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Callista is a brave Jedi warrior who gave her life to save a sanctuary for wives and children of Jedi knights from obliteration by the Empire. Suddenly, a dreadnought is rearming itself for shelter destruction. Only Luke Skywalker can feel the evil presence and the influence of believed decades-dead Callista.


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Callista is a brave Jedi warrior who gave her life to save a sanctuary for wives and children of Jedi knights from obliteration by the Empire. Suddenly, a dreadnought is rearming itself for shelter destruction. Only Luke Skywalker can feel the evil presence and the influence of believed decades-dead Callista.

30 review for Children of the Jedi

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Probably the worst SW book I've read. Lame, derivative, pointless. Hambly tosses the usual SW suspects into a moonlet; introduces the obligatory Palpatine clone/hand/minion/offspring; starts the ticking clock, and it still comes out with a hodgepodge of seemingly plagiarized elements. Did Hambly read other SW novels before writing this? No, did she see the movies? She apparently doesn't understand what the Force is or how it works (or doesn't). She included the cliches, but not the spirit of Star Probably the worst SW book I've read. Lame, derivative, pointless. Hambly tosses the usual SW suspects into a moonlet; introduces the obligatory Palpatine clone/hand/minion/offspring; starts the ticking clock, and it still comes out with a hodgepodge of seemingly plagiarized elements. Did Hambly read other SW novels before writing this? No, did she see the movies? She apparently doesn't understand what the Force is or how it works (or doesn't). She included the cliches, but not the spirit of Star Wars. That said, this book has one of the best SW covers I've seen yet. The portrayal of Callista is perfect. (Too bad Hambly didn't do as well with her own character.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevis Hendrickson

    I've read quite a few Star Wars books in my time and not all of them were great. But Children of the Jedi by Barbara Hambly is without question the worst Star Wars book ever written. I had to fight to get through the book and found the story to be quite lacking in every department. The romance between Luke and Callista seemed forced and was a complete turn off. Children of the Jedi is easily one of the worst books I've ever read and is a black eye on the Star Wars franchise. I don't know how thi I've read quite a few Star Wars books in my time and not all of them were great. But Children of the Jedi by Barbara Hambly is without question the worst Star Wars book ever written. I had to fight to get through the book and found the story to be quite lacking in every department. The romance between Luke and Callista seemed forced and was a complete turn off. Children of the Jedi is easily one of the worst books I've ever read and is a black eye on the Star Wars franchise. I don't know how this book ever saw the light of day. The only thing worse than the clumsy writing is the ridiculous ending. What a tragedy. 1/2 star.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    The great Jedi Master Luke passes out - Times Four! Han, Luke, and Leia are on Ithor, enjoying the beautiful Time of Meeting, when an old associate of Han's appears and leaves them with a cryptic message. This message leads Han and Leia to the mysterious world of Belsavis, and Luke and his students, Cray Mingla, brilliant scientist, and her fiancee, Nichos Marr, head to the Moonflower Nebula. Both quickly uncover a plot by a former Emperor's Hand to destroy Belasavis. NOTE: I read this book years The great Jedi Master Luke passes out - Times Four! Han, Luke, and Leia are on Ithor, enjoying the beautiful Time of Meeting, when an old associate of Han's appears and leaves them with a cryptic message. This message leads Han and Leia to the mysterious world of Belsavis, and Luke and his students, Cray Mingla, brilliant scientist, and her fiancee, Nichos Marr, head to the Moonflower Nebula. Both quickly uncover a plot by a former Emperor's Hand to destroy Belasavis. NOTE: I read this book years ago and recently listened to the audiobook. I Liked: This time around I caught a small line that said that no one was quite sure who the Eye of Palpatine was created to attack, but it was a large enemy. Could that be the Yuuzhan Vong, whom Palpatine may have seen? Did he rise to power to prevent the galaxy from falling into their hands? No one knows, but it's interesting. Another tiny part that recurrs is the Emperor's Hand. In the Thrawn Trilogy, Thrawn tells Mara she wasn't the only Emperor's Hand. Here, we get to see another, Roganada Ismaren. Seeing Callista and Altis reminds me of the books by Traviss where they make cameo appearances. Kinda interesting to see how they have been tied in. I hope we get more stories of Callista from the prequel era. Lastly, Han and Leia's investigation of Belsavis isn't that bad. I Didn't Like: On one hand, I didn't feel the revulsion for this book that I had felt for it when I read it as a teen (surprise, I know!) or for the Jedi Academy trilogy. On the other hand, it doesn't mean it was an amazing book. The first thing I noticed was the pervasive flowery language. I've noticed audiobooks can cut out some of that (which I appreciate), but this book opened with a particularly flowery passage that I had to listen to more than once to get an idea what the heck was going on. There are several other parts where things are happening, and Hambly just stops to detail everything in the scene. And really, for this story, there is no need for over-describing. I appreciated how Hambly didn't try to shoehorn everyone into the book, but none of the characters quite felt themselves. One of Han Solo's first lines is a particularly nasty line about Cray, which comes out like "you mean the blonde with legs?" Uh, excuse me? What Han is this? Not the Han Solo that is happily married to Leia. Speaking of Leia, I don't think she would be particularly impressed with Han buying her a dress that cost 30% of most planet's incomes. Leia has never been that kind of woman at all. Luke Skywalker is nasty, honestly, but I want to talk about him separately. The choice to continue the Mara and Lando subplot is hideous (at least it is easily retconned by Zahn--thank you!!). Nichos Marr feels too much like Data--a man with his own hands and head, but everything else is robotic? And they couldn't transfer his personality so he acted like a droid? What about Darth Vader? That guys was almost all robot and he still could love and think and emote. Cray was a stereotypical scientist, hot and sexy, yet brilliant and Force-sensitive too! And Callista, while good...well, let me talk about her separately too. The concept of the Eye of Palpatine is one that has seen too much exposure in the novels of this time: the Empire creating superweapons. Number one, how did they have the money, after the TWO Death Stars, to build this? Number two, why so many superwepaons? If the Death Star was the ultimate power, why have the Sun Crusher, the Eye of Palpatine, the Galaxy Gun? And Number three, why make something as unwieldy as the Eye of Palpatine? Supposedly it is so big and secretive...only, how could something that big be so secretive? Why send your troops to random planets for this big, huge superweapon to pick up and attract attention to itself? Why make this thing so stupid it can't tell the difference between stormtroopers and Jawas, Gamorreans, and Tusken Raiders? If I were Palpatine, I would be getting my money back on this thing. Another big beef I have with this book is the Luke Skywalker plot. He goes searching in the Moonflower Cluster, at the beckon of the Force, and basically does nothing but hobble around on the superweapon, getting into fights between two opposing Gamorrean (!) clans, and having literal cybersex with a computer. Actually, not a computer. This is Callista, who was a Jedi, but somehow learns to get into a computer (I have never met anyone who was actually able to explain how the heck this happens in Star Wars, but it must be related to how Palpatine keeps coming back as a clone). Luke meets her and two seconds later, they are in lurve, and he can't bear to part from her, and he is calling her "Baby" (BABY?!?! Not even Han says that to Leia!). What. The. Heck??? Talk about love at first sight! Their relationship is so slapshod, so hasty, so chemistry-less that I was gagging whenever I had to hear these two together. Another part that really gets my goat is this: (view spoiler)[Callista imports herself into Cray's body and starts to CHANGE Cray's eye color and hair color to Callista's. I may have been able to believe Callista taking over Cray's body, but for her to change it?! No way! (hide spoiler)] Lastly, and I promise this is it, Luke Skywalker, the only Jedi Master, the man who destroyed the first Death Star, fought with the Emperor, and saved Darth Vader, passes out FOUR times in this novel. Almost every scene with him ends with him getting knocked unconscious or blacking out! It almost makes Eragon look tame (at least Eragon was an idiot and not a Jedi Master!). Dialogue/Sexual Situations/Violence: A few cases of d*** and h***. Cray and Nichos are lovers. Callista and Luke have cybersex (tee hee). Lightsaber duels, explosions, violent Gamorreans, Luke walking around all day on a broken leg. Overall: Probably more like a 1.5 or even (pushing it) a 2, this book has a good, solid idea and flounders in flowery writing, out of character experiences, and a horrendous love story. Fortunately, little to nothing in this book (or series) has any factor on later books, so I recommend you skip this one all together.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amy Rae

