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David Kenyon Webster's memoir is a clear-eyed, emotionally charged chronicle of youth, camaraderie, and the chaos of war. Relying on his own letters home and recollections he penned just after his discharge, Webster gives a first hand account of life in E Company, 101st Airborne Division, crafting a memoir that resonates with the immediacy of a gripping novel. From the bea David Kenyon Webster's memoir is a clear-eyed, emotionally charged chronicle of youth, camaraderie, and the chaos of war. Relying on his own letters home and recollections he penned just after his discharge, Webster gives a first hand account of life in E Company, 101st Airborne Division, crafting a memoir that resonates with the immediacy of a gripping novel. From the beaches of Normandy to the blood-dimmed battlefields of Holland, here are acts of courage and cowardice, moments of irritating boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror, and pitched urban warfare. Offering a remarkable snapshot of what it was like to enter Germany in the last days of World War II, Webster presents a vivid, varied cast of young paratroopers from all walks of life, and unforgettable glimpses of enemy soldiers and hapless civilians caught up in the melee. Parachute Infantry is at once harsh and moving, boisterous and tragic, and stands today as an unsurpassed chronicle of war--how men fight it, survive it, and remember it.


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David Kenyon Webster's memoir is a clear-eyed, emotionally charged chronicle of youth, camaraderie, and the chaos of war. Relying on his own letters home and recollections he penned just after his discharge, Webster gives a first hand account of life in E Company, 101st Airborne Division, crafting a memoir that resonates with the immediacy of a gripping novel. From the bea David Kenyon Webster's memoir is a clear-eyed, emotionally charged chronicle of youth, camaraderie, and the chaos of war. Relying on his own letters home and recollections he penned just after his discharge, Webster gives a first hand account of life in E Company, 101st Airborne Division, crafting a memoir that resonates with the immediacy of a gripping novel. From the beaches of Normandy to the blood-dimmed battlefields of Holland, here are acts of courage and cowardice, moments of irritating boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror, and pitched urban warfare. Offering a remarkable snapshot of what it was like to enter Germany in the last days of World War II, Webster presents a vivid, varied cast of young paratroopers from all walks of life, and unforgettable glimpses of enemy soldiers and hapless civilians caught up in the melee. Parachute Infantry is at once harsh and moving, boisterous and tragic, and stands today as an unsurpassed chronicle of war--how men fight it, survive it, and remember it.

30 review for Parachute Infantry: An American Paratrooper's Memoir of D-Day and the Fall of the Third Reich

