it stands could look drastically different in just a couple of decades. Utilizing real political and historical figures into a well-developed fictional political satire, these authors have delivered a memorable novel that cannot be missed. Be sure to grab your copy today!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Book Reviewer

    In the not-too-distant future, Mike Pence has ascended the ladder to the presidency, but the foundation that was laid during Donald Trump’s time in office still stands strong. The United States has become little more than a caricature of its former self as its people grow more and more extreme about almost literally every issue imaginable. Finally reaching a breaking point, the west coast declares its independence and comes Pacifica, prompting the northeast to consider following suit. As both na In the not-too-distant future, Mike Pence has ascended the ladder to the presidency, but the foundation that was laid during Donald Trump’s time in office still stands strong. The United States has become little more than a caricature of its former self as its people grow more and more extreme about almost literally every issue imaginable. Finally reaching a breaking point, the west coast declares its independence and comes Pacifica, prompting the northeast to consider following suit. As both nations adjust to the change, the stories that emerge range from terrifyingly feasible to laugh out loud absurd, with just a little of the bizarre thrown in for color. And the Last Trump Shall Sound is a trilogy of novellas that explore a different aspect of the future of Trump’s America in the wake of Pacifica’s succession. Each entry is penned by a different author and as such, projects a drastically different voice. Although each story is connected and follows a linear timeline, using different authors helps to keep it fresh. “The Breaking of Nations” by Harry Turtledove illustrates the first days of Pacifica and the struggles faced by its leaders. Of the three, this one is easily the most frightening for its plausibility and passages that read more like non-fiction at times. Turtledove paints the picture of a future devoid of any semblance of morality or democracy and the people who want desperately to salvage what they can. In contrast, “The Purloined Republic”, by James Morrow takes a more absurd approach to solidifying Pacifica’s status as an independent nation, a couple of years down the road. Taking a page out of classic spy and espionage novels, Morrow’s tone is much more tongue in cheek as our heroine Polly agrees to go undercover in the hopes of undermining Pence’s legitimacy, even among the most devoted Americans. What follows is a series of events that can only be described as both ridiculous and wildly entertaining. The final entry is “Because it is Bitter” by Cat Rambo, and this one gets weird. Set six years after the formation of Pacifica, it veers firmly into science fiction territory, and stops just short of portraying life in America as dystopian. It combines the implications of Trump’s future with a complete lack of privacy that raises plenty of questions about freedom and manipulation. It provides a fitting end to the trilogy as it leaves the door open for both hope and uncertainty. For me, the opening story was the weakest of the three and made getting into the book a little slow, but it was nonetheless well written and a necessary read for the other two to make sense. I thoroughly enjoyed the differences in style and tone, and would love to read more from these writers in the future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Three short stories by three different authors, but all sharing the same universe, that is the charm and the problem of And The Last Trump Shall Sound. Harry Turtledove does a very nice job of laying the groundwork for the breakup of the US of A. The readers quickly realizes that this is near time future AH. the technology is recognizable and the situation is relatable. The story resolution is plausible. James Morrow then chimes in with an over the top espionage tale that takes the situation Tur Three short stories by three different authors, but all sharing the same universe, that is the charm and the problem of And The Last Trump Shall Sound. Harry Turtledove does a very nice job of laying the groundwork for the breakup of the US of A. The readers quickly realizes that this is near time future AH. the technology is recognizable and the situation is relatable. The story resolution is plausible. James Morrow then chimes in with an over the top espionage tale that takes the situation Turtledove laid out and builds on the wackiness inherent in the system. A spy impersonates an advisor of the president of the United States to try and destroy him, but the law of unintended consequences intervenes and the results are very strange. The third tale by Cat Rambo is more dystopian and rambling then the first two. This reader had a harder time getting to the story and carrying for the characters. And the ending just goes off into the sunset. So just beware that not all the tales are equal, but most are reasonably entertaining. Thanks Netgalley for the opportunity to read this title.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Frank Hofer

    Believable Three authors each write a story about the fascist takeover of the US, giving us the story of a secession of the pacific states from the rest of the country. The Breaking of Nations by Harry Turtledove is by far the strongest story in book. It details the exit of California, Oregon, and Washington from the US to form their own nation. It was a gripping story and every time I thought I found a hole in the logic it got addressed. This story alone is worth the price of the book and I hope Believable Three authors each write a story about the fascist takeover of the US, giving us the story of a secession of the pacific states from the rest of the country. The Breaking of Nations by Harry Turtledove is by far the strongest story in book. It details the exit of California, Oregon, and Washington from the US to form their own nation. It was a gripping story and every time I thought I found a hole in the logic it got addressed. This story alone is worth the price of the book and I hope to see more stories from Turtledove set in this universe. The Purloined Republic by James Morrow was a solid offering if a bit silly. It’s essentially a spy story where an ex porn actress replaces Mike Pence’s spiritual adviser and feeds him religious visions that have him enacting bizarre policy decisions. I felt the depiction of Pence was far too sympathetic and didn’t reflect how evil the man really is. Because It Is Bitter by Cat Rambo was the weakest story in the bunch. It was also somewhat of a spy story with a twist, focusing on life in both the new US and to a lesser extent the breakaway states. To me the story kind of rambled and I didn’t really have much of a point and a not very satisfying resolution.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jim Strasma

