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In 1853, Abigail Scott was a 19-year-old school teacher in Oregon Territory when she married Ben Duniway. Marriage meant giving up on teaching, but Abigail always believed she was meant to be more than a good wife and mother. When financial mistakes and an injury force Ben to stop working, Abigail becomes the primary breadwinner for her growing family. What she sees as a w In 1853, Abigail Scott was a 19-year-old school teacher in Oregon Territory when she married Ben Duniway. Marriage meant giving up on teaching, but Abigail always believed she was meant to be more than a good wife and mother. When financial mistakes and an injury force Ben to stop working, Abigail becomes the primary breadwinner for her growing family. What she sees as a working woman appalls her, and she devotes her life to fighting for the rights of women, including their right to vote. Following Abigail as she bears six children, runs a millinery and a private school, helps on the farm, writes novels, gives speeches, and eventually runs a newspaper supporting women's suffrage, Something Worth Doing explores issues that will resonate strongly with modern women: the pull between career and family, finding one's place in the public sphere, and dealing with frustrations and prejudices women encounter when they compete in male-dominated spaces. Based on a true story of a pioneer for women's rights from award-winning author Jane Kirkpatrick will inspire you to believe that some things are worth doing--even when the cost is great.


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In 1853, Abigail Scott was a 19-year-old school teacher in Oregon Territory when she married Ben Duniway. Marriage meant giving up on teaching, but Abigail always believed she was meant to be more than a good wife and mother. When financial mistakes and an injury force Ben to stop working, Abigail becomes the primary breadwinner for her growing family. What she sees as a w In 1853, Abigail Scott was a 19-year-old school teacher in Oregon Territory when she married Ben Duniway. Marriage meant giving up on teaching, but Abigail always believed she was meant to be more than a good wife and mother. When financial mistakes and an injury force Ben to stop working, Abigail becomes the primary breadwinner for her growing family. What she sees as a working woman appalls her, and she devotes her life to fighting for the rights of women, including their right to vote. Following Abigail as she bears six children, runs a millinery and a private school, helps on the farm, writes novels, gives speeches, and eventually runs a newspaper supporting women's suffrage, Something Worth Doing explores issues that will resonate strongly with modern women: the pull between career and family, finding one's place in the public sphere, and dealing with frustrations and prejudices women encounter when they compete in male-dominated spaces. Based on a true story of a pioneer for women's rights from award-winning author Jane Kirkpatrick will inspire you to believe that some things are worth doing--even when the cost is great.

30 review for Something Worth Doing

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    *Something Worth Doing by Jane Kirkpatrick is a 2020 Revell publication. It is not the certainty that something will turn out well, but the certainty that something is worth doing regardless of how it turns out. This is a fascinating fictional account of the life of Abigail Scott Duniway, a journalist and prolific author and early suffragist who worked tirelessly to help women in Oregon gain the right to vote. I am so glad the author chose Abigail as her subject. I think it’s important not only *Something Worth Doing by Jane Kirkpatrick is a 2020 Revell publication. It is not the certainty that something will turn out well, but the certainty that something is worth doing regardless of how it turns out. This is a fascinating fictional account of the life of Abigail Scott Duniway, a journalist and prolific author and early suffragist who worked tirelessly to help women in Oregon gain the right to vote. I am so glad the author chose Abigail as her subject. I think it’s important not only to remember these important figures in history, but to also educate younger generations who may have little knowledge of the hardships women endured and how difficult their battles for equality were in a time when women simply melted into the background, to become mere extensions of their husbands. Women were to be ‘protected’ from any talk of business or politics, and wives had little, if any, input in the family decision making. Abigail was known in nonfictional accountings as being ‘strident’ at times. She didn’t agree with some proposed legislations that bound suffragist to prohibition, and she struggled in her approach, at times, which cost her dearly, and slowed down the progression of the movement. But this story allows the reader to contemplate a softer side of Abigail and gives us insight into the situations that prompted her to become a fierce crusader for the women’s right to vote. With the death of RBG this past week, and reading of how this author was once denied a library card unless her husband signed for her to have one – back in 1968- I find myself feeling grateful for the sacrifices women like Abigail made for future generations- and for all those who followed in her footsteps. Where would we be without them? It’s easy to take for granted the many rights and privileges we have today, especially for younger women who never knew a different environment. While there are still many, many, many hurdles still in our way, I hope we can take inspiration from Abigail. She was a woman who experienced many hardships and trials, much loss, and heartbreak, but even in her moments of doubt, when her spirit was broken and she felt defeated, she never lost her faith, and despite huge setbacks, she continued to fight the good fight until Oregon women finally won the right the vote. In every generation we need these strong willed, focused, and dedicated figures to guide us through the tunnels of darkness, letting their bright lights illuminate the way so that others will not suffer the same adversity, so that future generations will have the richer and fuller lives they deserve! The best way to honor these trailblazers is to register to vote and make your voice heard!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    Historical fiction is my favorite genre to read and one of my favorite authors who writes this genre is Jane Kirkpatrick. I have read many of her books over the years and many like this one are based on real people and circumstances. Abigail Scott Duniway was a true pioneer woman, she puts all her time and effort into women's suffrage movement at the expense of her husband and children. At one point she didn't see her children or husband for ten months and she really didn't seem to mind. While I d Historical fiction is my favorite genre to read and one of my favorite authors who writes this genre is Jane Kirkpatrick. I have read many of her books over the years and many like this one are based on real people and circumstances. Abigail Scott Duniway was a true pioneer woman, she puts all her time and effort into women's suffrage movement at the expense of her husband and children. At one point she didn't see her children or husband for ten months and she really didn't seem to mind. While I do admire her efforts into woman's rights movements and her contribution to the betterment of women I could not make a connection with her character. I have always enjoyed this authors work and the historical facts presented in her books I just couldn't make a connection with the characters in this book. Pub Date 01 Sep 2020 This book was provided by Baker Publishing Group, Revell Division, through Interviews & Reviews.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Timerman

