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Damia and Afra-Raven-Lyon had reared their children in a brilliant and unorthodox way. All their young had been 'paired' when six months old with the furry, one-eyed Mrdinis, the only other sentient beings in the Alliance, who could communicate with humans by their 'dream messages'. Together, Man and Mrdini worked to create prosperous worlds and guard against the terrible Damia and Afra-Raven-Lyon had reared their children in a brilliant and unorthodox way. All their young had been 'paired' when six months old with the furry, one-eyed Mrdinis, the only other sentient beings in the Alliance, who could communicate with humans by their 'dream messages'. Together, Man and Mrdini worked to create prosperous worlds and guard against the terrible threat of the annihilating Hivers. And now, in the deeps of Space, Mrdini scouts had crossed the path of three Hive ships -- ships that were giant hulks of cell units, bearing the queens and workers out into space, to breed and multiply and destroy wherever they found a viable planet. It was the four elder children of Damia -- Laria, Thian, Rojer and Zara -- all uniquely talented in their various ways, who were to play their part, helped by their life-long Dini friends, in the conquering and investigation of the Alien threat of the Hivers.


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Damia and Afra-Raven-Lyon had reared their children in a brilliant and unorthodox way. All their young had been 'paired' when six months old with the furry, one-eyed Mrdinis, the only other sentient beings in the Alliance, who could communicate with humans by their 'dream messages'. Together, Man and Mrdini worked to create prosperous worlds and guard against the terrible Damia and Afra-Raven-Lyon had reared their children in a brilliant and unorthodox way. All their young had been 'paired' when six months old with the furry, one-eyed Mrdinis, the only other sentient beings in the Alliance, who could communicate with humans by their 'dream messages'. Together, Man and Mrdini worked to create prosperous worlds and guard against the terrible threat of the annihilating Hivers. And now, in the deeps of Space, Mrdini scouts had crossed the path of three Hive ships -- ships that were giant hulks of cell units, bearing the queens and workers out into space, to breed and multiply and destroy wherever they found a viable planet. It was the four elder children of Damia -- Laria, Thian, Rojer and Zara -- all uniquely talented in their various ways, who were to play their part, helped by their life-long Dini friends, in the conquering and investigation of the Alien threat of the Hivers.

30 review for Damia's Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    A serious improvement over its predecessor. I'm glad I stuck with this series after all.

  2. 5 out of 5

    SSShafiq

    I will say upfront that this is less a novel and more a series of novelettes focused on Damia’s children. Probably because of this, the novel is probably the most successful of the series to date. The story is also the most sci-fi, actually moving the Hive plot forward. There was less emphasis on the family minutiae, which to be honest, I actually missed. This is not the most complicated sci-fi plot ever but it was good to see a focus on the macro-plot and less about baby-sitting that we got in I will say upfront that this is less a novel and more a series of novelettes focused on Damia’s children. Probably because of this, the novel is probably the most successful of the series to date. The story is also the most sci-fi, actually moving the Hive plot forward. There was less emphasis on the family minutiae, which to be honest, I actually missed. This is not the most complicated sci-fi plot ever but it was good to see a focus on the macro-plot and less about baby-sitting that we got in book 2. The positive plot momentum was counteracted by the lack of interest in the children. We don't spend a lot of time with them so I didn’t actually care about them. Some of the vignettes worked better - the second (dealing with Thian) and the last (with the emphatic Zara) were the strongest. The rest were a bit of filler, not bad but I’ve already forgotten about them. I do wonder if this episodic format will continue in the rest - if so, I hope we get more of Zara who was a change to the typical character that Ms. McCaffrey has created for this universe. I do note that the Rowan and Damia have basically become housewives in these books. I find that amusing and annoying at the same time. It’s a reflection of the age of the book and the domestic focus of these books but I do mention it as people might be annoyed by the glimpses of these ladies. I am looking forward to the next book in the series which I hope will be another solid three star read (and yes, that is a solid rating). I am especially interested to see want Ms. McCaffrey does with the Hive - I think I have an idea so I am excited to see if I am correct.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam (Hissing Potatoes)

