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Story of the World, Vol. 4 Audiobook: History for the Classical Child: The Modern Age

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This spirited reading of the first in Susan Wise Bauer's Story of the World history series brings to life the stories and records of the peoples of ancient times. Now more than ever, other countries and customs affect our everyday lives-and our children need to learn about the people who live all around the globe. Susan Wise Bauer has provided a captivating guide to the his This spirited reading of the first in Susan Wise Bauer's Story of the World history series brings to life the stories and records of the peoples of ancient times. Now more than ever, other countries and customs affect our everyday lives-and our children need to learn about the people who live all around the globe. Susan Wise Bauer has provided a captivating guide to the history of the ancient world. Written in an engaging, straightforward manner, The Story of the World weaves world history into a storybook format. This volume covers the major historical events of the years 1850 to the late 1990s, from the reign of England's Queen Victoria to the collapse of the Berlin Wall. This Story of the World audiobook is a collaboration between Jim Weiss, whose voice has been described as “liquid gold” (CNN-TV), and Susan Wise Bauer, whose writing has been described as “timeless and intelligent” (Publishers Weekly). It may be used along with the print books (The Story of the World Volume 4 Text Book, Activity Book, and Tests; each sold separately), as a supplement to a traditional history curriculum, or independently. Approximately 12 hours on 11 CDs.


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This spirited reading of the first in Susan Wise Bauer's Story of the World history series brings to life the stories and records of the peoples of ancient times. Now more than ever, other countries and customs affect our everyday lives-and our children need to learn about the people who live all around the globe. Susan Wise Bauer has provided a captivating guide to the his This spirited reading of the first in Susan Wise Bauer's Story of the World history series brings to life the stories and records of the peoples of ancient times. Now more than ever, other countries and customs affect our everyday lives-and our children need to learn about the people who live all around the globe. Susan Wise Bauer has provided a captivating guide to the history of the ancient world. Written in an engaging, straightforward manner, The Story of the World weaves world history into a storybook format. This volume covers the major historical events of the years 1850 to the late 1990s, from the reign of England's Queen Victoria to the collapse of the Berlin Wall. This Story of the World audiobook is a collaboration between Jim Weiss, whose voice has been described as “liquid gold” (CNN-TV), and Susan Wise Bauer, whose writing has been described as “timeless and intelligent” (Publishers Weekly). It may be used along with the print books (The Story of the World Volume 4 Text Book, Activity Book, and Tests; each sold separately), as a supplement to a traditional history curriculum, or independently. Approximately 12 hours on 11 CDs.

30 review for Story of the World, Vol. 4 Audiobook: History for the Classical Child: The Modern Age

