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The End of the Third Age is comprised of the first section of the hardcover volume published as Sauron Defeated, the ninth volume of The History of Middle-earth. It completes Christopher Tolkien's account of the creation of The Lord of the Rings begun in the earlier volumes, The Return of the Shadow, The Treason of Isengard, and The War of the Ring. The End of the Third Age The End of the Third Age is comprised of the first section of the hardcover volume published as Sauron Defeated, the ninth volume of The History of Middle-earth. It completes Christopher Tolkien's account of the creation of The Lord of the Rings begun in the earlier volumes, The Return of the Shadow, The Treason of Isengard, and The War of the Ring. The End of the Third Age begins with Sam's rescue of Frodo from the Tower of Kirith Ungol, and giving a very different account of the Scouring of the Shire, this part ends with versions of the hitherto unpublished Epilogue, in which, years after the departure of Bilbo and Frodo from the Grey Havens, Sam attempts to answer his children's questions. The book is illustrated with changing conceptions of Kirith Ungol and Mount Doom, as well as previously unpublished drawings of Orthanc and Dunharrow.


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The End of the Third Age is comprised of the first section of the hardcover volume published as Sauron Defeated, the ninth volume of The History of Middle-earth. It completes Christopher Tolkien's account of the creation of The Lord of the Rings begun in the earlier volumes, The Return of the Shadow, The Treason of Isengard, and The War of the Ring. The End of the Third Age The End of the Third Age is comprised of the first section of the hardcover volume published as Sauron Defeated, the ninth volume of The History of Middle-earth. It completes Christopher Tolkien's account of the creation of The Lord of the Rings begun in the earlier volumes, The Return of the Shadow, The Treason of Isengard, and The War of the Ring. The End of the Third Age begins with Sam's rescue of Frodo from the Tower of Kirith Ungol, and giving a very different account of the Scouring of the Shire, this part ends with versions of the hitherto unpublished Epilogue, in which, years after the departure of Bilbo and Frodo from the Grey Havens, Sam attempts to answer his children's questions. The book is illustrated with changing conceptions of Kirith Ungol and Mount Doom, as well as previously unpublished drawings of Orthanc and Dunharrow.

30 review for The End of the Third Age: The History of The Lord of the Rings, Part Four

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deborah O'Carroll

    Reason everyone should read this: it includes two versions of an unpublished Epilogue to LOTR that Tolkien wrote but was tragically talked out of including in the published book. It features Sam recounting things to his adorable Hobbit children, and answers lots of questions, and somehow makes the ending WAY LESS BITTERSWEET. Seriously, just read this epilogue thing, even if you don't read the rest of this History of Middle-earth book. (Also, this section is also collected in a book called Sau Reason everyone should read this: it includes two versions of an unpublished Epilogue to LOTR that Tolkien wrote but was tragically talked out of including in the published book. It features Sam recounting things to his adorable Hobbit children, and answers lots of questions, and somehow makes the ending WAY LESS BITTERSWEET. <3 Seriously, just read this epilogue thing, even if you don't read the rest of this History of Middle-earth book. (Also, this section is also collected in a book called Sauron Defeated, which includes an unfinished story Tolkien started which deals with timey-wimey things and it's fabulous too. It's called The Notion Club Papers and I love it.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The End of the Third Age: The History of The Lord of the Rings, Part Four (The History of Middle-earth, #9a), J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (Editor)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    This volume brings to a close the story, save only for the Appendices - which are certainly worth reading. The volume starts with Frodo and Sam having just crossed in Mordor and the quest is resolved fairly rapidly, occupying less than half the book. The remainder of the book concerns the last events of the Third Age and the earliest events of the Fourth Age, in which the chapter "The Scouring of the Shire" plays an important part. This chapter essentially brings the story full circle, in that i This volume brings to a close the story, save only for the Appendices - which are certainly worth reading. The volume starts with Frodo and Sam having just crossed in Mordor and the quest is resolved fairly rapidly, occupying less than half the book. The remainder of the book concerns the last events of the Third Age and the earliest events of the Fourth Age, in which the chapter "The Scouring of the Shire" plays an important part. This chapter essentially brings the story full circle, in that it begins with hobbits and it ends with hobbits. It had certainly been far too long since I last read Lord of the Rings, and I have enjoyed rereading it immensely.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    The End of the Third Age...and the end of LOTR History I’m sorry to see it end, but very curious to see what’s next as I switch over to Sauron Defeated to see what Christopher Tolkien has in store next.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anna C

    This is worth reading just for the '14 years later' extended epilogue of Sam and his children (which is significantly better than the '19 years later' extended epilogue of Harry Potter and his children).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael Joosten

    SPOILER: I have never actually read this as a standalone volume, but I appreciate that it exists as one, because in having reread the LotR-volumes of The History of Middle-earth, it is convenient that this book exists, especially as a concept. The history of Book VI of The Lord of the Rings, it's impressive (after three volumes documenting how atypical this was) that Tolkien was able to set much down with little change between first draft and final draft. The sole exception is "The Scouring the S SPOILER: I have never actually read this as a standalone volume, but I appreciate that it exists as one, because in having reread the LotR-volumes of The History of Middle-earth, it is convenient that this book exists, especially as a concept. The history of Book VI of The Lord of the Rings, it's impressive (after three volumes documenting how atypical this was) that Tolkien was able to set much down with little change between first draft and final draft. The sole exception is "The Scouring the Shire," which had long been anticipated and is fundamental to the book--its lack of appearance in the Peter Jackson movies being among their many crimes. The epilogue is, as much as something unpublished can be, clearly "canonical" in a way the HoME texts about the LotR rarely are, and worth the price of admission alone--though I think Tolkien was counselled aright to drop it. The ending without it is perfect and diluted with it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This book brings to a close the presentation of JRR Tolkien’s manuscripts and maps and drawings with which he produced the Lord of the Rings. It includes a charming, but unpublished, Epilogue involving Samwise Gamgee and his children. Since it would have been even more anticlimactic than the Scouring of the Shire already was, it’s probably just as well that it wasn’t published. But the whole series is worth the read for the insights into Tolkien’s original ideas and plans for his epic story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Gerhart