    THIS IS A TWO-POINT-FIVE-STAR BOOK and it's sort of killing me to round up to 3, but here we are. Children of the Jedi has some interesting ideas about the nature of humanity, as well as some interesting settings. How close to human intelligence is artificial intelligence? How far are you willing to go to save a loved one? Do people ever really change? It's also setting up a Boys from Brazil-esque hunt for Imperials who beat the system by hiding out on Planet Nowheresville, but it looks like you' THIS IS A TWO-POINT-FIVE-STAR BOOK and it's sort of killing me to round up to 3, but here we are. Children of the Jedi has some interesting ideas about the nature of humanity, as well as some interesting settings. How close to human intelligence is artificial intelligence? How far are you willing to go to save a loved one? Do people ever really change? It's also setting up a Boys from Brazil-esque hunt for Imperials who beat the system by hiding out on Planet Nowheresville, but it looks like you'll have to read the whole trilogy for that stuff. It's also full of fucking stupid ideas: Can Luke Skywalker fall in love with a Jedi soul living inside a computer and then fuck her on the astral plane? Yes, he definitely can. Can she then (view spoiler)[take over the body of a chick who doesn't want to live anymore so they can ~be together~, at least until the powers that be decide Mara would be a better wife for him? (hide spoiler)] Damn straight. What about Leia having an out-of-body experience that ends with an out-of-body chase back to her heavily sedated corpus? Of course. This is the old EU, son, where dumb ideas frolic with smart ones and occasionally smother them in their beds. Before you even get to any of this banana-factory plot, though, you have to survive Barbara Hambly's terrible prose. To call it flowery is an insult to gardens everywhere. Her sentences are enormous and jumbled, and I frequently had no idea what was going on for pages at a time. She means well, and she writes romance better than Timothy "I am definitely not a lizard-person from another planet trying to learn about human emotions" Zahn. But her prose is an incredible chore to read, and it's entirely to blame for the fact that this book took me nearly a month to read. (A MONTH! You guys, I am NOT a slow reader for the most part!) I think this is the least enjoyable Star Wars book I've read yet. The Courtship of Princess Leia is terrible, and it's fuckin stupid, but it's fun, and I know what's going on in 98% of the book. (I don't always have the "why" down--Han, why are you using a mind-control gun on Leia, &cet.--but the "what" is pretty clear.) Children of the Jedi, meanwhile, deserves the Gentleman's F (in this case, a 2-star rating, rounded up a little because a lot of her ideas would be good if they were better-written), because it's not even one-star fun. It's two-star "there's no way in hell I'm reading the other two books in this trilogy--and also, why is Luke space racist in this? he's really space racist, you guys, he thinks terrible things about Jawas." This is a book where you should ctrl-F your favourite characters' names and call it a night. As nice as some of the individual scenes are (I am still in love with Leia's feelings on Han's smuggling skills, because I have a problem and it is them), the whole is Not Worth It.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Here's the thing: I have an upchuck reflex just thinking about this book. I know that I should say, "HATEY HATE HATE SO BAD!" because that's what I'm doing without even thinking about it. I remember laughing at this and ranting about how bad it was, and I remember it being one of the few SW books I gave away. ... and unfortunately, now, eight years or so after I read this, I have no idea why. So, ah, take it with a grain of salt.

  6. 4 out of 5

    J.

    I had a sort of mixed reaction in reading Children of the Jedi, because it didn't work for me on a literary level and it frustrated me just due to the contradictory nature of most of its entirety. The timeline is crazy wrong, which normally can be forgiven because it predates the prequel trilogy, but at the same time the author can't manage to get the continuity from the previous Jedi Academy series which precede the events of this book. She somehow manages to switch up who destroyed the Sun Cru I had a sort of mixed reaction in reading Children of the Jedi, because it didn't work for me on a literary level and it frustrated me just due to the contradictory nature of most of its entirety. The timeline is crazy wrong, which normally can be forgiven because it predates the prequel trilogy, but at the same time the author can't manage to get the continuity from the previous Jedi Academy series which precede the events of this book. She somehow manages to switch up who destroyed the Sun Crusher, and makes some pretty glaring errors with the physiology of Gamorreans. All of this sounds like crazy fanboy ranting but considering the majority of the people who read these books are hardcore fans, I can't imagine it would do anything for them either.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Unless you are a SW completeist, avoid this book (and all others by Hambly) like the plague! Hell, even if you MUST have every SW book printed, just don't read it-put it on the shelf with your collection and never touch it again. Barbara Hambley's books are filled chock full with fail and aids-I've even tried reading her non-SW fic, and it's like reading bad fan fiction online. I won't even deign to give this book a single star. Blech!