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    It all started with the introduction. Susan Wise Bauer starts this work with an introduction (like she does with the others) and I was disturbed. It's just a page or two, but it bothered me. The tone communicates these opening words were written at the end of a long, difficult project (which I am sure this was). Perhaps she was too rushed. But after I got over her strong exhortation not to expose a child younger than 4th grade to this material, this is what bothered me: 1) What she said was histo It all started with the introduction. Susan Wise Bauer starts this work with an introduction (like she does with the others) and I was disturbed. It's just a page or two, but it bothered me. The tone communicates these opening words were written at the end of a long, difficult project (which I am sure this was). Perhaps she was too rushed. But after I got over her strong exhortation not to expose a child younger than 4th grade to this material, this is what bothered me: 1) What she said was historically incorrect. She references a revolution-despotism cycle as inevitable. Yet, the American Revolution did not lead (at least not immediately) to a dictatorial form of government. Is it the exception? Perhaps. Seeing as the audience is primarily North American and we are coming to this introduction having just studied the American Revolution, her assertion struck me as odd at best, inaccurate at worst. Of course, we also hear of the revolution of Canada and it's quest to govern itself within the commonwealth early in this volume. Again, no tyranny there either. Hmmm.... 2) What she said was theologically shallow. The tone of the introduction reflected a despair common to post-modern times. Was Bauer that discouraged, wearied, and despondent about what she had written? And if so, do we want to read/ listen to it? Here the lack of Church History in her coverage of the world is notable. For the only true hope of the world is Jesus himself. Her thoughts reminded me of Ecclesiastes 12:12b-14 "... Of making many books there is no end, and much study wearies the body. Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the duty of all mankind. For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing,whether it is good or evil." It got worse from there. Capitalism is an exploitative system in Bauer's world, and investors are particularly predatory, not to mention philanthropists who all made their money through oppression and give back to the community merely to assuage their pervasive guilt. While an all-glory-to-the-USDollar approach would have been equally disturbing, the lack of acknowledgment of how a free market system has contributed to the prosperity of individual Americans as well as our international influence was disturbing - especially when so many other communist, socialist states are covered. Nor does she include the massive innovations in technology that the free market system fostered. FDRs New Deal is far to favorably endorsed-to the point of erroneously being credited with pulling the country out of the Depression, an assertion few believe. I found the chapter on Kennedy concerning. The author rhapsodizes about his idyllic image and how his assassination forced people to face America's challenges. In order to further the prospect of a Kennedy America at peace, chapters preceding the assassination are upbeat (especially for this installment!), and rather negative after - even though many of these topical matters (such as the civil rights movement) predated Kennedy and continued beyond his presidency. I find it hard to believe American's didn't feel the tension of segregation and Jim Crow laws prior to Kennedy's unexpected death -- or that people were oblivious to the Cold War! Speaking of the Cold War. Bauer didn't seem to ever clarify that the Soviets violated their agreements with the US after WWII and instead of retreating to liberate countries (as the Allies faithfully did), they annexed them. Instead, she spends a lot of time talking about how Americans were 'afraid' of the Soviets as if this was a mere emotional perception or diplomatic misunderstanding. Yet, she doesn't present the Soviet's 'fear' of the Americans. Why? I found myself wanting to tally these terms to get a count. I also thought events in the Middle East were a bit lopsided. It's good to get the Arab point of view on Palestine across, but the Bauer never questions WHY a Palestinian state wasn't formed by Arabs when they had the chance, nor does she explain why the Palestinian refugee crises persists instead of surrounding Arab countries absorbing the displaced (as has happened with numerous other conflicts throughout history)? This is not to say their weren't high points. I liked the coverage of the decay of the Ottoman Empire and how it affected the balance of power throughout Europe, the brutal transformation of the Belgian Congo to Zaire, the Iranian rebellion, the intricate failures of country partitions, and the discussion of nuclear power. I consider this series a good supplement but not a main event. Sometimes I think Bauer, like many who have spent much time in books, is too smart in the worldly pursuits for her own good. She loses theological footing and needs to be drawn away from world history to Biblical Study, to re-orientate, reset, and try to approach the material from a Biblical perspective that attempts to perceive how God is moving in the midst of man's foibles and horrors. Discussions of the role missionaries played in freedom movements through the post-colonial world, language transcription and translation efforts as well as humanitarian aid movements that brought massive transfers of wealth and people from the West to third world countries -- all initiatives in which Christians played major roles -- would have gone a long way to presenting hope. Without this, we are in danger of teaching ourselves and our children to despair, just like the world around us. This despair is hard to miss in light of the change in style. Throughout the series, Bauer has used story to engage us with the historical account, and while there are some glimmers of her whimsical style coming through, by her own admission, she had to eliminate much of that type of content due to the graphic nature of modern time destruction and cruelty. This gives the account a more rigid feeling than previous installments. Finally, I have noticed that the closer you get to modern times, the more difficult it is to agree with another person's perception of the historical record. While we have enough perspective to declare authoritatively that the Peloponnese War weakened the Greek city states, we are still debating the merits of a free market economy, nuclear power and whether or not American influence in the world is positive. Our personal connection to these events renders us far more opinionated about recent Presidents, or even FDR or JFK, than we are about Alexander the Great (who was responsible for a lot of warring and conquering). In previous installments, I was content with Bauer's presentation as "good enough," but in Volume III: The Early Modern Age, we started to diverge and now in Volume IV, I find our journey together uncomfortable at best and can no longer recommend her path to others. In fact, I was relieved when we were finished. Ultimately, I have discovered Story of the World to be a secular series for Christians. It won't attack your faith or demean it like many secular history accounts will, and that has value to educating our children. However, it also will not particularly strengthen your faith or inspire you with God's movement through history or the lives of the saints who have gone before. I am in pursuit of a world history for children that both respects and inspires.... I have recently discovered a title that contradicts the robber baron mentality of Bauer's coverage of Gilded Age entrepreneurship. See, The Myth of the Robber Baron, Folsom, 1991 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Want to start at the beginning of the series, see The Story of the World: Ancients, Wise Bauer, 2006 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    Great book for homeschool history. I am using this book with Moving Beyond The Page's Book Thief unit. I don't like how the unit has links instead of books, this book gives lots of good history for our unit. My kids enjoy the writing, not boring, has maps that are included, and doesn't share graphic things about war.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ava