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dachokie

    Band of Brothers ... before Ambrose and Hollywood Intervened ..., December 22, 2010 Ever since HBO glorified this group of men, I have made it a point ... well, now it's a mission, to read any/all of the books associated with Easy Company. Reading Ambrose's book prior to the release of the HBO miniseries served as an appetizer to the main course (the 10 part series), but there was still plenty of room left for desert as I was hungry for more information about these men, their upbringing, their bo Band of Brothers ... before Ambrose and Hollywood Intervened ..., December 22, 2010 Ever since HBO glorified this group of men, I have made it a point ... well, now it's a mission, to read any/all of the books associated with Easy Company. Reading Ambrose's book prior to the release of the HBO miniseries served as an appetizer to the main course (the 10 part series), but there was still plenty of room left for desert as I was hungry for more information about these men, their upbringing, their bond, their deeds and their lives after their service. My mission has been blessed with a virtual avalanche of books that have contributed to satisfying my craving for "all things Easy Company", but they are all products of the Band of Brother's cash cow and perhaps a scant indulgent. Ironically, it was actually the debut of HBO's "The Pacific" which led me to David Kenyon Webster's book. Just like E.B. Sledge's "With the Old Breed" and Robert Leckie's "Helmet for My Pillow" provided the foundation for "the Pacific", "Parachute Infantry" serves as the raw material needed for "Band of Brothers". In his book, Webster authors a genuine, personal and detailed look at Easy Company almost four decades before Ambrose gave these men a global introduction. The pleasant surprise with this book is that it provides so much more than the miniseries could have hoped to deliver. What makes Webster's book a worthy read is that he wrote it decades before Ambrose even considered writing about a company from the 506 Division (it was actually Ambrose who initiated the memoir actually being published) ... in other words, "Parachute Infantry" is arguably the original manuscript for the Band of Brothers book and miniseries. And Webster delivers a wonderfully detailed account of his wartime experience, the military life he absolutely hated and a war that left an indelible imprint on his life. A constant theme throughout the memoir is the author's utter disdain for the military and all of its pettiness and ineptitude. Additionally, Webster displays a similar distaste toward the French, their arrogance and unappreciative, elitist nature. It becomes obvious from the beginning of the book that David Webster clearly viewed military life beneath him. Webster articulates his experiences and opinions in a dry, witty manner and illustrates them with great detail. The reader never experiences moments where more information is desired. One of the more surprising aspects of "Parachute Infantry" is that the individuals made popular by Ambrose and the HBO miniseries are, for the most part, absent. Most of the individuals close to Webster are mostly fringe characters in the miniseries. But, it is obvious, that he felt a kinship to many of the men who shared his experience. If anything, Webster's book is reminiscent of Robert Leckie's "Helmet for My Pillow" in that the focus of the book is more of personal reflection of military life, bonding and the deep impact of what is being witnessed rather than a pure combat memoir. It is not that Webster didn't see combat (he was wounded in Holland and earned a Bronze Star), but his focus is less on the actual battles as it is on the indelible affect their aftermath had on him. "Parachute Infantry" starts out slow and can be somewhat verbose initially, creating a somewhat tedious read. However, as the book progresses, Webster's attention to detail becomes more appreciated and enjoyable to read. His keen eye for specifics is evident as the reader is immersed in a lush and colorful environment on each point of Webster's journey through Europe; this attention to minutia adds to the reader's experience. In my opinion, one of the best segments of the miniseries is the final episode when the war draws to a close and the men of Easy Company take Hitler's Eagle's Nest in Berchtesgaden, Germany and eventually report to Austria. This particular episode is where I believe "Parachute Infantry" really shines and it becomes clear that the miniseries drew heavily from Webster's account as the description he provides of these two locales is just as breathtaking to read about as it is viewed on television. His recollection of spending the end of the war in Austria reads a lot like a military version of a Jack Kerouac adventure. It is a shame that David Webster was never able to see the impact or importance of his book. After reading his work, though, it becomes obvious that military service was only a small (but significant) facet of the man's life; maybe even a necessary interruption. And, like many gifted writers, he chose to view his experience as an adventure. Rather than leaning on his family's wealth to garner favoritism and avoid hazardous duty, David Webster opted to enter the military as private to see this adventure from the ground up as a low level enlisted man. The perspective he provides the reader of the Band of Brothers is both eloquent and unique.

  2. 5 out of 5

    JD

    Great book about the daily life in E Company, 506 PIR during World War 2. The book came before "Band of Brothers" and was written shortly after the war which separates it from all the other E Company memoirs. Webster was not a "gung-ho" soldier and did not volunteer for assignments, but reading the book you can see he was still a good, duty bound soldier that survived the War, and the Army. He does not make war glamourous and there is not a lot of description of the actions he was involved in, b Great book about the daily life in E Company, 506 PIR during World War 2. The book came before "Band of Brothers" and was written shortly after the war which separates it from all the other E Company memoirs. Webster was not a "gung-ho" soldier and did not volunteer for assignments, but reading the book you can see he was still a good, duty bound soldier that survived the War, and the Army. He does not make war glamourous and there is not a lot of description of the actions he was involved in, but just takes you into the mind of the average soldier. Great book and highly recommended to all E Company followers.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Meirav Rath

    Aah, Webster, how I love thee and thine writing style. If you want to clean your head from the Spanks cheesy American kitsch about perfect hero soldiers, Parachute Infantry is the right book for you. Webster's eye misses nothing and his writing shies away from no cock up, no chicken shit behavior and no silly soldierly mischief. It's a wonderful introduction to David K. Webster and his wonderful style of writing as well as a personal testimony of an American paratrooper in the second world war.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abby Jones