    The wisdom of a mother that is passed down to a daughter that in the end, benefits all of the woman of this country. We need to be grateful for the sacrifices woman like Abigail Scott, and other's who fought throughout their lives for woman's rights, including the right to vote. We follow Abigail from her first year of teaching until the end of her life, through life's tribulations of joy and sorrow. God put a wonderful man named Ben in her path, and we journey with them as they survive in the new The wisdom of a mother that is passed down to a daughter that in the end, benefits all of the woman of this country. We need to be grateful for the sacrifices woman like Abigail Scott, and other's who fought throughout their lives for woman's rights, including the right to vote. We follow Abigail from her first year of teaching until the end of her life, through life's tribulations of joy and sorrow. God put a wonderful man named Ben in her path, and we journey with them as they survive in the newly established Oregon, through the birth of their children, and with Abigail and her activism, with their extended family and friends. A book of history, in a way, but also the backbone of what makes this country so special. You will be page turning, and we know the outcome, but how the war was fought we are along for the ride. I received this book through LibraryThing and the Publisher Revell. and was not required to give a positive review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jypsy

    Thank you Revell for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. Something Worth Doing By: Jane Kirkpatrick REVIEW ☆☆☆ I have to mention the gorgeous cover art. It's stunning! Something Worth Doing is a story I liked and disliked. I like Jane Kirkpatrick's work. Her research is evident in the historical details and facts of the story, and she writes so beautifully. My dislike is of the character of Abigail. She read as selfish and indifferent toward Thank you Revell for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. Something Worth Doing By: Jane Kirkpatrick REVIEW ☆☆☆ I have to mention the gorgeous cover art. It's stunning! Something Worth Doing is a story I liked and disliked. I like Jane Kirkpatrick's work. Her research is evident in the historical details and facts of the story, and she writes so beautifully. My dislike is of the character of Abigail. She read as selfish and indifferent toward her children, and this bothered me. I know she fought for something important and valuable, but I have an unpopular opinion about this. I think women can't always have it all, and I'm okay with that. I could not tune in to Abigail's mindset, so I had no connection with her. This is just a personal preference of opinion, and I am certain this story will resonate with scores of readers.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kailey

    I’m not sure how I felt about this book. It was interesting since it was about a real woman, but there were some things that I didn’t like. I liked how Abigail stood up for women. I didn’t like how whiny she came across as. I felt bad for her husband and children though. It seemed like the only thing that mattered to her was the cause for women. Overall, it was a okay read. I received a complimentary copy from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed ar I’m not sure how I felt about this book. It was interesting since it was about a real woman, but there were some things that I didn’t like. I liked how Abigail stood up for women. I didn’t like how whiny she came across as. I felt bad for her husband and children though. It seemed like the only thing that mattered to her was the cause for women. Overall, it was a okay read. I received a complimentary copy from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are mine alone.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Libby May

