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The Real Price of Everything: Rediscovering the Six Classics of Economics

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In his New York Times bestsellers Liar’s Poker and Moneyball, Michael Lewis gave us an unprecedented look at what goes on behind the scenes on Wall Street. Now he takes us back across the centuries to explore the four classics that created and defined not just Wall Street, but the entire economic system we live under today. Brought together with Lewis’s illuminating editor In his New York Times bestsellers Liar’s Poker and Moneyball, Michael Lewis gave us an unprecedented look at what goes on behind the scenes on Wall Street. Now he takes us back across the centuries to explore the four classics that created and defined not just Wall Street, but the entire economic system we live under today. Brought together with Lewis’s illuminating editorial commentary, they form an essential reference for any student of economics—in fact, for anyone who wants to understand the market forces and government policies that have shaped our world, and will continue to shape our future. Includes: 1776: The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith 1798: An Essay on the Principle of Population by Thomas Malthus 1817: Principles of Political Economy and Taxation by David Ricardo 1899: The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions by Thorstein Veblen 1936: The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money by John Maynard Keynes


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In his New York Times bestsellers Liar’s Poker and Moneyball, Michael Lewis gave us an unprecedented look at what goes on behind the scenes on Wall Street. Now he takes us back across the centuries to explore the four classics that created and defined not just Wall Street, but the entire economic system we live under today. Brought together with Lewis’s illuminating editor In his New York Times bestsellers Liar’s Poker and Moneyball, Michael Lewis gave us an unprecedented look at what goes on behind the scenes on Wall Street. Now he takes us back across the centuries to explore the four classics that created and defined not just Wall Street, but the entire economic system we live under today. Brought together with Lewis’s illuminating editorial commentary, they form an essential reference for any student of economics—in fact, for anyone who wants to understand the market forces and government policies that have shaped our world, and will continue to shape our future. Includes: 1776: The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith 1798: An Essay on the Principle of Population by Thomas Malthus 1817: Principles of Political Economy and Taxation by David Ricardo 1899: The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions by Thorstein Veblen 1936: The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money by John Maynard Keynes

30 review for The Real Price of Everything: Rediscovering the Six Classics of Economics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Yong

    The works themselves are great. The problem is with the format in which they're presented. There are no individual contents pages for each work, and no header telling you which book and chapter you are at. At over 1400 pages the book is a monster, which makes getting lost easy when there's nothing but page numbers and author name at the top. This is a problem with The Wealth of Nations especially, with multiple books. The sheer size and weight of the book are a problem in themselves, although some m The works themselves are great. The problem is with the format in which they're presented. There are no individual contents pages for each work, and no header telling you which book and chapter you are at. At over 1400 pages the book is a monster, which makes getting lost easy when there's nothing but page numbers and author name at the top. This is a problem with The Wealth of Nations especially, with multiple books. The sheer size and weight of the book are a problem in themselves, although some may like that.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erin Cook

    It's Lewis, hey

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bruna Menegatti

    The book is a compilation of extracts from 6 of the most renowned economists who served as base for today's economical theories (Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Mackay, Veblen and Keynes). A massive book and rather a time-commitment, but contains the most relevant bits and pieces from the most cited literature in economics with a brief introduction to each author and their most important contributions to the field. One should note that entire chapters from the original books make up the compilation (rat The book is a compilation of extracts from 6 of the most renowned economists who served as base for today's economical theories (Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Mackay, Veblen and Keynes). A massive book and rather a time-commitment, but contains the most relevant bits and pieces from the most cited literature in economics with a brief introduction to each author and their most important contributions to the field. One should note that entire chapters from the original books make up the compilation (rather than having shorter specific paragraphs only), which by no means makes it an easy read. It would have been interesting to see a more in-depth analysis of the content exposed in relation to modern economics, although this would habe been impossible to accommodate in one volume alone.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    The only value in this book is by having all 6 books adjacent to each other, do that when, e.g., Keynes is dunking on Ricardo late in his "General Theory," you know what he's talking about. Another e.g., everyone seems to know what Smith did and didn't day, so it's great to compare that to the recollection of what he actually said.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    very long read, contains long excerpts from other older books actually whole chapters, such as Adam Smith Wealth of Nations. Of course, written long time ago, so the english is not modern. Stopped reading after the author's intro plus a few pages into Adam Smith.

  6. 4 out of 5

    John Anderson

    Did not have the energy nor love for Econ that I thought I had. Maybe some other time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Cook

    Bought the ebook not realizing how freaking MASSIVE this work is. It was definitely worth the read, though. Lewis offered solid insights on all six pieces contained in the book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Matheson

    6 classic econ books

  9. 5 out of 5

    Forrest Baumhover

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liliana

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica McNeil

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kelli Spencer

  14. 5 out of 5

    Charter Harrison

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matt Weitl

  16. 5 out of 5

    TIm Judge

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ziad Abdelnour

  18. 4 out of 5

    Neelam

  19. 4 out of 5

    eric bubar

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tobin Trevarthen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Webster

  23. 4 out of 5

    Grant

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lukashod

  25. 5 out of 5

    Samantha McGuire (Mirror Bridge Books)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jan Eglen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Clint Weaver

  28. 4 out of 5

    James

  29. 5 out of 5

    Saadh Shehzed

  30. 5 out of 5

    Glen Magnuson

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