    This was a very interesting, boots on the ground, type book. Web is cynical and doesn't pull any punches about his feelings about the army. He's a good writer, and you will see many recognizable names and characters from Band of Brothers, but there are also a lot of holes filled in that the show just couldn't cover. You will also see how each of the characters in the show served more as an archtype than stuck point for point with their real life character. I wonder what Web would have thought of This was a very interesting, boots on the ground, type book. Web is cynical and doesn't pull any punches about his feelings about the army. He's a good writer, and you will see many recognizable names and characters from Band of Brothers, but there are also a lot of holes filled in that the show just couldn't cover. You will also see how each of the characters in the show served more as an archtype than stuck point for point with their real life character. I wonder what Web would have thought of the show. One of the interesting parts was reading the letters he wrote to his family that are included at the end of the book. They showed that he wasn't as cynical towards the army as he was in the book, that the tone came towards the middle to the end of the war, and understandably. Going from the semi freedom of the war to the more strict marching orders of peace time accupation would grate on guys who had risked their lives, and watched their friends die. I do recommend this book for any WW2 buff and Band of Brothers buff. Enjoy. Rated: PG-13: realities of young men at war.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chad Simons

    Sometimes cynical, sometimes company man, Webster pens quite a report on his experiences as one of the Band of Brothers. I have read a lot of these books, memoirs, and stories from 101st Airborne men from WWII. I have the utmost respect for them and their experiences. Most of the stories are inspiring, amazing, saddening, etc. I can not even begin to understand what these men went through. Websters account takes away all of the bravado, all of the praise, and all of the fluff. He tells a real st Sometimes cynical, sometimes company man, Webster pens quite a report on his experiences as one of the Band of Brothers. I have read a lot of these books, memoirs, and stories from 101st Airborne men from WWII. I have the utmost respect for them and their experiences. Most of the stories are inspiring, amazing, saddening, etc. I can not even begin to understand what these men went through. Websters account takes away all of the bravado, all of the praise, and all of the fluff. He tells a real story from his point of view, and does not hesitate to offer his opinion of fellow soldiers, squad leaders, platoon leaders, generals, German soldiers, German citizens, France, Frenchmen and women, etc etc etc. The movie portrayal of Webster in the classic series leaves the viewer with a mixed feeling. You wonder if he was a part of the group or not. You wonder if he had the same dedication to the group or not. This account answers those questions for me. There are stories here not included in the mini series and not included in other books I have read. More names of fellow soldiers that have been left out of the other tales. A different perspective to many of the events already described. All coupled with a written recollection of the inner voice of Webster himself. Almost like he was journaling the entire time. The fact that Webster went out sailing and never was heard from again seems a fitting end to this hero's life. I don't mean that as disrespectful, but more like something that he planned out and happened just the way he wanted it to. And I love that he loved sharks. Not that I love sharks, but the obscure interest from a soldier of WWII just seems to go right along with the mysterious person that Webster makes himself out to be.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Frederick

    This was a first-hand account of World War Two written by one of the men featured in the book and movie 'Band of Brothers'. He died long before that book was written, disappearing along with his boat in the Pacific in the early 1960s. However, his account has some unique qualities about it. He was cynical, Harvard educated, and very intelligent. And yet, he was one of those tough paratroopers who landed at D-Day. Its a very good account if you are a student of World War II. I strongly recommend This was a first-hand account of World War Two written by one of the men featured in the book and movie 'Band of Brothers'. He died long before that book was written, disappearing along with his boat in the Pacific in the early 1960s. However, his account has some unique qualities about it. He was cynical, Harvard educated, and very intelligent. And yet, he was one of those tough paratroopers who landed at D-Day. Its a very good account if you are a student of World War II. I strongly recommend it if you can get past the contrived conversations that are in all of these first-hand accounts for we know that the details of conversations are not always remembered as they happened and memories are not 100% accurate. Its important, though, in reading these memoirs, as I have read several, to get the feel and the emotions of war on the citizen-soldier, the one who leaves civilian life to do something heroic and then returns if still alive.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angela Hunt