    I haven't really had great success with Jane Kirkpatrick's writing style yet. The last book I read by her was All She Left Behind. I will admit I liked that story, but the main thread was girls, ladies, women, females. MAKE A PLACE FOR YOURSELF IN THE WORLD OF MEN. I'll say for myself that I am a pretty bold person and I believe in making a place for yourself in the world, however after reading Something Worth Doing, the amount of feminism that's portrayed in these books is just too much for me. I haven't really had great success with Jane Kirkpatrick's writing style yet. The last book I read by her was All She Left Behind. I will admit I liked that story, but the main thread was girls, ladies, women, females. MAKE A PLACE FOR YOURSELF IN THE WORLD OF MEN. I'll say for myself that I am a pretty bold person and I believe in making a place for yourself in the world, however after reading Something Worth Doing, the amount of feminism that's portrayed in these books is just too much for me. I just don't agree with the way that the ladies handled their lives, their careers, their desires. I don't like the way this main character, Jenny, (yes I'm still calling her Jenny for now) was so "dominant" over her husband, and as a meek little thing he agreed with her. Again, disclaimer. I'm not done with the book yet. We'll see how this goes. The plot itself is pretty fast paced. It goes from independent Jenny falling head over heels, love at first sight with heart flutters for Ben. Hesitating to marry because of her independence but after a time she must marry. So then she becomes and wife and has kids and they have the same struggles other frontier families usually have (thinking Laura Ingles and the First Four Years) then she write a poem, and it gets accepted into the newspaper and her husband says he doesn't mind her writing, so they she starts writing what's called "The Farmer's Wife." Which I didn't really like all that much once she started voicing more and more controversy. Now girls, I appreciate the freedoms and privileges that we have as ladies in our day and age. I just don't like this book and the way that this particular character acts out to get it. I guess suffrage is just not my preferred genre. At this point I will give it a three star rating and recommend to girls 14 and up who enjoy historical fiction in a suffrage setting. Thank you to Revell for the complimentary copy of this book! A positive review was not required and all opinions were my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Less than two-hundred years ago, a woman was subject to the whims of her father, brother, or husband. A woman could keep no income she made for herself alone, should her husband choose to take her money. A man could take all of his wife's property and their child, with no consequence through the law. All of this was commonplace in the same country where wars were fought to secure the freedom of some, but not all. We are taught these things in school, but it never really hit home for me until I r Less than two-hundred years ago, a woman was subject to the whims of her father, brother, or husband. A woman could keep no income she made for herself alone, should her husband choose to take her money. A man could take all of his wife's property and their child, with no consequence through the law. All of this was commonplace in the same country where wars were fought to secure the freedom of some, but not all. We are taught these things in school, but it never really hit home for me until I read Jane Kirkpatrick's historical fiction, Something Worth Doing. I've always been drawn to stories of America's Pioneer days and those families who crossed the wilderness in wagons in search of a better life. Often, at great cost. This same drive is what leads Abigail "Jenny" Scott's family from their family in Illinois for a new life in Oregon Territory. Jenny Scott's mother dies on the Oregon Trail before our story begins, yet it's her mother's life and death which impacts the young teen in far-reaching ways. Jenny can't help but see the lack of choice her mother had in their new life and determines to seek better for herself. Despite her frustrations with the men in her life, Jenny falls in love with a good man who loves and sees her as his equal. In a romance novel, this might be the end of the story, a wonderful beginning to a happy marriage. But this isn't the end of Jenny's story, just as marriage isn't the end of a woman's journey. Life is shaped by marks in the road, like marriage and childbirth, trials and heartache. Until eventually, Jenny Scott puts aside her youthful nickname and sets on her personal journey to discover "Abigail." Abigail Scott Duniway is not easy to get along with. She speaks her mind and doesn't believe in backing down, no matter how frightened or doubtful she may become. Abigail takes all the lessons learned in hers, her sisters' and mother's lives, and slowly shares her thoughts with a broader audience. Along her path to finding her voice, Abigail finds herself championing women's right to vote and basic liberties. She's gifted by support through a husband who adores her, and sisters who lift her up. Yet the more Abigail seeks to protect her investments and champion the cause of others, the less time she gives back to her family. I both loved and despised Abigail. On the one hand, her courage and determination to push for change make her admirable. Yet as Kirkpatrick takes us through the decades of "Jenny" and Ben's marriage, I couldn't help but want to reach through the pages to tell our heroine to not turn away from the abundant love in her life. Having lost a mother and siblings at an early age, it's understandable that she hardens her heart. But the worst of it all is Abigail is fully aware as she deprives herself of many simple joys. As much as I came to dislike the main character, I couldn't help but be drawn deeper into the story and lives of characters who truly lived and breathed. Historical fiction, when penned by a gifted author, has the ability to transport us into the past. But when a novel is meticulously researched and based upon a historical figure, the past comes far more vividly to life. This is what New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick has gifted us with Something Worth Doing. A jump into the yesterday, yes, but also a mirror to hold to ourselves today. We are not so far removed from a time when women were granted few personal freedoms. We live on the backs of all who suffered, and struggled, and sacrificed. It's a lesson I won't soon forget. We are shaped by all that has come before, and all we endure today. As Kirkpatrick quotes, "It's not the certainty that something will turn out well but the certainty that something is worth doing regardless of how it turns out."  **I was provided with a copy of Something Worth Doing by the publisher and this is my voluntary and honest review.**

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 2 STARS 2020; Revell Books Let's take a minute and enjoy the prettiness of this cover! The colour scheme draws you, and gives off the "this is a historical fiction" novel. The tagline on the cover describing Something Worth Doing as a novel about " early suffragist" really tugged at my interest. This book took me a long time to get through as I had a difficult time picking the novel back up. The slow pace, and the characteristics of Abigail Scott Duniway really made me want to pass on this RATING: 2 STARS 2020; Revell Books Let's take a minute and enjoy the prettiness of this cover! The colour scheme draws you, and gives off the "this is a historical fiction" novel. The tagline on the cover describing Something Worth Doing as a novel about " early suffragist" really tugged at my interest. This book took me a long time to get through as I had a difficult time picking the novel back up. The slow pace, and the characteristics of Abigail Scott Duniway really made me want to pass on this book. I found that the summary on Wikipedia to be more interesting, and has inspired me to look into one of Duniway's own writing. I am not sure if it is Abigail herself, that drags the novel down, so I am looking forward to reading One More River to Cross. ***I received a complimentary copy of this ebook from the publisher through NetGalley and a paperback. Opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.***