    I really loved this book. It retold the ending of the Lord of the Rings series as well as added some bonus epilogues not in the original story. Once again Christopher Tolkien did a wonderful job of explaining how his father J.R.R. Tolkien came up with the story in the notes following each chapter.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    An outstanding look into the development of the final chapters of J.R.R. Tolkien's Return of the King. There is also the bonus of two versions of an epilogue that the Professor wrote but was talked out of adding to the story (something he later regretted). Excellent read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Good for what's there, but it leaves out The Notion Club papers, which are part of v. 9

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marc Therrien

    Une lecture intéressante pour tout passionné de l’univers de la Terre-du-Milieu, qui nous plonge dans le monde de Tolkien tout comme dans son esprit.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Geraud

    Petit livre pas désagréable à lire pour les fans inconditionnels de Seigneur des Anneaux. au cas où les trois pavés de 600 pages chacun ne seraient pas assez. On y apprends pléthores anecdotes non inclues dans les romans finaux. Cependant je me suis toujours posés certaines questions sur la santé mentale de Tolkien en parcourant ce livre. en effet beaucoup de passages sont présentés comme faisant partie de le chronique royale de telle dynastie du Gondor où de telles annales historiques. ce qui es Petit livre pas désagréable à lire pour les fans inconditionnels de Seigneur des Anneaux. au cas où les trois pavés de 600 pages chacun ne seraient pas assez. On y apprends pléthores anecdotes non inclues dans les romans finaux. Cependant je me suis toujours posés certaines questions sur la santé mentale de Tolkien en parcourant ce livre. en effet beaucoup de passages sont présentés comme faisant partie de le chronique royale de telle dynastie du Gondor où de telles annales historiques. ce qui est inquiétant vu que l'on parle bien entendu d'une fiction et que ces même sources sont fictives elles aussi. certaines fois, Christopher Tolkien s'interroge même pour savoir si telle source est plus valable que telle autre. il en arrive donc à se poser la question de la validité de deux sources toutes aussi fictives l'une que l'autre. Bon. Soit ce cher Petit est un peu surmené et prends sont travail de compilateur trop à cœur, soit il a définitivement perdu la raison. Donc même si vous êtes fan de Tolkien, je vous en prie ne prenez pas ce petit opus trop au sérieux.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    About a third or a fourth in size of the other three volumes in the History of the Lord of the Rings (probably due to the fact that the material of this book was originally the first third of Sauron Defeated, volume nine in the History of Middle-earth series), this book covers the story between Sam's rescue of Frodo at the tower of Cirith Ungol (originally Kirith Ungol) on the borders of Mordor, and takes the story through to its end, and beyond. Its most interesting chapter covers the writing o About a third or a fourth in size of the other three volumes in the History of the Lord of the Rings (probably due to the fact that the material of this book was originally the first third of Sauron Defeated, volume nine in the History of Middle-earth series), this book covers the story between Sam's rescue of Frodo at the tower of Cirith Ungol (originally Kirith Ungol) on the borders of Mordor, and takes the story through to its end, and beyond. Its most interesting chapter covers the writing of an unpublished Epilogue, in which Sam, at work writing in the Red Book of Westmarch, talks to his children about his adventures and what happened to the various characters after the story ended. There are also some fairly interestng deviations in the "Scouring of the Shire" chapter as well. As with the previous three books in this series, anyone interested in Tolkien as a writer will get a lot out of these accounts of his books' history. I certainly enjoyed it, and consider it an essential addition to the Tolkien shelf of my library.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Trilllian

    très intéressant à lire en complément du Seigneur des anneaux et surtout du Silmarillon, à lire si on est fan de l'univers de tolkien et qu'on aime en savoir plus sur certaines choses et certaines personnes;

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Smith

    SAURON DEFEATED; THE END OF THE THIRD AGE (THE HISTORY OF THE LORD OF THE RINGS PART FOUR): THE NOTION CLUB PAPERS {AND} THE DROWNING OF ANADUNE. Edited by Christopher Tolkien. The History of Middle-Earth, Vol. IX by J.R.R. Tolkien (1992)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    Satisfying conclusion to my epic nerdy journey through the writing of the Lord of the Rings. Looking at the never-published epilogue was especially interesting. I love Tolkien!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mathieu

    Le fait que ce soit inachevée, ben ça gâche un peu le plaisir... Pas le meilleur Tolkien que j' ai lu... C'est vraiment parce que je suis fan...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Francisco

    Publicación de material no terminado y que se descartó en la composición de El Silmarillión y El señor de los Anillos. De interés para fanáticos de Tolkien (como yo).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hojaplateada

    Recuerdo sobre todo lo sorprendente que fué leer sobre los istari y las palantiri

  20. 4 out of 5

    Goss

  21. 5 out of 5

    John

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian Schweitzer

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  24. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura Lesh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Airotsihraad

  27. 4 out of 5

    Logan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marien Ortiz

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jose Emiterio

  30. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan Gale

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