    While the book wasn't completely free of misogyny or problematic aspects, those elements fortunately took a far back burner to actual plot, which I greatly enjoyed. Following four of Damia's children throughout space made things more interesting, and I thought the pacing of developments with the Hive studies moved well. Hopefully the rest of the series continues this way.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    I so, SO loved this book! I have loved every one of Ms McCaffrey's books that I've read so far! I really enjoy revisiting this series. I enjoy watching the Gwyn-Raven clan, and all their subgroups, as they progress in life. Learning how the children grow up and how their parents and grandparents deal with the issues of parenting "special" children.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Audio review. I love this series and have read it numerous times over the years. This time I listened to the audiobook and loved it. I have noticed that people are so picky about this series, I don't see why ! They are great stories. Fantasy, Space adventures, aliens, romance, family; this series has a lot in it worthy of reading or listening to. I have also read the other series in Anne McCaffrey's tome, Pern, Acorna, Body Heir, Brainships, Crystal Singer and others. They are all excellent of t Audio review. I love this series and have read it numerous times over the years. This time I listened to the audiobook and loved it. I have noticed that people are so picky about this series, I don't see why ! They are great stories. Fantasy, Space adventures, aliens, romance, family; this series has a lot in it worthy of reading or listening to. I have also read the other series in Anne McCaffrey's tome, Pern, Acorna, Body Heir, Brainships, Crystal Singer and others. They are all excellent of their kind. For some reason readers seem to think they should be all the same. I point out that McCaffrey wrote scifi, fantasy, and romance, with these novels there are some with more scifi and some with more fantasy or romance elements-I don't think this detracts from the story's or enjoyment of such. Those readers who simply wish an enjoyable reading experience with fun characters and adventures in space and on land read, read, read!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    In many ways this seems like two books in one. There's a big gap between Damia and Damia's children - about 15 years - so you lose a little of the rapport you had with the original Tower characters (Jeff Raven, the Rowan, Damia and Afra) as now they're seen from the children's viewpoint, but seeing each of the children find their own place to use their Talent makes up for it. The lack of focus on one character (necessary, for following all the children) does lessen my connection to them. In many ways this seems like two books in one. There's a big gap between Damia and Damia's children - about 15 years - so you lose a little of the rapport you had with the original Tower characters (Jeff Raven, the Rowan, Damia and Afra) as now they're seen from the children's viewpoint, but seeing each of the children find their own place to use their Talent makes up for it. The lack of focus on one character (necessary, for following all the children) does lessen my connection to them.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Mather

    I am really enjoying this series! Good old-fashioned sci-fi.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    I started off feeling a little "here we go again, same old same old" and thinking the writing style was a little "fluffy", but before very long I was caught up again. I'm very glad I'm reading these through (after probably 30 years since I first read them), and I'm starting to think that it's quite possible I'll work my way through them all again (definitely the Pern ones and this series) in another 20 or 30 years. McCaffrey gives me people I like, with interesting and often earnest characters. M I started off feeling a little "here we go again, same old same old" and thinking the writing style was a little "fluffy", but before very long I was caught up again. I'm very glad I'm reading these through (after probably 30 years since I first read them), and I'm starting to think that it's quite possible I'll work my way through them all again (definitely the Pern ones and this series) in another 20 or 30 years. McCaffrey gives me people I like, with interesting and often earnest characters. Many of them are "too good to be true", but who cares? I meet plenty of real people in my real life so I don't need all my books to be equally blunt or ordinary or whatever. As the title suggests, this book is about (some of) Damia's children. It's the 3rd in the Tower and the Hive series, which are The Rowan, Damia, this, Lyon's Pride, and The Tower and the Hive. It follows the development to a certain degree of four of the children, all in their teens, and it does that within the context of the relationship between Humans and Mrdini species as they learn to work together against their common enemy, The Hive. Nice work with the other races.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides

    Continuing with the author-is-dead re-read of this series. Not that the author is literally dead — though in this case, she is — but in the sense that it's more interesting to read this series in a way that the author maybe didn't intend. In this case, we see a little bit of Damia, the tempestuous heroine from the last book, but this book is mostly about her first four children. We get novellas about Laria and Thian, the first half of a short novel about Rojer, and a short story about Zara. In a Continuing with the author-is-dead re-read of this series. Not that the author is literally dead — though in this case, she is — but in the sense that it's more interesting to read this series in a way that the author maybe didn't intend. In this case, we see a little bit of Damia, the tempestuous heroine from the last book, but this book is mostly about her first four children. We get novellas about Laria and Thian, the first half of a short novel about Rojer, and a short story about Zara. In a way, this book is about how Damia and Afra have tried to do a better job at parenting (and combining parenting with work) than their own parents, particularly Damia's. At least with the first four children, they have mostly succeeded. (The next ones are too young to be out and about on their own.) But not without being kinda creepy about it — there's a passage about how "Talented parenting" (Talent being the term this series uses for psionic ability) comes with the "perquisite" of being able to read your children's minds and correct any psychological warping that may be developing. Twitch. As I see it, this is only half a book. The next one, Lyon's Pride, is as direct a continuation as a following book could be for a book that didn't end on a cliffhanger. Admittedly, this applies more to the Rojer thread than the stories of Laria, Thian, and Zara.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Willa

    In Damia's Children, one of science fiction and fantasy's most beloved novelists, Anne McCaffrey, continues the story of psychic Talent begun with The Rowan and Damia. The Rowan's next generation of passionate and talented descendants prepare to defend their worlds against an alien attack of mysterious origin. Damia had deflected a previous attack on the human worlds and sent the aliens into deep space. Hungry for more living space, they return with plans to dominate, armed with knowledge of the In Damia's Children, one of science fiction and fantasy's most beloved novelists, Anne McCaffrey, continues the story of psychic Talent begun with The Rowan and Damia. The Rowan's next generation of passionate and talented descendants prepare to defend their worlds against an alien attack of mysterious origin. Damia had deflected a previous attack on the human worlds and sent the aliens into deep space. Hungry for more living space, they return with plans to dominate, armed with knowledge of the psychic defense they can expect from humanity. However, as it has been learned that Talent can be both bred and taught, the combined abilities of Damia's children make them an even greater power than Damia or her mother. Each child has a special Talent that together makes them the most powerful Gwyn-Raven force yet to come. United they will confront the attackers face to face. I adore this whole set of books and try to read them once a year

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Damia's children is the third book in a series about a telepathic family and a very slow moving war with a beetle like people, who have a hive mentality. It is not a bad book but I must emphasize the slow moving aspect. By now we have moved into the third generation of this family. This book differs because while the other two books have focused mainly on one main character and her perspective love interest this one moved through several of the different children. They are likeable enough charac Damia's children is the third book in a series about a telepathic family and a very slow moving war with a beetle like people, who have a hive mentality. It is not a bad book but I must emphasize the slow moving aspect. By now we have moved into the third generation of this family. This book differs because while the other two books have focused mainly on one main character and her perspective love interest this one moved through several of the different children. They are likeable enough characters but I never really developed a close feeling to any one,just as soon as I started to become attached their story ended and they were only ever mentioned again in passing. Damia's children does however move along a bit faster and has much more action than the other two, but it is still pretty slow. There are two more books in this series and I will read them, probably pretty soon, but I am going to take a break for a little while and read something a bit more fast paced.

  12. 5 out of 5

    drowningmermaid

    I wanted to like this, as it is a return to my genre sci-fi roots, but I found this particular work quite disappointing. It's not really a book, more like 3-4 novellas strung together without any overarching point. I tossed this book while in jr. high, because I thought I had the "villain" in the second story figured out, but it turns out I was wrong... although the person it turned out to be, and the way the situation was resolved was trite and VERY easy to accomplish. Definitely a "quantity" rea I wanted to like this, as it is a return to my genre sci-fi roots, but I found this particular work quite disappointing. It's not really a book, more like 3-4 novellas strung together without any overarching point. I tossed this book while in jr. high, because I thought I had the "villain" in the second story figured out, but it turns out I was wrong... although the person it turned out to be, and the way the situation was resolved was trite and VERY easy to accomplish. Definitely a "quantity" read, not a "quality" read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Jaeger