    Having enjoyed another of Harry Turtledove's books, I figured this would be witty exploration of where we as a nation are headed in the Trump years. Sadly, it's just every bad thing any political enemy has ever said about President Trump and Mike Pence and the deplorable people of flyover country repeated as though Gospel truth, with no wit in evidence at all. It reminded me of discussions I used to have with a Palestinian friend about current events in the Middle East. No matter what event we t Having enjoyed another of Harry Turtledove's books, I figured this would be witty exploration of where we as a nation are headed in the Trump years. Sadly, it's just every bad thing any political enemy has ever said about President Trump and Mike Pence and the deplorable people of flyover country repeated as though Gospel truth, with no wit in evidence at all. It reminded me of discussions I used to have with a Palestinian friend about current events in the Middle East. No matter what event we talked about, it soon became evident we had no truth sources in common, and needn't have bothered trying to talk. Fortunately, Amazon allows Kindle books to be returned for refund for a week after purchase, and for only the second time ever, I did so with this book, unwilling to bless such garbage with even a penny of profit.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Art

    Okay, so I am not a fan of the impeached WH occupant. That being said, I was probably the target audience for this book. And it hit the target. One of the things I liked about it was that it did not portray the new nation of Pacifica as a utopian paradise of liberal values. It still had problems and was far from perfect. I don't expect any one view of politics (even my own) to provide all the answers and be a panacea for all current societal problems. There was a good amount of sardonic humor he Okay, so I am not a fan of the impeached WH occupant. That being said, I was probably the target audience for this book. And it hit the target. One of the things I liked about it was that it did not portray the new nation of Pacifica as a utopian paradise of liberal values. It still had problems and was far from perfect. I don't expect any one view of politics (even my own) to provide all the answers and be a panacea for all current societal problems. There was a good amount of sardonic humor here. More in the first two stories. Some of it seems to be gallows humor. If you are a fan of 45, you probably won't like this book. But if you are not, or you are on the fence, then you may want to give this a go.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Sells

    Eerie... This trio of stories is set up so slickly that you don't realize what you're reading until deep into the second story. Harry Turtledove, as usual, does a masterful job ... but this time his "alternate" history is straining to be fantastical. Its not his fault that reality is stranger than fiction these days. He may have simply written fact this time. The second story is equally good, if a bit more dark in its depictions. The third story messed with my head...plain and simple. The twists Eerie... This trio of stories is set up so slickly that you don't realize what you're reading until deep into the second story. Harry Turtledove, as usual, does a masterful job ... but this time his "alternate" history is straining to be fantastical. Its not his fault that reality is stranger than fiction these days. He may have simply written fact this time. The second story is equally good, if a bit more dark in its depictions. The third story messed with my head...plain and simple. The twists and turns it takes are terrifying. The storyline is as disarming as it gets ...until it drops you off of one cliff after another. Gotta say...I loved it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven Benedetti

    Love Turtle dove’ salt histories and this could be a slightly prejudiced vision of our future. Being a Never Trumper, I was hoping for a refund open discussion of the positives and negatives of our situation and possible demise as a democracy and republic. Turtledove put it out there to a certain extent, but I could not connect with the other two installments. Definitely not my favorite.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Clare Rhoden

    A very clever satire on Trumpian policies that is sure to be divisive in that divided land. As an outsider, I found its reflections on what is 'the real America' quite interesting. It's perhaps not as amusing as satire can be, but well written enough that a longer novel from each story would be worth reading.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Doxiadis

    The Future You Do Not want Anchored in today’s Trumpist world and then expanded upon, the realities created are masterfully written. I so do hope these images of the future do not become real life.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's three short stories that intertwine, yes its very political book if ,you like the current president yes you will dislike it. The first story is kind of scary as to being semi realistic and to some degree some possibilities of happening. The last two are dark humour are enjoyable

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bill Navolis

    A good satire.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jon Adams

    This is scary because all of it seems like it could happen. Well done.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jim Rittenhouse

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ian Fowler

  24. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ken Weinert

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dave Morehous

  28. 4 out of 5

    sam flores

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lana

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jay

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