    Though I had seen it before, in 2019, in a burst of patriotic fervor, I decided to watch the entire BAND OF BROTHERS series again. The early episodes are a bit confusing--a lot of characters, and they are hard to tell apart when they're all wearing identical jump suits and helmets. So when I had finished the series, I watched it again, mostly to appreciate the growth of the many different characters. I was taken by Webster (David Kenyon Webster), who became a writer after the war. His book, PARA Though I had seen it before, in 2019, in a burst of patriotic fervor, I decided to watch the entire BAND OF BROTHERS series again. The early episodes are a bit confusing--a lot of characters, and they are hard to tell apart when they're all wearing identical jump suits and helmets. So when I had finished the series, I watched it again, mostly to appreciate the growth of the many different characters. I was taken by Webster (David Kenyon Webster), who became a writer after the war. His book, PARACHUTE INFANTRY was not published in his short lifetime, but his wife saw that it was published after his death. I delighed to discover scenes and events in the book that were also in the TV series. Very well written, with little details that would prove useful for anyone writing about World War II and paratroopers. All in all, I was moved by the stories of these brave men and the sacrifices they made for their country. I wish they'd been a little more noble after the war (drinking, looting, and having sex out of boredom--ugh), but after the war, I'm sure they wanted to celebrate the fact that they made it through alive. If you like true war stories, this one is for you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan Walsh

    This is a must-read for Band of Brother fans. David Webster is actually one of the main true-life characters featured in the HBO WW2 series. Since it's a memoir, at times it gets a little laborious to read (skipped several parts because of this), but the perspective he shares is so unique and authentic, I still really enjoyed this book. You can see many of the scenes depicted in the series as you read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sanna

    Interesting book. Offers a different view on the story of the famous paratroopers that are best known as the Band of Brothers. Webster wrote his story between the war and his death in 1961 so he never got any part of the fame the HBO series earned him and his fellow soldiers. Having read other novels about Easy Company men and seen the tv series several times (thanks to my hubby who is an avid fan), I have to say that Webster's novel is the most realistic one; a very rough, down to earth tale of Interesting book. Offers a different view on the story of the famous paratroopers that are best known as the Band of Brothers. Webster wrote his story between the war and his death in 1961 so he never got any part of the fame the HBO series earned him and his fellow soldiers. Having read other novels about Easy Company men and seen the tv series several times (thanks to my hubby who is an avid fan), I have to say that Webster's novel is the most realistic one; a very rough, down to earth tale of one man and his role in a huge chain of events on the European front. Naturally this book was written without the influence of BoB and that only adds to the value of it. Webster focuses on the everyday life of a soldier; the chickenshit, the constant hurry to wait etc. His depiction of actual battle events is realistic and thus very different than those from Hollywood. He emphasizes the fact that high morale and idealism aren't very much valued during war. He has mixed feelings about German soldiers as well as civilians he encounters; while they're the enemy and partly all responsible for horrible war crimes, he still sees them as people too, and feels (momentarily) bad for making them suffer when following orders. His hate for the army and love for his comrades is evident and present throughout the novel. Included are some of his letters home, which make an interesting addition to the novel and add to the authenticity of it all.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This is the WWII memoir of David Webster, who served with the 101st Airborne (with the famous Easy Company; he was a major character in the TV series "Band of Brothers"). It is a very different memoir than you usually see from veterans. Webster hated the army. He loved his unit, and served well, but he loathed most officers, hated saluting, and though that dug down into a ditch was the best way to spend your time under fire. In short, this is a memoir by someone who was willing to say what I imag This is the WWII memoir of David Webster, who served with the 101st Airborne (with the famous Easy Company; he was a major character in the TV series "Band of Brothers"). It is a very different memoir than you usually see from veterans. Webster hated the army. He loved his unit, and served well, but he loathed most officers, hated saluting, and though that dug down into a ditch was the best way to spend your time under fire. In short, this is a memoir by someone who was willing to say what I imagine most of his comrades were thinking. If you're familiar with "Band of Brothers," you will easily be able to place plot points. It's nothing ground-breaking, but very well written, and he has a unique tone (frankly, he comes off as a whiny prick in some of his stories). A good read, especially for anyone interested in a new perspective on Easy Company.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Danny Shelton