    Re-reading all my Anne McCaffrey books. The first two titles in this series are the best--I think because each has a love story/deep emotional connection between two people. When it starts to break off into the 3rd generation's kids, and just follows their lives, I started to lose interest. Doesn't help that it's very very sci-fi, with tons of technical ship info and an insect-like invading alien. I'll get through the series, and then they're getting donated to the library.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tom Nixon

    A worthy sequel to Damia, Damia's Children actually has a little bit of a weird structure to it in many ways that both makes sense and sort of interrupts the flow of the story more than I'd like. First part is easy: we meet Damia, Afra and their many many kids- including Laria, the oldest- who, at 16 is set to go do some training and teaching on the Mrdini Homeworld of Clarf- before eventually taking over as Tower Prime on that world. While the Alliance between Mrdini and Humans looks to track do A worthy sequel to Damia, Damia's Children actually has a little bit of a weird structure to it in many ways that both makes sense and sort of interrupts the flow of the story more than I'd like. First part is easy: we meet Damia, Afra and their many many kids- including Laria, the oldest- who, at 16 is set to go do some training and teaching on the Mrdini Homeworld of Clarf- before eventually taking over as Tower Prime on that world. While the Alliance between Mrdini and Humans looks to track down the Hiver homeworld and all the other Hiver spheres to attempt to curb their colonial practices, Thian is seconded to a naval squadron as Prime. (He's second oldest behind Laria.) He helps discover live Hiver larvae on an abandoned sphere, but is attacked by a disaffected crewmember and inhibited Talent who considers him to sympathetic to the Hivers. He survives- and, unable to safely continue with the human ships due to militant sentiment goes with the Mrdini ship to confirm the location of the Hiver homeworld, which they figured out was destroyed by a supernova. (Hence, all the Hiver activity: they're trying to find a new homeworld.) Then, there's a time jump of a year. That feels random, but makes a certain amount of sense. Rojer (kiddo number three, also a Prime) and his father Afra go out to the fleet to bring back a captured Hiver sphere and they do so, but then Rojer- despite being slightly younger than Thian gets sent out to maintain a watching brief on Hiver occupied worlds. Zara (kiddo number four), turns out to be a problem child. Can't really do Tower Prime stuff, but might work out better as a healer- but she is affected on an empathic level by the captured Hiver queen they bring back-- and eventually sneaks over to the Moon Base and figures out that the Queen is freezing to death and saves her life. Everyone relizes then that Zara is def going to be better as a healer than a Tower Prime. Overall: the structure is both a little strange and makes sense- fairly decent sections of the book focus on each of 'Damia's Children' and while ONCE AGAIN, I'd like to see more of all the characters- there are two more books in the series, so you're not left totally short changed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kessily Lewel

    This is the third book in the Tower and the Hive series from the Pegasus universe. These books don't stand alone well so you should start with the Rowan at least, but the earlier books that set up the whole universe of talents and Primes would be useful to read as well. This book continues the trend that started with The Rowan, of focusing on a new generation with each book. We met the Rowan, then her daughter Damia, and now obviously we're meeting Damia's children with her husband Afra. Damia is This is the third book in the Tower and the Hive series from the Pegasus universe. These books don't stand alone well so you should start with the Rowan at least, but the earlier books that set up the whole universe of talents and Primes would be useful to read as well. This book continues the trend that started with The Rowan, of focusing on a new generation with each book. We met the Rowan, then her daughter Damia, and now obviously we're meeting Damia's children with her husband Afra. Damia is more prolific than her mother, and has produced, eight children, I believe. But with the end of the last book, we have met a new race of aliens, the Dinis and each of their children has been matched with a pair of young Dini and they've grown up together bringing their two races closer in understanding. This one mainly focuses on her oldest children who are now coming of age. Each one has their own focuses and interests but all of them are potentially prime level talents. It's one of my favorite books of this series and much better than the last book because the kids are a lot more likeable then their mother was as a teenager and I found the Dini species to be very interesting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Peter Curd