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

    Normally, I really enjoy whatever Jane Kirkpatrick writes but this wasn't one that I really resonated with. Part of it was the main character really grated on me, and some of the choices she made didn't work for me, but it was well written and well researched as all of Ms. Kirkpatrick's novels usually are. 2.5 Stars Normally, I really enjoy whatever Jane Kirkpatrick writes but this wasn't one that I really resonated with. Part of it was the main character really grated on me, and some of the choices she made didn't work for me, but it was well written and well researched as all of Ms. Kirkpatrick's novels usually are. 2.5 Stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I love historical fiction and this book was no exception. I enjoy learning things and I have never heard of Abigail Scott Dunaway either. What a fascinating woman! I admired her a lot! I loved her representation of women yesterday and today. Sometimes her thoughts were exactly what I think of sometimes when men do things that upsets us sometimes. I won't say what that is but I'm sure you can pretty much figure it out. Kirkpatrick has a wonderful voice in historical fiction. The stories that she I love historical fiction and this book was no exception. I enjoy learning things and I have never heard of Abigail Scott Dunaway either. What a fascinating woman! I admired her a lot! I loved her representation of women yesterday and today. Sometimes her thoughts were exactly what I think of sometimes when men do things that upsets us sometimes. I won't say what that is but I'm sure you can pretty much figure it out. Kirkpatrick has a wonderful voice in historical fiction. The stories that she creates are out of this world! I love imaging myself in her stories and being that certain character that is written about. Her descriptions of the scenery is beautiful! I love picturing them in my mind and "seeing " the scenery as Abigail must of seen it. I found myself wanting more after I finished this wonderful book. I didn't want to say goodbye to Abigail and her friends. I highly recommend this book. I was NOT required to write a positive review for this book. All opinions are my own. This book definitely deserves more than 5 stars!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    I had a hard time with this book because I couldn’t really relate. I realize that fighting for women to be able to own things, get custody of their children, and so many other things was needed. However, Abigail seemed selfish, and she went ten months ( apparently fairly easily) without seeing her husband or children. The author didn’t make me feel connected to any characters in this book. I don’t know if that had more to do with the main character or the writing itself. I did learn much from rea I had a hard time with this book because I couldn’t really relate. I realize that fighting for women to be able to own things, get custody of their children, and so many other things was needed. However, Abigail seemed selfish, and she went ten months ( apparently fairly easily) without seeing her husband or children. The author didn’t make me feel connected to any characters in this book. I don’t know if that had more to do with the main character or the writing itself. I did learn much from reading this book. The author did some extensive research to try to bring Abigail Duniway to life. Much is said of her relationships and the complexity of her situation with her brother as they both ran a newspaper with opposing views. There is a lot of information in the book about how the women’s right to vote was tied to prohibition, which i had never heard before. The west also was different from the East so they sought women’s rights differently than the East. I personally love housework, Abigail hated it and really didn’t even seem to like the tasks of being a mother. Considering I was not even able to give birth, I found her a bit whiny and petty. I think in this instance, it was more the character that was brought to life than the writing that didn’t appeal. I have always enjoyed this authors books. I did very much enjoy the historical research , but I didn’t connect with the people. If you are interested in history, how difficult it was for pioneers of Oregon and the west, or the fight of women’s rights ( this was far more than just the right to vote) I would definitely recommend this book. I received this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Connie Saunders

    I find it very fitting that this book was published during the 100th year anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment and I applaud author Jane Kirkpatrick for reminding us just how difficult the passage of this amendment truly was. One of the women who worked so vehemently is someone I'd never heard of and I found Abigail Scott's life story to be a remarkable journey of determination, persistence, and finally, success. Her life wasn't easy and she endured many heartaches and backsets I find it very fitting that this book was published during the 100th year anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment and I applaud author Jane Kirkpatrick for reminding us just how difficult the passage of this amendment truly was. One of the women who worked so vehemently is someone I'd never heard of and I found Abigail Scott's life story to be a remarkable journey of determination, persistence, and finally, success. Her life wasn't easy and she endured many heartaches and backsets along the way, but in the end, Abigail Scott Duniway lived to register to vote in Multnomah County, Oregon and she also served on a jury! This story begins in 1852, when seventeen-year-old Abigail hears her brother proclaim that "You can't control anything, you females. Not a thing. Lucky for you us men protect you." What follows is the chronicle of her efforts to prove that women were very capable, they could take care of themselves, they deserved respect, and they needed the chance to voice their opinions. Women needed the right to vote! There are several pages of author's notes that relate many of Abigail's accomplishments and Kirkpatrick has been able to incorporate these facts into an engaging and entertaining fictional story based on biographical facts. Abigail experienced the hardships of traveling the Oregon Trail in the mid 1800s and she entered the work force while while raising her small children. As she pursued her passion to advance the rights of all women, Abigail even worked as a novelist and a newspaper publisher so that she could make sure that the word was being spread. Yes, Abigail Scott Dunlevy was a true pioneer and she paved the way for those of us who have followed! Kirkpatrick has once again proven her exceptional ability to find unique topics and then create stories that we all want to read. I recommend Something Worth Doing to all who enjoy Christian historical fiction. I give it 4.5 Stars! I received a copy of this book from Revell. There was no obligation for a positive review, I am voluntarily sharing my own thoughts.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kirby

    I will be the first person to state that I'm not a fan of the modern feminist movement. However, I've always held a great deal of respect for the amazing women in history who fought so hard for the many things we so easily take for granted in this day and age. I'm thankful that I have the opportunity to vote, have the choice to have an occupation, and have the blessing to be seen as an equal in the eyes of the government. When I heard that this one was based on the true life story of one of Amer I will be the first person to state that I'm not a fan of the modern feminist movement. However, I've always held a great deal of respect for the amazing women in history who fought so hard for the many things we so easily take for granted in this day and age. I'm thankful that I have the opportunity to vote, have the choice to have an occupation, and have the blessing to be seen as an equal in the eyes of the government. When I heard that this one was based on the true life story of one of America's most prominent suffragists, I definitely wanted to go ahead and give it a try. Unfortunately, while I did enjoy learning so much about America's history that I had no idea about (like how the women's vote was so tied up in prohibition legalities), I have to be honest and state that this book overall wasn't at all what I was expecting. I wanted to be able to cheer for Abigail and the great strides she made despite such a modest start to her life, but I couldn't bring myself to because I thought she behaved awful throughout the entire story, and neglected God, her husband Ben and all of her children in her quest to see women gain the right to vote. Many times she chooses to leave her family for long periods of time because she feels her cause is more worthwhile, and often her only thought for her entire family is in how she can use them to advance her cause. I've rarely read about such a selfish character in my entire years of reviewing, and I couldn't believe that she left her family for ten months without a backwards glance, and left her daughter on her death bed to find more purpose in her cause. I may admire the end results of Abigail's long fight for women's rights, but I can't say I admire her as a person at all. This entire novel has Abigail's quest come across as an idol she's built up the be the most important part of her life, and I had a hard time swallowing that, especially in a Christian fiction title. I do appreciate how much research Jane Kirkpatrick put into this novel, and it will definitely leave you feeling like you've learned a lot within its pages. However, this one was not for me personally, and won't be one that I will be recommending. Final Rating: 2/5. Thanks so much to Revell publishing for allowing me to read and review this! I voluntarily read and reviewed a complimentary copy of this novel from the publisher (Revell) as part of the Revell Reads Blog Tour Program. I was not required to give a positive review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christena