  8. 5 out of 5

    David Cordero

    Slow to develop but it comes to a nice end regardless.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Of the many Star Wars Expanded Universe novels I have read, Barbara Hambly's "Children of the Jedi" ranks somewhere in the middle. I've certainly read much better books in the series, but I've also read worse. Coming off the heels of reading Dave Wolverton's horribly cheesy "The Courtship of Princess Leia", this book was superb. Hambly is a talented writer who clearly has a knack for developing character depth. In this book, in particular, she gives the character of Princess Leia much more charac Of the many Star Wars Expanded Universe novels I have read, Barbara Hambly's "Children of the Jedi" ranks somewhere in the middle. I've certainly read much better books in the series, but I've also read worse. Coming off the heels of reading Dave Wolverton's horribly cheesy "The Courtship of Princess Leia", this book was superb. Hambly is a talented writer who clearly has a knack for developing character depth. In this book, in particular, she gives the character of Princess Leia much more characterization and play within the story than other books I have read in the series. Hambly delves deeper into Leia's emotional life, especially in regards to her grief and mourning over the loss of her entire home planet, Alderaan, an aspect of her character that I have never adequately seen displayed in either the films or other novels prior to this. Set several years after the events of "Return of the Jedi", "Children of the Jedi" sees Han and Leia married, with three children. Leia is President of the New Republic. Luke has set up the Jedi Academy on Yavin, and has been scouring the galaxy searching for young recruits. They are all on a diplomatic mission to the planet Belsavis when one of Han's old smuggler buddies shows up with a strange warning. His message is almost indecipherable, as he has clearly gone mad, but he manages to elicit a few understandable words: "children of the Jedi" being the most clear. Apparently, long ago, several Jedi, after the Purge, brought their children to this planet to escape the Jedi Massacre that was led by Emperor Palpatine. Rumors of their settlement persist, but no one has any memory of them. Luke, in his separate investigation in another part of the galaxy, has discovered an Imperial Dreadnaught called the Eye of Palpatine, left to rot in a forgotten corner of space. Unfortunately, no one remembered to give the abort orders to the ship's computer, which seems to have developed into a powerful Artificial Intelligence calling itself the Will, that has a telekinetic control over the remaining life forms on board the ship. It is still intent on its original mission, which is the destruction of Belsavis. Meanwhile, Han and Leia's investigation uncovers the existence of a former spy of the Emperor's living amongst the people of Belsavis. They, unfortunately, aren't sure who the spy is. All the while, weird inexplicable mechanical "accidents" are occurring all over the planet. Overall, this was a decent and very readable Star Wars adventure.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    C-390 was good. Learned interesting stuff about stormtrooper indoctrination. General plot and also the romance was passe at best.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    If you ever get your hands on a copy of this book. This is your only warning. Burn It!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Justin Benz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What a weird, weird book... After almost a decade, I thought it would be fun to check out some of the Star Wars novels that I had not checked out before. I had indeed heard plenty of the negative fan reactions surrounding this and some of the other novels that had been released as part of the early bloom of EU volumes in the 1990s (especially Vonda McIntyre's Crystal Star, which will have to wait for another day), but I figured it might still be worth a read. Maybe I was just drawn in by the col What a weird, weird book... After almost a decade, I thought it would be fun to check out some of the Star Wars novels that I had not checked out before. I had indeed heard plenty of the negative fan reactions surrounding this and some of the other novels that had been released as part of the early bloom of EU volumes in the 1990s (especially Vonda McIntyre's Crystal Star, which will have to wait for another day), but I figured it might still be worth a read. Maybe I was just drawn in by the colorful cover art and was just in the mood for some good old sci-fi schlock. SPOILER WARNING... To that latter schlocky end, the book certainly delivered. All other things aside, Barbara Hambly has a real talent for creating and cultivating atmospheres, almost to the point where the settings are more interesting and engrossing than the plot elements that lay within. I really enjoyed the vivid descriptions of the Ithorian planet and the glacial/volcanic-rift planet Belsavis. As well, the sections that took place in the Imperial dreadnaught 'Eye of Palpatine' always seemed to project a bleak, grey, and ominously darkening mood that seemed fitting for an abandoned pseudo-Death-Star that had been left out in space for 30 years and reactivated out of nowhere. However, at times, the level of description made it a little hard to follow Hambly's narrative, especially for the scenes in the Eye of Palpatine. More than once, I completely forgot what characters were on what decks and what elevator shaft Luke and C-3PO were attempting to traverse for whatever reason, but this is a minor complaint. Despite all these great locations, the book suffers massively from the author's awkward efforts to constantly remind or reassure her readers that 'look, see! This is a STAR WARS story...look at this STAR WARS thing I put here!!' As such, the reader is assaulted with a barrage of awkward back-references and out-of-place metaphors that somehow suggest that the whole universe of Star Wars is basically a macrocosm of the contents of the three original movies. In addition to the heaps of stilted dialogue and shoehorned descriptions that this behavior introduces, the author steps it up even worse by having the 'Eye of Palpatine' mistakenly impress a whole bunch of recognizable Star Wars creatures (Jawas, sand people, Gamorreans) into a dysfunctional ragtag starship crew. While I understood that this was an unintended consequence, it felt really forced and amateur, like something you would expect in a lousy fan-fiction story. On to the plot... Unlike most reviews I've read, I didn't really mind the fact that Luke pretty much spent the whole novel getting beat up and hobbled by the wacky group of brainwashed space aliens who ended up on-board the ship with him. I prefer Luke being as vulnerable as any other human rather than a video-game superhero like the Jedi from the Phantom Menace. Instead of just cutting his way through everyone with crazy lightsaber skills and doing backflips, Luke has to devise unusual MacGyver tricks and ruses to maneuver his way from point A to point B, all the while using a crutch, expending most of his Force powers to prevent himself from getting gangrene, and depending on C-3PO's help. I liked how Hambly used this to put him back in touch with his humble origins as a rustic moisture-farmer and mechanic. What I didn't like about Hambly's characterization was his bizarre and self-centered way of dealing with his Jedi students Cray and half-man/half-android Nichos and the ghost-in-the-machine Jedi love interest, Callista. In the beginning of the book, we get the idea that Luke went to the Ithorian gathering specifically so that Cray could work with Ithorian doctors to help Nichos with his degenerative condition. However, Nichos causes Luke to have a vague premonition and everybody drops everything to whisk away towards some mystery nebula that was discovered via a 'random number generation' of coordinates produced after Luke and Nichos use some force meditation technique. But wait, what about poor Nichos? Later, when they're all aboard the ship, Luke almost gets killed saving Cray from an execution device but later on, doesn't seem all that concerned that Cray let herself die to save his life. Instead, he's selfish and shows more excitement that Callista is now using Cray's body as a vessel. Apparently, we readers are supposed to agree that it's all good that Cray basically gave up her life because she couldn't have POSSIBLY been happy after Nichos became a total android and got fried in the reactor shaft. As regards Callista, the whole love relationship between her and