    One of the largest supplements to Stephen Ambrose's book Band of Brothers is this hidden gem. It was relatively unknown before Ambrose published his book, but is now getting well deserved publicity. It is the personal war narrative of David Webster from boot camp all the way through to the occupation of Austria. A well read and educated soldier, he attended Harvard before the war but dropped out to serve. Webster goes through all the events in detail and gives a rare 1st person accounts of the w One of the largest supplements to Stephen Ambrose's book Band of Brothers is this hidden gem. It was relatively unknown before Ambrose published his book, but is now getting well deserved publicity. It is the personal war narrative of David Webster from boot camp all the way through to the occupation of Austria. A well read and educated soldier, he attended Harvard before the war but dropped out to serve. Webster goes through all the events in detail and gives a rare 1st person accounts of the war, making no secret about his disdain for all things military and warlike along the way. Unfortunately Webster died a few years after the war, robbing the man of a bright future and the world of an excellent body of work.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    It seems a bit harsh to rate a memoir as only 2/5 but I found this one disjointed and quite dull in parts.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ciara

    ๐™‹๐™–๐™ง๐™–๐™˜๐™๐™ช๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™›๐™–๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ฎ - ๐˜ฟ๐™–๐™ซ๐™ž๐™™ ๐™†๐™š๐™ฃ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™’๐™š๐™—๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง โ€ข Was there any meaning to life or to war, that two men should sit together and jump within seconds of each other and yet never meet on the ground below? โ€ข One of my favourite tv shows right now is Band of Brothers. A HBO production about Easy Company in World War Two. One of the key characters portrayed in Band of Brothers is David Kenyon Webster. David Kenyon Webster was originally from New York in America. Webster fought with both Headquarters (Normandy ๐™‹๐™–๐™ง๐™–๐™˜๐™๐™ช๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™›๐™–๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ฎ - ๐˜ฟ๐™–๐™ซ๐™ž๐™™ ๐™†๐™š๐™ฃ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™’๐™š๐™—๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง โ€ข Was there any meaning to life or to war, that two men should sit together and jump within seconds of each other and yet never meet on the ground below? โ€ข One of my favourite tv shows right now is Band of Brothers. A HBO production about Easy Company in World War Two. One of the key characters portrayed in Band of Brothers is David Kenyon Webster. David Kenyon Webster was originally from New York in America. Webster fought with both Headquarters (Normandy) and Easy (rest of the war) Company. He fought in Normandy, Holland and witnessed Germany in the last days of World War Two from Berchtesgaden and then Zell Am See in Austria. David Kenyon Webster studied literature at Harvard university so I expected this book to be well written but it definitely exceed my expectations. It was amazingly written. Websterโ€™s book is gutsy, occasionally angry, occasionally bemused, moving, boisterous and tragic memoir about his and his comrades experiences in World War Two. It showed the horror that the men saw and evokes life in a battle that he personally fought. David Kenyon Webster died in 1961 when he went missing in a boating accident while shark fishing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    I had anticipated reading this book for a few months now. Webster was one of my favorites in the mini-series "Band of Brothers," so I was anxious to hear his experiences and personal thoughts on war. Webster's memoir takes quite a different tone from the other books I've read by or about Easy Company members. Webster's view on war and how he talked of it was brutally honest. His view on the army was probably quite an unpopular opinion. But, he told the bitter truth; about the horrors that he had I had anticipated reading this book for a few months now. Webster was one of my favorites in the mini-series "Band of Brothers," so I was anxious to hear his experiences and personal thoughts on war. Webster's memoir takes quite a different tone from the other books I've read by or about Easy Company members. Webster's view on war and how he talked of it was brutally honest. His view on the army was probably quite an unpopular opinion. But, he told the bitter truth; about the horrors that he had seen during his time in the Airborne, and the atrocities he witnessed. I liked the insight into war that David Kenyon Webster gives in his memoir. While not my favorite that I've read of the books I've found on the members of Easy Company, definitely one that you'll want to read if you're into WWII history, or "Band of Brothers." Almost like a missing puzzle piece. *There is a ton of foul language in this book, and one part when he describes something sexual, that happened to another member of the Regiment. *