    This 2020 year is the 100th Anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment which affirmed U.S. women’s citizenship and granted us the right to vote. A most historical moment if you are a woman. To coincide with this historic anniversary was being able to read an exquisite book to help celebrate this momentous anniversary, Something Worth Doing by author Jane Kirkpatrick. It is books like these that should be read by every girl and woman. Why do I make such a profound statement? Here you are… We as a soci This 2020 year is the 100th Anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment which affirmed U.S. women’s citizenship and granted us the right to vote. A most historical moment if you are a woman. To coincide with this historic anniversary was being able to read an exquisite book to help celebrate this momentous anniversary, Something Worth Doing by author Jane Kirkpatrick. It is books like these that should be read by every girl and woman. Why do I make such a profound statement? Here you are… We as a society take too much for granted, especially women in this modern era. It was because of women like Abigail Scott Duniway, who is the central character in this book who recognized that women deserved to have their voices heard, to be recognized as having valuable insights, and should be treated like men in helping decide how they wanted their local, state, and national governments run. Something Worth Doing presents quite well the historical perspective that women’s struggles were long, enduring development. This was not a process that was within the span of a few years, it was a prolonged one where little steps were made yearly. Often those inroads saw setbacks but it never deterred women like Abigail for pressing forward one step at a time. Fictionalizing the story of Abigail is woven around a treasure trove of facts. The story is so well-written that I got lost in the story the more I read it. But the beauty of this book is how the author brought Abigail, Susan B. Anthony, and a host of others to life through her words. The author inspired me to want to see photos of Abigail. Thankfully, the Find-a-Grave website has photos of her, her husband, and her children. I even discovered Abigail’s voter registration card. Can you imagine if all of us, as women kept our first voter registration card? If it were not for these pioneer women, like Abigail, we would not have had the 19th Amendment. Yes – it would have come to pass, but not as early on as it did 100 years ago. Something Worth Doing is a must, must-read to help women of all ages understand and appreciate where their predecessors were and where we are today. Thank you, thank you, Jane, for this motivating story for us all.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karen R

    A stirring account of the life and work of a remarkable pioneer woman, Abigail Scott Duniway! The story begins with her arrival in Oregon Territory in 1852, working as a young teacher, and shows what she endured personally and professionally for decades as she worked towards bettering the lives of women by gaining their right to vote. It is an inspiring story of a woman dedicated to helping others and overcoming huge obstacles along the way. "No one knows what they can accomplish until they under A stirring account of the life and work of a remarkable pioneer woman, Abigail Scott Duniway! The story begins with her arrival in Oregon Territory in 1852, working as a young teacher, and shows what she endured personally and professionally for decades as she worked towards bettering the lives of women by gaining their right to vote. It is an inspiring story of a woman dedicated to helping others and overcoming huge obstacles along the way. "No one knows what they can accomplish until they undertake it." The author's careful and thorough research shines through with personal details, conveying what Abigail experienced and endured. I could feel her grief and loss, as well as joy in her triumphs. She was a wife, mother, author, business woman, journalist, public speaker and activist. Her story gave me a whole new appreciation of what women went through to accomplish things that we often take for granted now. Her husband's support helped her succeed as he saw value in her work. Their marriage seemed quite modern, as he stepped in to help on the homefront, understanding her need to travel later on and pursue her passion to achieve the vote. Their love story over the years was a beautiful one, inspiring after all they went through. He gave her wings to fly! Some mentions of faith sprinkled in showed her belief that she was "doing the Lord's work", encouraging other women. She left a legacy of a "fierce love for justice and liberty" for all, a timely message even in our era. Highly recommend for readers who enjoy historical fiction based on real people and events. 4.5 stars (An ebook was provided by the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cover Lover Book Review

    One thing I enjoy about historical fiction is that it teaches me something new about the world as well as myself. Something Worth Doing displays the hardships and inequalities of the 1800s and the gains of the suffragist movement. What I liked: Abigail Scott stood for women's rights and helped pave the way for future generations. I'm glad there were women who were willing to take a stand during this time when it wasn't so easy or common to do so. It is evident the author put a lot of time and effo One thing I enjoy about historical fiction is that it teaches me something new about the world as well as myself. Something Worth Doing displays the hardships and inequalities of the 1800s and the gains of the suffragist movement. What I liked: Abigail Scott stood for women's rights and helped pave the way for future generations. I'm glad there were women who were willing to take a stand during this time when it wasn't so easy or common to do so. It is evident the author put a lot of time and effort in research. The historical elements of the story are strong. What I wanted: Though I sympathized with the themes of this book, I found it difficult to connect with the key characters on a deeper, more emotional level. The characters felt a bit flat and complaining, and the storytelling style seemed to jump about, skimming elements of the story that would've made me feel more. Overall: It's difficult to articulate my feelings on this story. I enjoyed the historical elements and the hardships of the 1800s but wanted a stronger connection to the characters. I received a complimentary copy of this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chattynatty Van Waning