Luke seemed to move way too fast. I suppose one could say the same thing about Han and Leia's relationship in 'Empire', but Luke and Callista weren't even acquaintances before this story. As for Callista herself, Hambly did a really good job on her back story. I liked the hints we get about her upbringing on a Waterworld-esque planet where sea cows need to be protected by monstrous creatures. It drew a nice parallel to Luke's Tatooine upbringing. Again, where things fall to pieces is with Hambly's dumb, forced love story. I liked that Timothy Zahn largely left romance alone when he introduced Mara Jade in his original trilogy (I haven't yet read his later books but I know they do eventually fall in love and yada-yada...) and I wish Hambly did something similar with this story. I would have rather seen Callista and Luke simply become good friends through their shared struggles on-board the ship of terror. Furthermore, I think it would have offered a better overall pathos if Cray's sacrifice and Callista's surprise corporeal appearance at the end weren't underwritten by a previously-established undying love between Luke and Callista. I'd have no problem with them falling in love in a more gradual way over the novels that follow this one. As it stands, it just seems like a dopey and rushed hero-gets-the-girl-and-they-live-happily-ever-after Disney ending in which two decent side characters have been completely reduced to cannon-fodder...or in Cray's case, bodily possession fodder. Hambly did a much better job with Leia, Han, and Chewbacca's trip to Belsavis, an investigation of a rumor that ends up being somewhat akin to Indiana Jones' trip to Pankot Palace in the Temple of Doom. I liked the sheer level of mischief and intrigue that was going on below the surface of this planet, even if I came away from reading the novel scratching my head a little. The intricate network of caves and tunnels that laid below Plett's Well housed a wonderful menagerie of bad things, including flesh-eating insects, man-eating floor monsters, creepy tentacles, and a band of drug-addled smugglers gone crazy in the dark. On top of all this, Hambly puts together a wonderful intrigue involving a former Emperor's Hand, her cruel and vicious dark Jedi son who can use the Force to manipulate electronic devices, a scientist who was involved with the construction of the Death Star, and a bunch of galactic 'old nobility' patricians and Ayn-Randian corporate magnates who are willing to rally behind these three simply as a means of resisting the left-liberal motivations of the Rebellion/New Republic. I liked the back-story of the two main villains and their insane scheme, especially the part that's told through a series of diary pages left by a scientist they captured to give the son his robot-controlling ability. Hambly does a good job of underscoring an idea that Palpatine's various plans and intrigues were often little more than the crazy, over-the-top acts of a power-drunk psychopath who loved doing evil things. Why NOT have TWO Emperor's Hands instead of one? Why NOT build a moon-sized superweapon to bombard a specific planet? I'm not sure if this was intentional, but it's well in line with the characterization he's given in 'Return of the Jedi' and the prequels. I liked the sections in which our hero characters slowly stuck their noses into this evil mishmosh, especially the part that followed Leia up onto the tundra and into the maze-like tunnel network. One minor complaint that should be raised is the fact that Hambly completely writes out Han and Leia's three children. She basically sends them off with a caretaker in the beginning of the book and we barely hear about them ever again. Furthermore, while I did thoroughly enjoy Leia's pursuit of the villains into the tunnels, the whole thing felt like a remarkably reckless thing for a mother-of-three to dive into. Hambly explains this by describing how Leia still carried all sorts of baggage and vengeful feelings about the destruction of Alderaan and the people who built the Emperor's superweapons, etc..., but the near-absence of the children in her thoughts and motivations was a little distracting. Even so, the parts of the story that followed Leia were probably the best parts of the book. I liked the few times when she clumsily wrangled minor Force powers in the way a mostly untrained Force-user might. Han and Chewbacca also have some interesting adventures. I especially enjoyed the section where they find their way into the tunnels and all hell breaks lose with the aforementioned menagerie. There's also a lot of good banter between them that does a decent job of capturing the rollicking, trash-talking spirit of their friendship that we see in the movies. Other minor characters get saddled with borderline-useless roles. Mara Jade makes a few holo-calls to the heroes and can never seem to get through a conversation before Hambly reminds us that she's having a fling with Lando Calrissian. I haven't read the Jedi Academy books, so for me there's obviously some background missing from between the end of Zahn's Last Command and the events of this novel. Jade's and Admiral Ackbar's only purposes seem to be providing the main characters with information about larger galactic intrigues, and to that flimsy end the characters do their jobs. Still, it would have been nice if Mara Jade had actually told them she was coming instead of throwing a selfish hissy fit about the other Emperor's Hand and hanging up the holo-phone on poor Han Solo. Overall, this book is definitely somewhat of a goofy, stinking mess, but it wasn't the out-and-out train wreck that I expected going in. Luke and Callista's story is definitely the worst thing Hambly brings to the table, but it's somewhat balanced by the exciting and madcap adventuring with the other characters on Belsavis. At this point, I guess I should go back and read Kevin Anderson's Jedi Academy books, as I've heard that the sequel he wrote to this novel draws a bit off of that trilogy. Hambly already spoiled the ending to that trilogy about five times, but I'm sure it's still worth a look. After that, I'll venture forward into the other two volumes that make up Hambly's and Anderson's trilogy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Children Of The Jedi picks up a little after the previous book with Luke encountering The Eye of Palpatine and getting to hang out with Callista a Jedi who has literally attached herself to the gunnery controls of the ship! :D This produces a clever dynamic throughout as Luke (who spends most of the book wounded and keeping an eye out for a Bacta tank! :D ) struggles to find away to save her but at the same time to blow the ship to kingdom come! :D The situation is compounded as the ship has bee Children Of The Jedi picks up a little after the previous book with Luke encountering The Eye of Palpatine and getting to hang out with Callista a Jedi who has literally attached herself to the gunnery controls of the ship! :D This produces a clever dynamic throughout as Luke (who spends most of the book wounded and keeping an eye out for a Bacta tank! :D ) struggles to find away to save her but at the same time to blow the ship to kingdom come! :D The situation is compounded as the ship has been collecting multiple species and taking control of them through an AI known as the will! :D There are laugh out scenes aplenty as Luke has to keep force convincing them that he is actually a Empire agent and this forms a running gag throughout the book! :D At the same time Han and Leia are on Belasavis having to deal with some rogue elements and left overs from the Emperors cool club who are still trying to use the Palpatine! :D The book provides great character insights for example Han extolling on Belasavis to Leia of his great dish washing experience! :D At the same time the book is brutal in they critical way that Luke looks at himself as while he is doing the daring do actually having another Jedi around from before his time allows himself to put events and the work he is doing in a new context! :D This gives the novel a feel that contrast brilliantly with the action that take place on the ship and on Belasavis! :D Children of the Jedi neatly ties up everything with the Eye of Palpatine arriving at Belasavis with neat twists as inevitably the Dark Side turns on itself! :D The end of the book has some neat twisting though promises plots twists everywhere in the later books! :D Children of the Jedi is inventive, building on the character development in spades and at the same time keeping you guessing all the way through! :D It is clever, insightful, action packed and full of adventure crisp high five! :D