    The Ambleside Online schedule had me reading a ton per week, and it was A LOT. And some of it is boring, and some parts it's like, I just don't care. But certain parts inspired very good conversations with Dad, who loves history and watches all sorts of documentaries on this kind of thing, and he told me a lot of things that the book didn't tell me that makes it so much more interesting. It's not so much the book itself, but what I learned from talking about it... That probably doesn't make too The Ambleside Online schedule had me reading a ton per week, and it was A LOT. And some of it is boring, and some parts it's like, I just don't care. But certain parts inspired very good conversations with Dad, who loves history and watches all sorts of documentaries on this kind of thing, and he told me a lot of things that the book didn't tell me that makes it so much more interesting. It's not so much the book itself, but what I learned from talking about it... That probably doesn't make too much sense, but it made me like the book a little more.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    This was not nearly as interesting as the first three volumes, except for the fact that the history was much more recent. But Bauer unfortunately abandons her usual narrative style for a more matter-of-fact style. I'm glad I listened to this audio book along with the others, but I probably won't return to this volume as I do to the others.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

    I should probably edit my stars rating to 5 stars. When I asked Xander whether he liked it a lot, a little bit, or a medium amount, he said, "A LOT." "Like 5 out of 5 stars?" "Yes."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Ray

    When I first started homeschooling, I was really into The Story of the World. It was the first history that I used, unless you count Christian Liberty Press’s History for Little Pilgrims. If you go back into the archives of my blog into about 2012 and 2013, you will see that we did a great many activities and had fun as we read through the first two volumes of the story. We also read through volume three, but my children didn’t find volume three as compelling at the time, so I put volume four on When I first started homeschooling, I was really into The Story of the World. It was the first history that I used, unless you count Christian Liberty Press’s History for Little Pilgrims. If you go back into the archives of my blog into about 2012 and 2013, you will see that we did a great many activities and had fun as we read through the first two volumes of the story. We also read through volume three, but my children didn’t find volume three as compelling at the time, so I put volume four on my bookcase, thinking that perhaps one day we would work through it. Late this summer, as my oldest son, who is 12, and I were looking for independent work for him to do separate from our whole families’ schoolwork, he picked the fourth volume off the shelf of options for him to work through. So, I began working through The Story of the World (Volume 4): The Modern Age with him. It was his fall semester “study with Mom.” We would read 2 or 3 chapters a week and discuss the chapters, find places on the map and sometimes put events in our book of centuries. We kept it light and did not do any formal narration or writing with it, and we ended up really enjoying working through this volume of history. This volume, if you’re wondering about where it covers, begins during the reign of Queen Victoria and covers from Queen Victoria all the way to Nelson Mandela. The volume cuts off in the 1990s, which is interesting because, as we read about the First Persian Gulf war, I would explain to my son that I was actually his age when I watched the coverage of the war on CNN. (As a side note, how creepy is it to realize that we essentially watched that war on television?) I realized that events in my lifetime didn’t really feel like history to me, even though a few of them have truly passed into history. This volume is wide ranging, as Bauer attempts to cover events on all continents, and that makes it difficult to condense into a cohesive story. I think that, perhaps, is why the books lose their charm in the later volumes. It can be difficult to keep up with events in India or South America as you go through and visit them every couple of chapters, but in the end, I find that reading this volume deepens my perception of global history and how what is done in each part of the world effects the other parts, and that is huge when we begin to study the world wars and to understand modern events. Because of the complexity of the material and the difficulty in transitioning from one place to another and back again, I would not recommend this volume for children under 10. At twelve, Bennett was the perfect age to absorb and connect the information, but he wasn’t too old to be beyond the material. I do not know when or if I will use this book with my 11 year old, but I do plan to use this book again with at least one of my younger two during their middle school years. As always, I asked Bennett for his perspective on the whole book as we finished with it yesterday. He said: "I would give this book 4 stars. I really like how history plays out in the book, but a lot of bad stuff happens in modern history. It’s like we just get worse as time goes on". He definitely picks up on the note of pragmatism and despair that tinges Bauer’s own introduction to this volume of history. We have hope in the next revolution, but as we all carry the evil of sin in our hearts, a new government or revolution is often just a perpetrator of more violence and injustice against a new group. We really do practice perpetual war in the hopes of perpetual peace. Yet, peace cannot be made by us, and so the cycle goes on. In retrospect, this would have been a good history book to have paired with a Biblical study of the book of Judges, as modern history truly teaches us what happens when people do what is right in their own eyes. This is truly an excellent history volume, and its only truly negative is the difficulty incurred in trying to remember all the people groups and countries that she discusses from chapter to chapter. I would probably give it closer to 4.5 stars, except Goodreads doesn't let you rate in 1/2 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy Meyers