    Thank you to Revell, a division of Baker Publishing, for sending me this book to read and review. Historical Fiction +Suffragist movement= Abigail Scott Duniway's story This book spans 1853-1912. I felt like the beginning was a little slow for me. I was transported back to my childhood of reading Little House on the Prairie books. There was a lot of heartache, challenges, and physical moves that Abigail and her family experience in the beginning of this book. She is a independent woman who takes o Thank you to Revell, a division of Baker Publishing, for sending me this book to read and review. Historical Fiction +Suffragist movement= Abigail Scott Duniway's story This book spans 1853-1912. I felt like the beginning was a little slow for me. I was transported back to my childhood of reading Little House on the Prairie books. There was a lot of heartache, challenges, and physical moves that Abigail and her family experience in the beginning of this book. She is a independent woman who takes on winning the right for women to vote. She also is a journalist, editor of her own newspaper, millinery owner, seamstress, business woman and public speaker. OH, yeah- and she had 6 children. I thought this book was a great representation of trying to figure out the balance between being an independent minded woman, a mother, a wife, and a sister. Abigail didn't always come across being very present as a mother in this story, nor did she always seem over compassionate to her husband. However, maybe she couldn't be as she needed to be away from home so much regarding either her business or the fight to win the right for women to vote. I found the frustration and the struggles Abigail had to come up against to help women gain voting rights some of the same frustration woman in current times have in regard to being seen as formidable politicians, vice presidents and even president. When the vote doesn't get passed the first time through I felt pain and defeat for Abigail. I'm amazed at the ability for people to persevere and continue the fight. I loved Abigail's determination to move forward after the first defeat in stating... pg 267 "The only thing to displace the bitterness of defeat is the taste of victory." Abigail heard herself say those words even though she wasn't sure she believed them anymore. "We begin again. Grief cannot hold us back. We are wiser but not worn down..." Reminder- we can never give up to fight for the rights of all humans.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I really enjoy Kirkpatrick’s books and I was thrilled to read a copy of this book. I have to say I think this is one of her best books in the way that she wrote the historical details into the story. She really brought the characters to life. Whether you like Abigail or not, this book is based on historical facts and is a great look into women’s life during this time. I researched more about Abigail after finishing the book and was really amazed at how well she did in portraying her life. There I really enjoy Kirkpatrick’s books and I was thrilled to read a copy of this book. I have to say I think this is one of her best books in the way that she wrote the historical details into the story. She really brought the characters to life. Whether you like Abigail or not, this book is based on historical facts and is a great look into women’s life during this time. I researched more about Abigail after finishing the book and was really amazed at how well she did in portraying her life. There are a lot of things in this book that might raise some eyebrows in relation to Abigail’s perspective on life. She was a very opinionated woman. But even though I don't think I could relate to Abigail or necessarily want to I still really enjoyed reading her unique perspective. There are so many things that we take for granted these days and the extra amount of work women did only a century ago is amazing. We really should be grateful for those who came before us. The other thing I loved about this book is how it makes you realize people’s personalities really haven’t changed. There are many women who despise housework now just as they did before. I think we forget that even though people did what they did to survive back then it doesn’t mean they loved being homemakers. I think we have a certain image of how women were and this book brings to light a more realistic view on how a lot of women felt at the time. I recommend to history lovers. Five Stars. “I received this book from Revell for free. All opinions are my own and I was not required to write a positive review.”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Something Worth Doing, by Jane Kirkpatrick, is a powerful story based on Abigail Scott Duniway, a real true character in our countries history. This story focuses on Mrs. Duniway as a woman, wife, mother, sister, friend, business owner, and writer as well as her many decades working diligently for women's rights. For fiction readers interested in learning about our fore-mothers who worked so hard to earn us our many taken for granted rights, this is a must read. I struggle with writing this revie Something Worth Doing, by Jane Kirkpatrick, is a powerful story based on Abigail Scott Duniway, a real true character in our countries history. This story focuses on Mrs. Duniway as a woman, wife, mother, sister, friend, business owner, and writer as well as her many decades working diligently for women's rights. For fiction readers interested in learning about our fore-mothers who worked so hard to earn us our many taken for granted rights, this is a must read. I struggle with writing this review. Only God could have had a hand in current events happening at the time of the release of this book. The story is so well written it is so easy to get caught up in it. At times I got really frustrated with Mrs. Duniway for putting her work for women's rights before the needs of her family. I strongly feel this is a must read, especially for those who do not read non-fiction. The author contains a chapter at the end of the story outlining her extensive research and how she kept true to events in the story. I received a copy of this book from Revell Reads Blogging Program. This is my honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Something Worth Doing is the fictionalized historical account of the life of Abigail Duniway, an early American suffragist living in the Oregon Territory. Something Worth Doing was an interesting read, though an unusual one for me. The topic is feminism, told from the perspective of a frontier woman living in the mid 1800s. Abigail was a very determined woman, and from her youth, her focus was on the unfairness of women’s lives when compared to men’s. She believed the first step to women being v Something Worth Doing is the fictionalized historical account of the life of Abigail Duniway, an early American suffragist living in the Oregon Territory. Something Worth Doing was an interesting read, though an unusual one for me. The topic is feminism, told from the perspective of a frontier woman living in the mid 1800s. Abigail was a very determined woman, and from her youth, her focus was on the unfairness of women’s lives when compared to men’s. She believed the first step to women being viewed as equals was to get them the right to vote, and Abigail spent her life trying to get that goal. She was also married to a good man and had a number of children. As she battled for women’s rights and at times financially supported her family, she struggled with balancing family life with her career. She made mistakes, but in the end, she determined that it was “something worth doing, no matter the cost.” The author brought Abigail’s story to life, telling her story more in novel form than as a biography. (I’m not sure how much of the emotions and conversations are accurate to history.) One thing I thought was interesting was that I was reading the book ‘Lies Women Believe’ at the same time that I read this book, and the viewpoints between the two books differed. Both said that women were equal with men, but SWD focused on women’s rights and equality while LWB focused on the importance of family and of God. I wonder, could women retain their equality while being willing, sometimes, to sacrifice their own rights for the sake of loving their God and families? I received a complementary copy of this book. All opinions are entirely my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Urban