  14. 4 out of 5

    TheBookHunter

    Children of the Jedi is a novel I'd really like to say is not an essential read for anyone looking to get into Star Wars books. In fact, the novel is severely lacking the excitement that is Star Wars. I once received this book years back as a gift and after reading it through I was blown away of how bizarre, out of place and drab this story was. It's practically a trippy fever dream through half of it, as our main cast of characters, Han Solo, Princess Leia and Luke Skywalker are separated for th Children of the Jedi is a novel I'd really like to say is not an essential read for anyone looking to get into Star Wars books. In fact, the novel is severely lacking the excitement that is Star Wars. I once received this book years back as a gift and after reading it through I was blown away of how bizarre, out of place and drab this story was. It's practically a trippy fever dream through half of it, as our main cast of characters, Han Solo, Princess Leia and Luke Skywalker are separated for their individual quests and encounter strange things. I'm not joking about the fever dream aspect either, because Luke for the most part gets into circumstances that cause him to mostly pass out and reawake as he's aboard this mysterious ship that for some reason has a manner of creatures aboard it and oh, encounters the spirit of a long dead Jedi woman trapped within the computer systems. Lolwut Also Leia goes into her own Force-induced acid trips at least twice in this story and we get glimpses of her own big fears. I can't begin to count the times 'wtf' would echo in my mind while trying to make sense of this story This novel in short is one you can skip over if you're collecting old Expanded Universe books. The semi follow-up book: Darksaber by Kevin J Anderson, is decent enough and to be completely honest you can go into that without running into complications or worrying about continuity with Children of the Jedi because in itself didn't follow continuity that much. Or get this book for giggles if you'd like! Try finding a cheap used copy somewhere so you don't waste too much money.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    Not terrible, but very underwhelming. The whole Luke/Callista subplot was a little weird. There were a few moments that I felt clashed a bit with the Star Wars continuity, but nothing that really bothered me. The biggest problem was that the book felt extremely long with very little plot advancement going on. A more concise story would have been more enjoyable. The author also had an annoying tendency to add paragraphs of irrelevant description in the middle of dialogue, causing the reader to lo Not terrible, but very underwhelming. The whole Luke/Callista subplot was a little weird. There were a few moments that I felt clashed a bit with the Star Wars continuity, but nothing that really bothered me. The biggest problem was that the book felt extremely long with very little plot advancement going on. A more concise story would have been more enjoyable. The author also had an annoying tendency to add paragraphs of irrelevant description in the middle of dialogue, causing the reader to lose track of the conversation. Add in a few largely forgettable villains, and you end up with a book that doesn't really add anything substantial to the Star Wars Expanded Universe (RIP).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    The majority of the reviews for Children of the Jedi are either saying it's among the worst of the Star Wars novels...or among the best. My feelings on it were more moderate; it wasn't amazing, but it also wasn't terrible. The story was decent, although nowhere near as enthralling as any of the movies. The writing was also passable. In fact, pretty much everything about Children of the Jedi was mediocre; so much so, that I can only recommend it to die-hard Star Wars enthusiasts, or those who hav The majority of the reviews for Children of the Jedi are either saying it's among the worst of the Star Wars novels...or among the best. My feelings on it were more moderate; it wasn't amazing, but it also wasn't terrible. The story was decent, although nowhere near as enthralling as any of the movies. The writing was also passable. In fact, pretty much everything about Children of the Jedi was mediocre; so much so, that I can only recommend it to die-hard Star Wars enthusiasts, or those who have read almost every other Expanded Universe novel in existence.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donsmaniac

    Ok i'm gonna be honest and say there is a few books in the star wars expanded universe that you should avoid and this is one of them. Maybe its just me but i found this book boring and a challenge to finish it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    William Hill

    Easily one of the most offensively stupid books I've read with Star Wars written on the cover. It's a dull, stilted, poorly conceived "adventure". It makes Attack of the Clones look like Citizen Kane.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ojas

    this book confused the hell outta me, i have good reading comprehension skills, but i had no clue what was going on in this book