    I loved Bauer's first and second volumes and almost loved the third. As the volumes get older and more to modern times, I find them more fact-filled, and therefore not as memorable. In her concision and clarity, she loses some of the memorable beauty of story-telling in her latter two volumes. She does give that disclaimer about this book, and it's true. I also thought she came across a little bit too liberal politically for my taste: I'm not sure if she is liberal or if she was just trying to b I loved Bauer's first and second volumes and almost loved the third. As the volumes get older and more to modern times, I find them more fact-filled, and therefore not as memorable. In her concision and clarity, she loses some of the memorable beauty of story-telling in her latter two volumes. She does give that disclaimer about this book, and it's true. I also thought she came across a little bit too liberal politically for my taste: I'm not sure if she is liberal or if she was just trying to be objective. I bet the latter. Because for example, she DID include the horrors of the Holocaust, but then turned around, and came across way too sympathetic for the Palestinians in the establishment of a Jewish nation. Watch PragerU. Dennis Prager explains how there could be peace today with the Palestinians, but they don't want it. She also credits FDR for pulling the country out of the Depression, which may be how it seemed at the time, but Economics in One Lesson by Hazlitt says that you should consider the long-term effects of your economic decisions, and FDR more than probably any other president ruined our country with debt, bloated government, and the income tax!! She was a little weird about JFK, too, as if the country changed after his death. The country did change, for sure, after the 60s, but I thought it was strange to tie that to JFK's assassination? Anyway. She did a great job at helping to explain the whole Balkan mess and WW1. Unfortunately, I still can't remember why in the world there was a WW1!! I don't know of a better resource for kids, though, so this will still be our choice the next time around. I like all of the activity guide helps as well!! My boys will be done with this in October. They're reading on their own--immersion reading with the audio--and I listened to the audio ahead of them, so I knew what they were learning and I could learn as well. However, I often thought that I would have better retention if I read it myself rather than just listening.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    4 stars & 4/10 books. This is the best of the series. It has little “talking down to children,” it’s interesting, it’s humorous, it’s well-written, and it’s honest, but it’s not overwhelming. I was irritated by the attitude towards the British (making them sound stupid & nasty), but she did admit that the Americans messed up too. There were a couple times when she spelled “god” with a capital G when speaking of the Muslim & Sikh god. I enjoy reading this book and read it for pleasure.  A Favourit 4 stars & 4/10 books. This is the best of the series. It has little “talking down to children,” it’s interesting, it’s humorous, it’s well-written, and it’s honest, but it’s not overwhelming. I was irritated by the attitude towards the British (making them sound stupid & nasty), but she did admit that the Americans messed up too. There were a couple times when she spelled “god” with a capital G when speaking of the Muslim & Sikh god. I enjoy reading this book and read it for pleasure.  A Favourite Humorous Quote: “[The Japanese army] offered to smuggle [the dethroned Chinese emperor]  into Manchuria [where] he could become the emperor of a Japanese Empire in China, called Manchukuo. Puyi accepted[, so the officers put him on a ship, landed him in Manchuria, and] immediately announced that Puyi would be the Chief Executive off the new country Manchukuo. “Nobody was particularly happy about this. The Chinese said that Manchukuo was an unreal country, a fairy tale, and that Puyi was a traitor. Puyi was indignant, because he had thought he would be made emperor. “Chief Executive” was not nearly as interesting a job. The Japanese government in Tokyo was unhappy with the army’s actions—but was afraid of too much resistance…. China appealed to the League of Nations. The League of Nations, after hearing the whole story[,] announced that Japan was at fault, and should withdraw from China. Instead, Japan simply left the League of Nations. But both Italy and Germany (neither of which was very fond of the League of Nations) agreed to recognize the new country of Manchukuo as a real nation.”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lori Scheffler