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elfear

    It's a pity this was never published while he was still alive. I think it would have made better sales than that book on sharks... But I guess the world wasn't ready to hear what real soldiering was like, the blood and the boredom and the chickenshit. Great writing. Gained some perspective from a left-leaning highly educated man who had a love-hate relationship with combat life, but completely detested non-combat soldiering. He was bitter drunkard. He loved the outdoors and especially the water. It's a pity this was never published while he was still alive. I think it would have made better sales than that book on sharks... But I guess the world wasn't ready to hear what real soldiering was like, the blood and the boredom and the chickenshit. Great writing. Gained some perspective from a left-leaning highly educated man who had a love-hate relationship with combat life, but completely detested non-combat soldiering. He was bitter drunkard. He loved the outdoors and especially the water. On one hand he represented the experienced old hats (who'd been in 2 out of 3 of Easy's jumps) and could've been promoted had he stayed in combat longer. On the other hand, he was somewhat lazy, insubordinate, and when alcohol was available, drunk most of the time. Interesting read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I didnโ€™t actually finish this one, as I just wanted to hear about the paratroopersโ€™ experience up to & including Normandy. The story then continues to Operation Market Garden, the Bulge, and Germany itself as we all know from watching Band of Brothers. This is the story comprised from the amazing letters one of the soldiers sent home. We remember this soldier as โ€œthe Harvard guyโ€ in Band of Brothers. I liked the book because itโ€™s more raw & real than Ambroseโ€™ work (not surprising). Itโ€™s not jaded I didnโ€™t actually finish this one, as I just wanted to hear about the paratroopersโ€™ experience up to & including Normandy. The story then continues to Operation Market Garden, the Bulge, and Germany itself as we all know from watching Band of Brothers. This is the story comprised from the amazing letters one of the soldiers sent home. We remember this soldier as โ€œthe Harvard guyโ€ in Band of Brothers. I liked the book because itโ€™s more raw & real than Ambroseโ€™ work (not surprising). Itโ€™s not jaded & cynical exactly, just real.

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    A different kind of memoir from a marginal soldier. Webster clearly did not want to be in the Army but did what he thought was necessary for the times. His candor at the idiocracy that sometimes exists in the military is not often found except in books like "Helmet for my Pillow" (Which is much better written) . While an interesting read I found him to be a bit of a whiner and moaner who I probably would not have liked very much on a personal level. Regardless, it is a interesting read and shows A different kind of memoir from a marginal soldier. Webster clearly did not want to be in the Army but did what he thought was necessary for the times. His candor at the idiocracy that sometimes exists in the military is not often found except in books like "Helmet for my Pillow" (Which is much better written) . While an interesting read I found him to be a bit of a whiner and moaner who I probably would not have liked very much on a personal level. Regardless, it is a interesting read and shows that not all of Easy Company of the 506 PR were really a "Band of Brothers".