    Something Worth Doing by Jane Kirkpatrick is a phenomenal read. The emotional journey immediately swept me up into the book. I was impressed. All the feels grabbed me. The fears, loss, grief, love, and ambition are covered in this book. It was an epic rollercoaster ride. When the ending came, I was sad that the journey had come to an end. I wasn't ready to finish the book. The characters are fantastic. Realistic, quirky, caring, hardworking, and smart. They work hard for their life. They did eve Something Worth Doing by Jane Kirkpatrick is a phenomenal read. The emotional journey immediately swept me up into the book. I was impressed. All the feels grabbed me. The fears, loss, grief, love, and ambition are covered in this book. It was an epic rollercoaster ride. When the ending came, I was sad that the journey had come to an end. I wasn't ready to finish the book. The characters are fantastic. Realistic, quirky, caring, hardworking, and smart. They work hard for their life. They did everything they could to help and provide not only for themselves but for others. As in this case, the heroine fought for women's rights. She did so much. Her marriage with her husband Ben was a good one. I enjoyed that part, too. Overall, I recommend readers to dig into this novel. It was worth every page! I received this copy from the publisher. This is my voluntary review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kelly-Ann ~ Sassy Bookish Mama

    The summary and cover of this book definitely drew me in when I first saw it. The fact that was historical fiction definitely drew me in as well. In this book we meet Abigail Scott who is the main character and who the book is all about. She is an independent woman with big ideas and big dreams. She is not interested in marriage or having someone telling her what she can and cannot do. She starts out life trying to set to map out her life but it doesn't go according to her plan. We meet Ben who The summary and cover of this book definitely drew me in when I first saw it. The fact that was historical fiction definitely drew me in as well. In this book we meet Abigail Scott who is the main character and who the book is all about. She is an independent woman with big ideas and big dreams. She is not interested in marriage or having someone telling her what she can and cannot do. She starts out life trying to set to map out her life but it doesn't go according to her plan. We meet Ben who definitely falls in love with Abigail and courts her. Due to a circumstance with her father she has to move the wedding to Ben a lot sooner than she expected. He is truly the ideal mate for her. He supports her every idea and doesn't stifle that independent heart that she has. This was my first book by Jane Kirkpatrick. She definitely does an excellent job in her research and even adding her fictional characters and fiction themes was flawless. Especially this being a historical biographical fiction she really made sure that everything was correct which I appreciate when reading this genre. But I have to admit that I did not enjoy the main character at all. I feel like she focused so much on being independent and pursuing her dreams I felt like she completely ignored her husband and children and it broke my heart for them. If you enjoy real-life historical fiction then this is definitely the book that you may want to pick up.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    “To move forward, she’d have to believe that something was worth doing no matter how it turned out.” Compelling and thought-provoking, Jane Kirkpatrick’s “Something Worth Doing” presents a fictional but reality-based depiction of suffragist Abigail Scott Duniway. In all honesty, this is the first that I recall ever hearing about her, despite her decades of work toward women’s enfranchisement. Kirkpatrick mentions in her author notes that she chose to focus more on Abigail’s personal life, and thi “To move forward, she’d have to believe that something was worth doing no matter how it turned out.” Compelling and thought-provoking, Jane Kirkpatrick’s “Something Worth Doing” presents a fictional but reality-based depiction of suffragist Abigail Scott Duniway. In all honesty, this is the first that I recall ever hearing about her, despite her decades of work toward women’s enfranchisement. Kirkpatrick mentions in her author notes that she chose to focus more on Abigail’s personal life, and this is what gives the book its distinctive tone, in my opinion. It actually took me much longer than usual to read, and I think that the complexities of Abigail’s character and the extraordinary details of her life’s journey are the reason. Even though she is clearly modeled after a famous historical figure, I have to credit Kirkpatrick with truly tapping into Abigail’s personality and lifting her from the pages of history—faults, assets, and all. In a larger context, “Something Worth Doing” applies to struggles beyond that of women’s suffrage and women’s rights. Whereas most historical fiction includes a happily-ever-after preceded by a standard plot structure, this one diverges. The solemn tone throughout reflects the hardships of life, and particularly women’s lives, in the nineteenth-century, highlighting their inability to own property, influence laws through voting, and have careers outside the home and their subsequent status as dependent on the men in their lives. Many of the controversies in the novel remain prevalent today in some form, emphasizing how progressive Abigail and her compatriots really were. In my opinion, part of the reason that she was able to retain her reputation in the midst of her outspoken platform was in her approach: “My way is a ‘still hunt.’ Quiet coercion of men in power and men in general to be less frightened by women.” I was intrigued by her speculation about how equality between men and women would have been the result had Columbus landed on the West Coast, rather than the East, and her persistence through so many setbacks and even outright failures is quite remarkable. Abigail’s story as told by Kirkpatrick invites reflection and contemplation, aided by engaging chapter titles and a set of discussion questions at the end of the book. While I admire Abigail’s tenacity and dedication to the cause, I also feel a great deal of sadness for her because she sacrificed tenderness and stronger relationships with her family on behalf of her suffrage work, a forfeit that she did choose willingly. She acknowledges as much by noting that “The married women and mothers working in the cause bore an extra burden to make sure their own daughters weren’t set aside for the larger effort. Advocacy had its price, even with occasional privileges.” Such is the case with any passion or cause that we take up today as much as it was a century ago, and thus this story resonates so profoundly. Perhaps this is why I enjoyed Ben’s supportive presence so much, reminding us all that “Things didn’t always turn out well, as Ben proposed, but some things were worth doing, regardless.” I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell and was under no obligation to post a positive review. All opinions are my own.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lifeofliterature