    I find it very difficult to pick a star rating. I loved using this as the basis for our homeschool history curriculum. Its breadth is laudable and nearly every day I said to myself, "Why didn't I learn this in school?!" There is so much covered and we loved diving into the topics that intrigued us the most. Therein lies my rub. We found inaccuracies when we dug. The biggest I found was in reference to Nikita Khruschev where the author combined two incidents separated by 4 years into one incident I find it very difficult to pick a star rating. I loved using this as the basis for our homeschool history curriculum. Its breadth is laudable and nearly every day I said to myself, "Why didn't I learn this in school?!" There is so much covered and we loved diving into the topics that intrigued us the most. Therein lies my rub. We found inaccuracies when we dug. The biggest I found was in reference to Nikita Khruschev where the author combined two incidents separated by 4 years into one incident rendering them both innacurate. In an earlier volume I had noticed another inaccuracy after diving deeper on our own so this second one caused me to question her sources. That's when I realized there are no bibliography or references listed anywhere. Normally I would say this omission is unforgivable in a history text. However, it must not be, because I plan to continue to use this text to study history with my younger kids in years to come, just taking it with a grain of salt.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

    Susan Wise Bauer concluded her series excellently. Though the content in this fourth volume seems to be nothing other than war after war, she does a great job of explaining many of the details and background leading up to these political and military eruptions. As usual, for the audio Jim Weiss was an excellent narrator for the book. There is something comforting about his voice even - strangely enough - when he's reading about war. It was a good series, and a great conclusion. I look forward to w Susan Wise Bauer concluded her series excellently. Though the content in this fourth volume seems to be nothing other than war after war, she does a great job of explaining many of the details and background leading up to these political and military eruptions. As usual, for the audio Jim Weiss was an excellent narrator for the book. There is something comforting about his voice even - strangely enough - when he's reading about war. It was a good series, and a great conclusion. I look forward to when there's been enough passage of time for her to write even a fifth volume, if our Lord tarries and so wills.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lee Leslie

    We've read this whole series aloud with the kids as part of homeschooling, and it's a much more global perspective on history than I was exposed to as a public school kid in the '80s and '90s. However, there are some real missteps, and I felt it was always important to supplement with things like Howard Zinn. The most egregious example I can remember is that the author goes out of her way to talk about Robert E. Lee's opposition to slavery during one of the Civil War chapters — which is complete We've read this whole series aloud with the kids as part of homeschooling, and it's a much more global perspective on history than I was exposed to as a public school kid in the '80s and '90s. However, there are some real missteps, and I felt it was always important to supplement with things like Howard Zinn. The most egregious example I can remember is that the author goes out of her way to talk about Robert E. Lee's opposition to slavery during one of the Civil War chapters — which is completely baffling until you read that she's from Virginia.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This is the 4th book of the 4-volume series. I loved them all and purchased the 4 book set to read again and use for future reference. Ms. Bauer has a great talent for portraying history (a subject I loathed as a child) in an interesting and informative manner. I would highly recommend to anyone (young and old) who would like to learn about some of the world's most significant historical moments.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dedra ~ A Book Wanderer

    I was actually sad to be finishing the final Story of the World with my youngest son. We've enjoyed all the books, especially studying history chronologically. I think these books are great jumping off points. We always add to our study of history by reading historical fiction that coincides with what we're studying, which helps to bring it down to a more personal level.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    Not as story-like as the other volumes (which is why i gave it four stars instead of five) but EXCELLENT as a history spine for elementary students. Does a great job of connecting all the different events of history in one understandable narrative.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I still appreciate the world view of history that is presented. I think certain events could have been expanded on and others eliminated, though.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    Recommended for 4th grade and up although my 7 and 9 year olds both enjoyed the audio book. I listened with them and checked in often after the warning.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mariah H

    Very well written. Very easy to understand. I highly recommend for children.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Read aloud for 2019/2020 school year

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Simple overview of world events starting with Victoria's reign and ending with Nelson Mandela.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shama Farag