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike Seiber

    I have read the Band of Brothers book as well as seen the mini series countless times. I have thought Webster was one of those people that more needed to have been fleshed out about himself, even in the episode that he was the feature character. This book filled in so many details that happened on the lines that the others do not get across, from how he felt about the army to his interactions with his fellow soldiers. I highly interesting read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Iain

    An excellent account of life in the American Army during World War II, but it's not for everyone. To begin with, Webster recounts very few episodes of combat. What he excels at is giving us a picture of day-to-day life. And in doing so he gives us a vivid sense of how ragged America's infantry formations were at war's end. He also leaves us despising both American officers and those in the Army's rear echelons.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jean Dupenloup

    A fascinating memoir about the horrors of WWII and the courage of American paratroopers. I picked up David Websterโ€™s book about after watching the HBO mini-series Band of Brothers. I was not disappointed. The book is well written, emotional at times, and a real window into the psychology of soldiers risking their lives in an incredible manner to liberate Europe. A great read and an important historical testimony.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Esequiel Contreras Jr

    Daniel Webster had a unique talent for expressing his emotions. His distaste for the military officers and the rules of war played havoc on his intelligence and he seems to articulate those thoughts in very meaning manner. Those officers he did like were far and few between and typically men of valor who led from the front.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brook

    This book written by David Webster is different from any other Easy Company soldier memoirs I read. It is written long before Band of Brother book, maybe when the memory was still fresh, therefore has tremendous details more than others. For example, he could remember and try to retell what his company commander said in mission briefing before D-Day. A small incident he experienced could last several pages long. I usually found myself lost in seas of details. David Webster was originally in Fox C This book written by David Webster is different from any other Easy Company soldier memoirs I read. It is written long before Band of Brother book, maybe when the memory was still fresh, therefore has tremendous details more than others. For example, he could remember and try to retell what his company commander said in mission briefing before D-Day. A small incident he experienced could last several pages long. I usually found myself lost in seas of details. David Webster was originally in Fox Company, and jumped with HQ Company on D-Day. After 101st Airborne was relieved and returned to England, he was transferred to Easy Company. He fought in Holland and was hit in the Islands. He stayed in hospital for a long time and missed the Battle of Bulge, which made his 1st platoon comrades angry. He stayed with Easy company until his points was finally enough. He wrote his feelings and thoughts a lot and we can find how he changed during the war. In the beginning he could have become an officer to join the war with the help of his family, but he refused and enlisted as a private. While gradually he became fed up with the war. Webster was learning English literature in Harvard University before joining paratroopers. And his writing contains far more vocabularies than other similar books I read. Reading can be difficult if vocabulary is limited.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Delaware

    A gripping first hand account of the experiences of an American Paratrooper in Europe during WWII. The author offers insight into the daily life of a soldier from D-Day to the fall of the Third Reich several months later. The memoir is sad, humorous, frustrating and nail biting as he takes the reader through his experiences that so few today have known.

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

    Really good. This is different than most memoirs of soldiers. He is very matter of fact about his fate. He does not have a word of false bravo. Most of his actions reports are concerned with being careful and then the bullets stop flying finding food. He covers all the small details of prep and equipment.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jane Thompson

    World War II Story This is an interesting book. The story is full of the essential to combat and the author tells the truth more often than the reader would like It is well written and teaches one about the basis of life in combat.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    I think what I liked most about this book is that it was written so soon after the war (compared to the others who wrote theirs late in life) that it seems more honest. I think a lot can be lost over several decades after the war and Webster captured some of whatโ€™s missing in the othersโ€™ memoirs.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brent Kassing

    Honest and Interesting Having read lots of WW2 book I came about reading this one following watching Band of Brothers. A refreshingly honest experience of the war. Bother the good and bad of life in the army.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Darik Horn

    Nicely complements Band of Brothers This book is worthwhile if you wanted more after reading the Band of Brothers book or miniseries. Webster didn't feel the triumph or camaraderie that is a theme in other works.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bonni B

    Webster's prose and experiments in narrative tense make Parachute Infantry an interesting read. As a fan of his character in Band of Brothers, I was not disappointed by this insight into the real man's experience of war. (And I have to say, they nailed his whiny persona pretty well!)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robert Hendry

    I thought the parts about the combat period of the war were so-so. The part that I did like, which bumped it from two stars to three for me, were his descriptions of his experiences post Nazi surrender in Austria. Maybe that is because it is the first time I had read a first hand account of this.

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