  20. 5 out of 5

    Meggie

    For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: Children of the Jedi by Barbara Hambly. SOME HISTORY: Kevin J. Anderson approached Barbara Hambly at a convention about writing a story for Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina, and when Bantam heard she was interested they asked her “why not a novel?” Hambly was told by her For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: Children of the Jedi by Barbara Hambly. SOME HISTORY: Kevin J. Anderson approached Barbara Hambly at a convention about writing a story for Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina, and when Bantam heard she was interested they asked her “why not a novel?” Hambly was told by her editor to make “the story of the great love of Luke’s life.” By 1995, she had published a number of fantasy novels (I have fond memories of her 1985 novel Dragonsbane), as well as three Star Trek books. Her background was definitely more heavy on the fantasy rather than the science fiction side, though, which makes her choice an interesting decision on Bantam’s part. (And additionally, might explain why the Callista books feel more fantastical and esoteric than your usual Star Wars story). Children of the Jedi made it to number six on the New York Times bestseller list for the week of April 30, 1995, and was on the NYT list for four weeks. MY RECOLLECTION OF THE BOOK: I actually remembered most of the book. People may decry Hambly’s purple prose, but so many elements of this book—the various aliens brainwashed into thinking they’re stormtroopers on the Eye of Palpatine, Han and Leia and Chewbacca investigating the Lovecraftian beauty of Belsavis—stuck with me. I hadn’t read it in over fifteen years, but everything was familiar for once. PRINCESS LEIA COSTUME CHANGE COUNT: I have to hand it to Hambly: she gave me enough outfits for Leia! From her silk tabard and gown that she wears on Ithor, to the practical clothes she sported on Belsavis, we got a number of outfit descriptions in this one. I’m not sure I agree with her description of Leia’s hair as auburn or cinnabar, though; at least in the original trilogy, Leia’s hair seemed more chocolate brown to me, and didn’t appear to have a ton of red tones. A BRIEF SUMMARY: An old smuggler buddy of Han Solo crashes the Time of Meeting on Ithor with a message: someone is coming to kill them all. Princess Leia, Han, and Chewbacca head to Belsavis to investigate the mysterious “children of the Jedi,” while Luke Skywalker, C-3PO, and two of Luke’s students head to mysterious coordinates in the Moonflower Nebula and become trapped on the Eye of Palpatine, a 30-year-old Dreadnaught reawakened on its deadly mission to Belsavis. THE CHARACTERS: I thought Hambly did a nice job portraying Leia and Luke in this book. Ambush at Corellia had a weird throwaway part about how Leia’s family is important to her because she was always aware that she was just a foster daughter to the Organas, which struck me as an odd sentiment—everything we have seen up to this point implied that the Organas loved Leia and treated her like she was their own. So it was interesting to see how Hambly developed Leia’s backstory further. We learn about Bail’s three sisters, her aunts, who Leia had both fond and frustrated feelings about. We get further insight into her role as a Princess of an Ancient House. Leia also plays a pivotal role in their investigation on Belsavis: her tedious digging in the municipal archives uncovers the first hints of Irek’s powers, she immediately picks up on Roganda’s ill intentions, and she sneaks into their secret base. She’s caught, of course, but she accomplishes a lot! Past books have struggled with how to make Luke an interesting character, since inherently good people can sometimes be...well, boring. Hambly accomplishes this, perhaps (controversially) by stripping Luke of most of his advantages. There’s no opportunity for him to pull Superman feats when he’s concussed and hobbling around with a broken leg. It makes him feel more human, and his trials feel more real and understandable—navigate the ship without being killed by Sand People or the warring Gamorrean tribes, rescue Cray and Nichos and destroy the ship without being thwarted by the Will. And yet he’s still kind, which makes Callista first reach out to him. Han’s fine. He’s not wildly out of character, but he doesn’t have as complete an emotional arc as Leia or Luke. It was fun, though, to learn that he likes sports (he bets on smashball games with Lando!) and that he had a personal connection with some of the missing smugglers from Belsavis. I very much appreciated that while the Solo children were present in the beginning, Hambly didn’t have them running through the whole book. Luke senses that it’s not safe for them to be on Belsavis, so Winter takes them back to Coruscant. I have nothing against the Solo kids, but I don’t really enjoy reading about toddlers and babies. Mara Jade appears to be in a relationship with Lando, which some readers hated. But I didn’t mind, and it makes sense coming off of Champions of the Force that they might have gotten involved. I also like the moment when she realizes that Roganda Ismaren was another Hand; Thrawn raised the possibility of more Hands in Dark Force Rising, but Mara was not willing to even entertain the notion. Here, she’s absolutely, coldly furious at the revelation, and that frigid anger drives her actions at the end of the book. I’m a little confused about how her past visit to Belsavis fits into the timeline of her service to the Emperor—she says that she visited Plawal around the time of the Battle of Hoth, and seems to know many of the past smugglers by name. But she didn’t join Karrde’s service until one year before Heir to the Empire, so I’m not sure how that worked out (other than Hambly assumed that she was working for smugglers much sooner than she actually was). I loved Callista at first. She’s an Old Republic Jedi, with a different training history than Luke. In a way, she’s the platonic ideal of a Jedi: trained by her Master on Bespin, then sent forth into the galaxy to do good. She’s smart, she has a good sense of humor, and she develops a great rapport with Luke. But I have major issues with her ending… HAMBLY’S SETTINGS: This is a contentious opinion, but I think Hambly excels at creating unique settings. Belsavis is like a Lovecraftian version of Iceland: we have the kretch, but we also have beautiful blossoms. The valleys are lush, there are hot springs, but there’s also creepy crypts haunted by maddened smugglers. Outside of the valleys, the snow and ice could kill you of frostbite. Her lush descriptions work in her favor here. Likewise, the Eye of Palpatine is completely disorienting. Between the friendly and unfriendly aliens and the malicious Will (reminiscent of HAL from 2001: A Space Odyssey), Luke is stuck in an environment that is actively trying to kill him. But unlike Belsavis, this is a very modern, technological kind of danger—Imperial gray versus Plawal’s brighter colors. It’s hard to remember where Luke is, and where he’s going; but that confusion is shared by Luke, who is actively thwarted in his attempts to maneuver and get his bearings. ISSUES: We’re introduced to Luke’s students Cray Mingla and Nichos Marr in media res. It seems natural to me that our main characters would know people who are completely foreign to the reader. But as the reader, it’s a confounding experience. We jump right into the last bit of Cray and Nichos’s story, so everything that came before (Cray was a researcher at the Magrody Institute, Nichos was dying of a degenerative disease, Cray used Ssi-Ruuvi technology to upload his consciousness and memories into a droid body) has to be info-dumped on us. Hambly explores some intriguing ideas with Nichos: he has the same memories as the human Nichos, he has the same face, but as his core he’s just a droid, and he can’t overcome his programming. But the conclusion she reaches is troubling. Cray realizes that the human Nichos is gone, and the droid Nichos is just his memories and nothing more. Nichos’s soul never made the transfer. And without the human Nichos, Cray decides that she would rather die and give her body over to Callista. WHAT?! In the end, Cray feels less like a developed character and more like a plot device for Callista’s reincarnation. She can’t live without her lover, so she essentially commits suicide. Callista, a character who seemed to have accepted her fate and DID NOT want Luke to try to get her off the ship in computer form, is apparently perfectly taking over the body of his former student. And Luke and co. have no problem with this either?? While I like the Eye of Palpatine as a setting, I am less impressed by its role as the superweapon of the week. A dreadnaught disguised as an asteroid, that has the power to raze a whole planet. It’s no Death Star, but OK. Roganda is interesting, because she offers a glimpse into Imperial Court politics. Her son Irek is much less so. He’s basically Darth Vader 2.0, with a brain implant that lets him manipulate droids and other electronics. It’s hard to make a fifteen year old frightening, though, so he mostly comes across as a petulant child. IN CONCLUSION: There were aspects of Children of the Jedi that I absolutely loved, and parts that horrified me. Your mileage may vary whether this book works for you. Do you like purple, ornate prose with complicated passages that you might have to reread? Or do you prefer a more straightforward prose style like in the Thrawn trilogy? If it’s the latter, you probably won’t like this book—in fact, you might not even finish it. But if it’s the former, go ahead! Hambly creates such a strong sense of place that even taking into account the nightmare fuel of Cray & Nichos’s plotline and Callista’s ending, I’m still really glad I reread this one. Next up: the second book in the Corellian trilogy, Assault at Selonia by Roger MacBride Allen. My YouTube review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4ePY... --Interview with Barbara Hambly about the Callista books: http://jedicallie.tripod.com/bhinterv... --A great fanfic by deaka about Callista, afterwards: https://www.fanfiction.net/s/7052260/...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Colin McEvoy

    Man, looking over some of the reviews of this book here on Goodreads, it seems a lot of people really HATED this book, huh? As for me, perhaps because I had fairly recently read I, Jedi, which I found absolutely terrible, I didn't think Children of the Jedi was quite as objectionable as many others seem to have. It's a 2.5-star book for me, and I honestly wrestled with whether to round up or down on it. (JUST ADD HALF-STAR RATINGS ALREADY, GOODREADS!) Certainly, Children of the Jedi is a flawed Man, looking over some of the reviews of this book here on Goodreads, it seems a lot of people really HATED this book, huh? As for me, perhaps because I had fairly recently read I, Jedi, which I found absolutely terrible, I didn't think Children of the Jedi was quite as objectionable as many others seem to have. It's a 2.5-star book for me, and I honestly wrestled with whether to round up or down on it. (JUST ADD HALF-STAR RATINGS ALREADY, GOODREADS!) Certainly, Children of the Jedi is a flawed book. It drags at time, and some of its plotlines are cheesy or ineffective, and I certainly wouldn't recommend it for anybody except for Star Wars fanboys/completionists like myself. But it also had some interesting ideas, some moments of good fun, and while I didn't find Barbara Hambly's prose particularly impressive, I found her to be a fine genre writer, and far, FAR better than Michael A. Stackpole in that department. (Have I mentioned that I really hated I, Jedi?) First, the good: I enjoyed how this book delved a little more into Princess Leia's emotional turmoil over the destruction of her home planet of Alderaan, still understandably strong even 12 years later. I found the guilt she continued to experience -- both at failing to stop the planet's destruction, and over her temptation to use her political power to seek revenge against those tangentially responsible -- to be compelling. I also enjoyed the characters of Cray and Nichos and the questions their relationship raised about how similar human intelligence and artificial intelligence are from each other. (Similar themes were explored with the Callista character, though less effectively for me.) The idea of Cray saving her lover Nichos' life from a fatal illness by transferring his consciousness into a mechanical body made for an interesting subplot, and it made me wish the two characters hadn't disappeared for such a long stretch of the novel. As for the main plotline -- the asteroid-shaped Eye of Palpatine becoming remotely activated and racing to destroy a planet unless Luke Skywalker (who, by the way, REALLY got his ass kicked in this one!) and company can save it -- it was entertaining enough, but certainly a little half-baked. The idea of the ship abducting a bunch of random alien races and tricking them all into believing they were stormtroopers (with Gamorreans of Return of the Jedi fame all running around with pieces of stormtrooper armor covering their oversized bodies) has its B movie-esque amusements, but the whole thing felt a little too slapsticky. Worse than all that, however, was the romance that Hambly creates between Luke Skywalker and the disembodied Callista. The idea that Luke would fall in love -- let alone so quickly -- with a Jedi whose consciousness has been (for lack of a better word) uploaded into a spaceship for multiple decades just didn't work for me at all, and I'd have much rather all that silliness had just ended with the conclusion of this novel, rather than it being resolved the way it was. I had a few other narrative qualms with this book (like Leia very conveniently uncovering a criminal conspiracy in deus-ex-machina fashion because she happened to run into and recognize some people on the street who, up to this point, hadn't even been introduced in the novel) but for all these criticisms, I did enjoy it on some level. Perhaps I'm just overly-inclined to go easy on Star Wars books, which is my escapist, guilty-pleasure reading. Suffice it to say, only Star Wars fans should bother with this one, and even they can definitely find better reads elsewhere.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kasc