    I'm not entirely done reading the book, but here are a few of my concerns: 1- The book is biased, no matter how hard she tried to tell the full story. 2- I'm pissed at how she justified the American greed to steal other countries' wealth and fortunes by saying, Americans empathized with the revolutionaries, and they wanted people to have their freedom. 3- dedicating a full chapter describing the Muslim Sultan Abdulhamid as THE RED Sultan because he started an ethnic genocide, and killed the Armenia I'm not entirely done reading the book, but here are a few of my concerns: 1- The book is biased, no matter how hard she tried to tell the full story. 2- I'm pissed at how she justified the American greed to steal other countries' wealth and fortunes by saying, Americans empathized with the revolutionaries, and they wanted people to have their freedom. 3- dedicating a full chapter describing the Muslim Sultan Abdulhamid as THE RED Sultan because he started an ethnic genocide, and killed the Armenian Christian traitors who helped Russians to kick him out of his reign, was somewhat fair. But, choosing not to mention a word about the Spanish Inquisitions because its kinda "Inappropriate" for an eight years old kid is totally freaking me out and totally not fair for the Muslim American community who always have the fingers pointed to them with a bad history.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Gillespie

    This year in school we are covering the 1900s, so we listened to Susan Wise Bauer’s exceptional The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child, Volume 4: The Modern Age: From Victoria’s Empire to the End of the USSR on audio while we were taking a road trip and driving around town doing errands. I know I keep saying this, but this four volume audio set is without a doubt one of the top five things I have ever purchased for the kids. I’m so glad that we own it! The kids have listened to This year in school we are covering the 1900s, so we listened to Susan Wise Bauer’s exceptional The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child, Volume 4: The Modern Age: From Victoria’s Empire to the End of the USSR on audio while we were taking a road trip and driving around town doing errands. I know I keep saying this, but this four volume audio set is without a doubt one of the top five things I have ever purchased for the kids. I’m so glad that we own it! The kids have listened to these books so many times and we continue to get a lot out of them (practical note: take it from me and rip these CDs to your iTunes BEFORE you give them to the kids!). What I love about this series is it’s ability to present history as a story, with events tying in to previous eras and different parts of the globe. It’s not a Western-centric series, although Western history is of course covered. You also learn how what was going on in other parts of the world influenced and was influenced by things happening in Europe and America. I’ve seen Volume 4 described as not being for younger elementary kids but honestly I’m not sure why. Although the 20th century was full of terrible things, so were other centuries. This book does a great job of removing details that might disturb small children without shying away from the evil perpetrated by Hitler, Stalin, Mao, etc. I have no problem with small kids hearing this book. You could do Story of the World as a read-aloud, but I’ve been glad to have it as a high quality audio book (Jim Weiss reads well). Read more reviews of books for kids--and adults--on A Spirited Mind.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Madilyn

    8Y, Review 8, 512 pages If you ever wanted to learn about world history in a way that’s more interesting than lectures, then I’d recommend The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child: The Modern Age: From Victoria's Empire to the End of the USSR, written by Susan Wise Bauer. There’s a lot of information in each chapter of the novel. While not indeed perfect, it is a great novel with which to learn more about history (you should probably read the other books in this series if you want 8Y, Review 8, 512 pages If you ever wanted to learn about world history in a way that’s more interesting than lectures, then I’d recommend The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child: The Modern Age: From Victoria's Empire to the End of the USSR, written by Susan Wise Bauer. There’s a lot of information in each chapter of the novel. While not indeed perfect, it is a great novel with which to learn more about history (you should probably read the other books in this series if you want chronologically history first). One of the effective literary devices is the imagery. In addition to maps, there’s interesting descriptions too. For example, on one page, it says, “Anyway, this land that the Boers had claimed didn’t seem to be very valuable. It was dry and rocky.” Another effective literary element in this book is amplification. This book often extends a sentence to add more information in that one sentence. For example, on another page, it says, “He wanted the land in Russia to be used by the whole nation—the whole “community”—not just the rich.” Actually, this literary device is used rather frequently in the book. It helps the reader be able to gather more information about history in general. Overall, I like this book. Through the descriptions and amplifications, you get more detail about events in history. I'd recommend this book if you are 10 or above, due to the events that occur in this book. Some of the events aren't suitable for those that are under 10 years old. For the other books in the series, though, it can be for younger audiences.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kyumin Lee