    I love Jane Kirkpatrick’s stories because she does a fantastic job of researching her history! This particular novel is based on a true story, which is very fascinating. I was intrigued by all the history surrounding women’s rights and felt that the story was well researched and well written. The tone of this story is more serious than other fictional works I typically read, but I did learn a lot. I think the book was a little dry at times. I appreciate the author’s hard work in writing a charac I love Jane Kirkpatrick’s stories because she does a fantastic job of researching her history! This particular novel is based on a true story, which is very fascinating. I was intrigued by all the history surrounding women’s rights and felt that the story was well researched and well written. The tone of this story is more serious than other fictional works I typically read, but I did learn a lot. I think the book was a little dry at times. I appreciate the author’s hard work in writing a character that is flawed, with mistakes along her journey, but she still triumphed and paved the way for women. Overall, I liked this book, although I think those who like history and even nonfiction works may enjoy this more than others. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell Publishing. Opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    One woman's passion to give women the vote. All the obstacles she took with the stigma of being a woman, her upbringing, her relationship with her brother, and the support of her husband. Abigail Scott took the victory and the heartbreak of all women. An ever changing world back in 1853, Abigail saw the potential of women's vote. In many ways she sacrificed her own family for Something Worth Doing. The history of this time is important for us to reflect and to hold on to the truths of liberty and One woman's passion to give women the vote. All the obstacles she took with the stigma of being a woman, her upbringing, her relationship with her brother, and the support of her husband. Abigail Scott took the victory and the heartbreak of all women. An ever changing world back in 1853, Abigail saw the potential of women's vote. In many ways she sacrificed her own family for Something Worth Doing. The history of this time is important for us to reflect and to hold on to the truths of liberty and justice for all. It is amazing the fortitude Abigail had but she also had the support of her husband. It was very well written as it showed the historical but all the sacrifices made by one woman for all women. A special thank you to Revell and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    Something Worth Doing was an interesting book! . The characters were fun! I love how stubborn and determined Abigail was. She reminds me of Michaela Quinn from Doctor Quinn: Medicine Woman. Ben was perfect! Him and Abigail made a very cute couple. The plot was interesting. I felt like it jumped around a bit too much. I had a hard time following it at some points and I was having a hard time getting into it. i can see why people would love this book! Like I said, the characters were fun and the pl Something Worth Doing was an interesting book! . The characters were fun! I love how stubborn and determined Abigail was. She reminds me of Michaela Quinn from Doctor Quinn: Medicine Woman. Ben was perfect! Him and Abigail made a very cute couple. The plot was interesting. I felt like it jumped around a bit too much. I had a hard time following it at some points and I was having a hard time getting into it. i can see why people would love this book! Like I said, the characters were fun and the plot was interesting. It just wasn't for me. *I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a honest review. All thoughts expressed are strictly my own.**

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This was the historical fiction about Abigail Duniway who was involved in the suffragist movement in the West. This was such an interesting book for me and something too often I take for granted. It wasn't only the right to vote that Abigail fought for but also more rights for women. It was interesting to note that the pressures she faced are some that I fave today as well. Im not sure whether they are self imposed or by those around us but something to think about! Thanks so much to netgalley an This was the historical fiction about Abigail Duniway who was involved in the suffragist movement in the West. This was such an interesting book for me and something too often I take for granted. It wasn't only the right to vote that Abigail fought for but also more rights for women. It was interesting to note that the pressures she faced are some that I fave today as well. Im not sure whether they are self imposed or by those around us but something to think about! Thanks so much to netgalley and the publisher for the copy. The views expressed here are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carol Brownrigg

    Never Forget As with all of Jane's books I thoroughly enjoyed this one. We must never forget how long it took, how difficult the fight was to achieve women's suffrage and the mighty women who fought for it. Bringing in the human spirit of a character of this magnitude is indeed something worth doing. Never Forget As with all of Jane's books I thoroughly enjoyed this one. We must never forget how long it took, how difficult the fight was to achieve women's suffrage and the mighty women who fought for it. Bringing in the human spirit of a character of this magnitude is indeed something worth doing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joylynne

    This was a light read but so good. I am eager to read some of her other books..if learning about women's history I strongly recommend this book . Well done Me. Kirkpatrick. This was a light read but so good. I am eager to read some of her other books..if learning about women's history I strongly recommend this book . Well done Me. Kirkpatrick.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate Campos

    *I received a copy of the book for review from the publisher through Booklist.

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