    So far, I had never gotten around to reading the Callista trilogy but since she is mentioned occasionally in later installments I felt it was time to catch up on it. Honestly, it took me a while to get into this novel as especially in the beginning the story was presented in a sort of fragmented way making it confusing to follow. Getting invested was also made harder by the initial focus on newly introduced characters that I just had a hard time caring about. Plot-wise it is a bit messy, but enj So far, I had never gotten around to reading the Callista trilogy but since she is mentioned occasionally in later installments I felt it was time to catch up on it. Honestly, it took me a while to get into this novel as especially in the beginning the story was presented in a sort of fragmented way making it confusing to follow. Getting invested was also made harder by the initial focus on newly introduced characters that I just had a hard time caring about. Plot-wise it is a bit messy, but enjoyable none the less. We are presented with two main plot lines, one following Luke and some of his Jedi pals, one following Han and Leia. We start off with Han and Leia being attacked by an old smuggler friend of Han’s. So, they jet off to investigate what that was all about. The circumstances of this trip are somewhat elusive. I mean they do not seem to waste a second on making childcare arrangements before they take off (I’m assuming they just dumped the kids on Winter again) and Leia in her role as Chief of State is apparently able to just take off without informing anyone beforehand and without taking any sort of security precautions. Nevertheless, their mission reads like a good old murder mystery with them investigating in an interesting location and I quite enjoyed it. Meanwhile Luke goes on a mission himself whose initial purpose I apparently did not grasp. The gist is that he just lets his former Jedi student turned droid give him RANDOM coordinates where they head to investigate matters loosely connected to what Han and Leia are up to. Miraculously, they actually find something relevant in this random location and end up being taken captive and mind controlled aboard an Imperial ship. Now this is where things get weird. Instead of encountering Stormtroopers aboard that vessel, it is filled with a bunch of whimsical creatures from the Star Wars universe which are in turn mind controlled making them pose as and believe they actually are Stormtroopers on some secret mission guided by the mysterious “Will”. As I mentioned, particularly Luke’s story line is a little weird. However, while this did not really bother me so much there were some other features of this book that I really did not like. First off, I did not really care for the new characters that were introduced. I get that there is a tragic love story between Cray and Nichos with him dying/turning into a droid and her doing everything in her power to salvage him. This premise certainly has some potential, I just could not really deeply care for the drama of characters I have literally just met and that haven’t had a chance to grow on me at all. To make matters worse, all chance of them gaining any relevance in the EU at large is abolished with them both being killed off. Second off, what is it with weird, awkward love stories in this novel? On the one hand, there is the insinuation that there is something going on between Lando and Mara, which is more funny than it really bugs me (man, this must have caused some awkward situations later on). On the other hand, there is the relationship between Luke and Callista which developed incredibly fast and was just cringy. The two of them have known each other for a couple of hours and yet they are deeply, madly in love with each other. Plus, they have never actually met with Callista having been dead for thirty years. Although I have never been super enthusiastic about Luke and Mara’s relationship, having developed over a long stretch of time and initiating from Mara actually wanting to kill Luke it is just way more intriguing than him just blurting out “I love you” after talking to a computer for a few days. Yet, it does get worse. In the end Callista actually takes over Crey’s body through the force to be with Luke “forever”. There are just so many things that annoy me about this. If this is something that is possible, why on earth did they not find a body somewhere for Nichos to take over? He was force sensitive, too and it would have saved them a lot of trouble. And, more importantly, Crey apparently just lost all will to live because she had to come to terms with her boyfriend being dead. I guess, let’s just forget about her being a smart, pretty scientist who is adept in the force and accept that she defines herself 100% through her relationship to a man which is why she loses all her worth once that man is dead. Plus, after this transfer - an act that probably required tremendous ability and effort - is done, Callista has lost all ability in the force (are you kidding me?). Honestly, if it weren’t for that stupid resolution I probably would have given this book a better rating. Despite all this, there were some aspects which I really liked about this book. Yes, I did not really care for Nichos or Cray, but I did enjoy his conflict about whether he is man or machine. I think that this is really something interesting to think about. Can a machine equipped with a human’s entire knowledge and memories replace a deceased? Here the answer turns out to be no, but still Nichos is aware of the conflict making the answer not as self-evident as one might think it is. What I really loved here is that the book considers Leia’s past for a change, both her youth and her inner turmoil following the first Death Star and the destruction of Alderaan. I think so far it was generally neglected that the Empire has literally taken everything from her, her family, friends, home, even political position. Naturally, the destruction of her home planet was an unthinkably traumatic event and so far, we have never seen her struggle with coping with that. Still, it totally makes sense for her to be having nightmares about it, wondering what her family would think about her life, etc. It is great that now we are shown how her life used to be like growing up, as a senator, etc. Also, it is established how sharp the contrast between her present situation and the expectations that others used to have of her is, and how conflicted she is between seeking revenge and being righteous. All of this humanizes her a little bit and adds layers to her character. It is also cool how her past ties in with the present situation here, e.g. through her connections with the Old Houses and her being accused of seeking vengeance. On a general note, the novel’s style contradicts some of its more childish content. This is most prominent with the situation aboard the Imperial space station. While the scenario with all the different creatures in Stormtrooper armor is a bit ridiculous, it is presented in a rather gory way. The creatures take each other out and the ship itself participates in the killing, all of which is presented with a level of detail that is unusual for these novels. Beside that we get numerous references to sex and some mild swearing (this is sometimes avoided using rather clever and funny allusions). As far as references to other EU stuff go, this book is not that heavy on them. So, it should not pose a problem to anyone who has not read any/a lot of the other stuff. Really, I can only remember one short sequence that was packed with references and of course Mara Jade appears from time to time and is not really introduced. But since her role is quite small that shouldn’t be an issue either. Overall, I did like this novel despite it having some major flaws. Surely, it doesn’t make the top of the list of novels I would recommend to others. Nevertheless, I would not discourage anyone who is interested from reading it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    R.J.