    The history from 1821 to 2001 is full of corruption and people fighting back oppressive governments. When people think that a government isn't acting appropriately, they rebel and fight back. A good example of this is Mexico around 1900. The president of Mexico, Porfirio Díaz, had run for 30 years, which was defying their constitution. The constitution stated that any president could only hold office for four years. Díaz abused his power and didn't allow anyone to run against him. Whenever someo The history from 1821 to 2001 is full of corruption and people fighting back oppressive governments. When people think that a government isn't acting appropriately, they rebel and fight back. A good example of this is Mexico around 1900. The president of Mexico, Porfirio Díaz, had run for 30 years, which was defying their constitution. The constitution stated that any president could only hold office for four years. Díaz abused his power and didn't allow anyone to run against him. Whenever someone came up with the idea, Díaz's supporters scared them out of it. After 40 years of this persecution, Díaz allowed a man named Francisco Madero to run against him. But when it came time for the election, Díaz rigged the election and said that Mexico had voted for him again. Madero brought up an army of rebels and started fighting back. "All over Mexico, rebels were fighting against government forces, taking over villages, and driving away government officials. The Mexican Revolution was in full swing. Soon, Porfirio Díaz realized that he would not be able to hold on to power very much longer(214)." After years of persistence and fighting back, Mexico was able to remove corrupt leaders from power and start fresh with a new leader.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stefani

    No history text is going to be perfect. But this one is very good. I have now listened to or read nearly all of the four volumes of this Story of the World series. (This one, I did read cover to cover.) I feel this history series accomplishes its goal: to create a story of the world. The stories are told in chronological order as well as can be (obviously, events often take up long periods of time, so there is overlap, but on a whole, the story moves the reader forward through time). There is a No history text is going to be perfect. But this one is very good. I have now listened to or read nearly all of the four volumes of this Story of the World series. (This one, I did read cover to cover.) I feel this history series accomplishes its goal: to create a story of the world. The stories are told in chronological order as well as can be (obviously, events often take up long periods of time, so there is overlap, but on a whole, the story moves the reader forward through time). There is a western civilization focus (though plenty is covered about other cultures and countries), but as a classical home educator, this did not deter my decision to use this text. There are a couple religious chapters (yes, there's one on Jesus--whether you believe in him, or his claim as the Son of God, his teachings obviously have had a large impact on our Western Civilization), but those can be easily omitted if desired. But truly, Volume 1 begins with cavemen! So, I think she really did try to balance so much within world history and western civilization, and I think that she succeeded. An excellent resource for home schoolers.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Unfortunately, I've survived to adulthood with an embarrassing lack of historical knowledge. Not even my liberal arts general education university classes taught me history. Now that I'm homeschooling, I needed at least a basic understanding. THIS BOOK HAS BEEN FANTASTIC FOR THAT PURPOSE. I obviously can't assess its accuracy, but my husband and I have thoroughly enjoyed the overview of all of world history and the way Bauer offers perspective and some repetition. We talk about the books frequen Unfortunately, I've survived to adulthood with an embarrassing lack of historical knowledge. Not even my liberal arts general education university classes taught me history. Now that I'm homeschooling, I needed at least a basic understanding. THIS BOOK HAS BEEN FANTASTIC FOR THAT PURPOSE. I obviously can't assess its accuracy, but my husband and I have thoroughly enjoyed the overview of all of world history and the way Bauer offers perspective and some repetition. We talk about the books frequently, and I'm thrilled that basic pieces of history, tiny little references from daily life, are finally substantive for me. I really needed an historical framework or overview, and this simple, engaging book has been ideal for that purpose. Now, when I read other specific books, I have a context to fit them into and a way to mentally file the information. I'm excited to share this series with my son when he's ready. Actually, with all the discussion between my husband and me, he's learning and hearing a lot of it already.