    FULL REVIEW ON lucieninthestars.ca I love Star Wars. It is a series that has been with me for most of my life and the entirety of the universe just makes me happy. Not to mention, that I am from a time where the original Extended Universe (often referred to as the Star Wars EU) was alive and thriving. I am aware that the long history of Star Wars novels can be confusing for fans, especially ones that were brought into the series through the newer films and the Clone Wars tv series. Because of FULL REVIEW ON lucieninthestars.ca I love Star Wars. It is a series that has been with me for most of my life and the entirety of the universe just makes me happy. Not to mention, that I am from a time where the original Extended Universe (often referred to as the Star Wars EU) was alive and thriving. I am aware that the long history of Star Wars novels can be confusing for fans, especially ones that were brought into the series through the newer films and the Clone Wars tv series. Because of this, I am going to try my best to keep this review worded in a way that will help give those fans an idea of where this story would sit in the canon, but I also recommend that those unfamiliar with the EU do a little bit of research into it before picking up this book. Now because this is EU and a lot of my review contains spoilers, all I will say is this: At the end of the day, this book helped me realize just how much I miss the original extended universe. Leia and Han’s marriage is so sweet to see and Luke in the early days of being a teacher is also such a great thing when the films never really got the chance to show that (I have not yet seen The Last Jedi so I don’t know anything about Luke being a mentor in that). Sure the story got a little complicated with all the different characters and species, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t enjoy this story. When I finished reading it, I was incredibly pleased to hear that it’s part of a trilogy and I am very excited to get my hands on the next instalments of this story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    It's been about 15 years since I read this, but I was so irritated by this book I still remember it like it was yesterday. After reading some amazing Star Wars canon (before the other two movie trilogies showed up to make it all apocrypha) - especially the amazing anthology Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina - I grabbed this one. The whole book felt like the author rewatched one or two of the movies for a reference with no interest in reading other Star Wars authors, then banged it out over the co It's been about 15 years since I read this, but I was so irritated by this book I still remember it like it was yesterday. After reading some amazing Star Wars canon (before the other two movie trilogies showed up to make it all apocrypha) - especially the amazing anthology Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina - I grabbed this one. The whole book felt like the author rewatched one or two of the movies for a reference with no interest in reading other Star Wars authors, then banged it out over the course of a week. I was so disappointed, maybe doubly so because I was excited to read a woman's contribution to the Star Wars canon. The book was like reading a school assignment by a reluctant student who was completely apathetic to the assigned topic.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wicked ♥ (Wickedly Bookish Reviews) aka Bat-Jess

    I noticed when I picked this up how many bad reviews it has received from fellow goodreads members. So, naturally I expected to utterly hate this, but I really actually enjoyed parts of it. I will admit it definitely isn't the best Star Wars novel ever or even close, but it wasn't utterly unreadable either like some Kevin J. Anderson books I've had to choke my way through. *cough*JediAcademyTrilogy*coug* Yes, it the Luke/Callista thing is a bit weird and makes me a tad uncomfortable, but it work I noticed when I picked this up how many bad reviews it has received from fellow goodreads members. So, naturally I expected to utterly hate this, but I really actually enjoyed parts of it. I will admit it definitely isn't the best Star Wars novel ever or even close, but it wasn't utterly unreadable either like some Kevin J. Anderson books I've had to choke my way through. *cough*JediAcademyTrilogy*coug* Yes, it the Luke/Callista thing is a bit weird and makes me a tad uncomfortable, but it works for what it is. Now I'm curious to see what happens to them and their relationship. This trilogy, which is written mostly by Barbara Hambly, but for some reason has the middle book written by *gag* my fav author Kev, will not be my favorite. However it will not be my most hated for obvious reasons. I'm just trudging through until I can get to the next Timothy Zahn set of books. I adore him.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Wood

    I adore this book. Have read it so many times. Such good writing and story, equal time for Luke and Han and Leia. The aliens abord the rogue ship are fantastic, specially the mushroomy chaps. The relationship that develops for Luke was one that felt very real and believable. I was more than disappointed when it was sidelined for the Mara story later on. Fantastic!! Oh, special cudos to Threepio - he acquitted himself admirably. Note - these earlier Star Wars books (particularly those written by l I adore this book. Have read it so many times. Such good writing and story, equal time for Luke and Han and Leia. The aliens abord the rogue ship are fantastic, specially the mushroomy chaps. The relationship that develops for Luke was one that felt very real and believable. I was more than disappointed when it was sidelined for the Mara story later on. Fantastic!! Oh, special cudos to Threepio - he acquitted himself admirably. Note - these earlier Star Wars books (particularly those written by ladies) have such lovely characterisations and relationships. Much better than the more male-specific books of later years.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Hewitt

    I honestly hated this book. I love Star Wars and even the more disappointing novels had something likable to it. I mean Crucible had one weird storyline the the Star Wars EU could have been better off without but this one was a whole new low. This story was unnecessary, the Luke and Callista thing was rushed and weird. Thank the maker they later put him with Mara Jade. This author I don't think knew how to write a proper Star Wars novel. So many things were just off, other than seeing familiar na I honestly hated this book. I love Star Wars and even the more disappointing novels had something likable to it. I mean Crucible had one weird storyline the the Star Wars EU could have been better off without but this one was a whole new low. This story was unnecessary, the Luke and Callista thing was rushed and weird. Thank the maker they later put him with Mara Jade. This author I don't think knew how to write a proper Star Wars novel. So many things were just off, other than seeing familiar names it didn't feel like I read a Star Wars novel. Plus it was horribly written and went at a terrible pace.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I can honestly say I did NOT like this book. I checked it out from my library to read on vacation, and did not like the whole storyline between Callista (I think that's what her name was) and Luke. I mean, doesn't he marry Mara Jade? Then why is he in love with Callista? Or, I guess it's more of in 'like', because Luke didn't know her that long. The 'Eye of Palpatine' didn't make much sense to me, and I walked away from the book feeling confused. My older brother who is 20 read it, and was confu I can honestly say I did NOT like this book. I checked it out from my library to read on vacation, and did not like the whole storyline between Callista (I think that's what her name was) and Luke. I mean, doesn't he marry Mara Jade? Then why is he in love with Callista? Or, I guess it's more of in 'like', because Luke didn't know her that long. The 'Eye of Palpatine' didn't make much sense to me, and I walked away from the book feeling confused. My older brother who is 20 read it, and was confused as well. I won't be reading anymore of Barbara Hambly's work anytime soon.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    I don't remember much about this book, but I think it's the one where Han and Leia's children are kidnapped and at one point, consumed by a Force-wielding slug thing. ETA: ok, so apparently this is not the book with the magic space slug. Instead, it is the story of Luke's attempt to destroy the Empire's superweapon "Eye of Palpatine". His only ally on the ghost ship is another ghost, that of a long-dead Jedi named Callista. I kinda liked her, but the romance was a bit soppy.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    I read this back before the new trilogy came out and it made more sense before George Lucas began fiddling around with the lore. That being said, I thought the novel was a fun read -- mistakes and all. I actually enjoyed parts of the novel, though I do have to admit I was very prone to just skimming until I found the next good part. It's not the worst novel I've read and it's definitely not the best, but overall -- it was still fun.

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