  26. 5 out of 5

    The other John

    The conclusion of The Story of the World takes us from 1850 to 1994, with a brief mention of September 11th, 2001 in an afterword. The reason Ms. Bauer stops short is that the big events of the 21st Century are essentially current events, not historical ones which folks can look at with a full perspective. I suppose that's why my history books in school never went past the Vietnam War. (Not that it mattered, we were always behind at the end of the year and never made it to the 1960s.) Anyway, Mo The conclusion of The Story of the World takes us from 1850 to 1994, with a brief mention of September 11th, 2001 in an afterword. The reason Ms. Bauer stops short is that the big events of the 21st Century are essentially current events, not historical ones which folks can look at with a full perspective. I suppose that's why my history books in school never went past the Vietnam War. (Not that it mattered, we were always behind at the end of the year and never made it to the 1960s.) Anyway, Modern Age is true to form, presenting historical events as a story. It was interesting that the further I got into the book, and hence the more familiar I was with the historical events described, the more critical I got. But this is a book for kids after all and one should expect a certain degree of simplicity. So check it out.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karen L.

    This book is absolutely wonderful. It makes history very interesting and accessible to a wide variety of ages, reading like a story, NOT a text. I love how it connects history all over the world. It explains clear the British Empire, and the nations under Britain and their quest for independence. I have been peeking ahead and read on J.F.K's assassination, of which I saw, as a little one on television (I'm one of those who had nightmares after that!). The author beautifully tells that story. Wh This book is absolutely wonderful. It makes history very interesting and accessible to a wide variety of ages, reading like a story, NOT a text. I love how it connects history all over the world. It explains clear the British Empire, and the nations under Britain and their quest for independence. I have been peeking ahead and read on J.F.K's assassination, of which I saw, as a little one on television (I'm one of those who had nightmares after that!). The author beautifully tells that story. What does it say about me that I get so much out of a kids history book? It is advertised for ages 6 & up, but I think you'd have to have an incredible 6 year old to appreciate this book. The history would be a bit too mature for a 6 year old. It is a book that you can pick up at whatever part of the Modern age you are interested and read. That is basically how I read it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Selina

    Surprise, I really enjoyed this book, not being too much of a history buff myself, probably because there seems so much bias among history, plus, one has to pick and choose which parts of history and there are way too many books in the library for that. This book gives mostly the political and social history of the world in little chapters in a narrative, with each part relating or following on from the other. So no boring lists of facts or text trivia boxes! Even though it is written for kids I Surprise, I really enjoyed this book, not being too much of a history buff myself, probably because there seems so much bias among history, plus, one has to pick and choose which parts of history and there are way too many books in the library for that. This book gives mostly the political and social history of the world in little chapters in a narrative, with each part relating or following on from the other. So no boring lists of facts or text trivia boxes! Even though it is written for kids I don't mind it, as I learned so much about the world in a single book I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it. Although much of it is horrible, its not written in the overly humorous/gruesome manner of Horrible Histories series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    I've read all four volumes and found this one to be the most frustrating due to the lack of neutrality in the writing information. This volume wasn't written in a story form like the other volumes and the writing is a bit choppy, but this isn't what I had a problem with. This book has a disclaimer in the beginning that it's for older students so I was expecting more facts, but found the book to be more biased and included more misleading information than the other three. (there were a few mislea I've read all four volumes and found this one to be the most frustrating due to the lack of neutrality in the writing information. This volume wasn't written in a story form like the other volumes and the writing is a bit choppy, but this isn't what I had a problem with. This book has a disclaimer in the beginning that it's for older students so I was expecting more facts, but found the book to be more biased and included more misleading information than the other three. (there were a few misleading or absolute falsehoods in the others as well, but perhaps not as glaringly obvious?) If you don't have time to do more research I'd suggest bypassing this volume or to take it with many grains of salt.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Disappointing compared to the previous three books in the series. The book attempts to cover far more information than any 4th-8th grader needs to know about modern history. It would have been much better if Bauer had selected the main events and themes of 20th century history and focused on them instead of trying to cover so many details. That's what I'm looking for in an elementary textbook. I also found the lack of storytelling made for pretty dry reading. Bauer says in the introduction that Disappointing compared to the previous three books in the series. The book attempts to cover far more information than any 4th-8th grader needs to know about modern history. It would have been much better if Bauer had selected the main events and themes of 20th century history and focused on them instead of trying to cover so many details. That's what I'm looking for in an elementary textbook. I also found the lack of storytelling made for pretty dry reading. Bauer says in the introduction that it just wasn't possible to use the style of the earlier books because of the violent events of the 20th century. Perhaps then these events just don't need to be studied by young children. I might use this as a reference book, but not again as a main text.

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