    I've gone back to reading the Tower and Hive series, a staple of my childhood, after maybe a decade. I've probably read all of these books at least 3 times before but I had forgotten most of the plot lines which is making this an enjoyable "first read" again. McCaffrey is at her sexist, dubious best in this series. The Talent parents "leaning" on their children to help their minds develop properly always felt fishy to me and it's no better now than it was when I last read them. I can see her poin I've gone back to reading the Tower and Hive series, a staple of my childhood, after maybe a decade. I've probably read all of these books at least 3 times before but I had forgotten most of the plot lines which is making this an enjoyable "first read" again. McCaffrey is at her sexist, dubious best in this series. The Talent parents "leaning" on their children to help their minds develop properly always felt fishy to me and it's no better now than it was when I last read them. I can see her point, these children are dangerous after all, but it's quite hard to read at times. Every character is a caricature and whilst it makes for quick, light reading - it's not very meaty! (view spoiler)[This book introduces the Mrdini race in detail and their introduction to the story fills a big void as the "pacifist" humans needed a kick to get themselves to treat the Hivers seriously. I think this race could do with more back story (and to a degree they get it in the next book, Lyon's Pride) to elevate them above McGuffins, but they are functional. (hide spoiler)] A fun read, but not your true Sci Fi!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Milewski

    Damia's Children (1993) by Anne McCaffrey continues her Tower and Hive series. Rather than pseodo-biographies of the title characters, this book is a series of novellas focusing of four of Damia's children. Rather than giving us a long, dull slog, this book gives us four snappy, shorter stories, forming an actual narrative arc. While still a little simplistic, as the general text and texture of the whole series is rather a throwback to 50's SF, the simpleness generally works better in the contex Damia's Children (1993) by Anne McCaffrey continues her Tower and Hive series. Rather than pseodo-biographies of the title characters, this book is a series of novellas focusing of four of Damia's children. Rather than giving us a long, dull slog, this book gives us four snappy, shorter stories, forming an actual narrative arc. While still a little simplistic, as the general text and texture of the whole series is rather a throwback to 50's SF, the simpleness generally works better in the context of a YA story. Because the galaxy doesn't depend on the actions of any one character, the story can follow more personal arcs, with each character finding a place by the end. Because the subject matter is generally lighter and fast, the book projects a far lighter and sprightly feel than the earlier volumes. Very little feels unnecessarily padded, events all seem reasonable, and everyone gets some chance to show off their cleverness. If you've gotten this far in the series, you'll find this title easy going.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Al Philipson

    The third book in McCaffrey's Tower series focuses on the adventures of some of Damia's children (she's been quite prolific). The Dini, an alien species, have joined up with the humans to fight the "Hive" race and several children have been reared together with infant Dini to help bridge the gap, especially the language gap, between the two races. Damia's children are part of that group. The stories are quite as good as the first two, but without as much angst. The pace is fine and the yarns are The third book in McCaffrey's Tower series focuses on the adventures of some of Damia's children (she's been quite prolific). The Dini, an alien species, have joined up with the humans to fight the "Hive" race and several children have been reared together with infant Dini to help bridge the gap, especially the language gap, between the two races. Damia's children are part of that group. The stories are quite as good as the first two, but without as much angst. The pace is fine and the yarns are engaging. The entire clan is there (The Rowan's descendants and their husbands) in supporting rolls. Definitely made me late to bed a few nights. I have one very small complaint. In one scene, one of the characters "ports" a captain from a Dini ship to a human ship. In the next scene the Dini skipper is quite surprised to find a "Talent" aboard the human ship. I assume McCaffrey wrote the two scenes at different times and forgot the discontinuity -- and her editors at Ace missed it as well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Continuing story, probably requires book 2 to understand context. This book keeps the story going of interacting with friendly and inscrutable/expanding aliens. This book and book 4 gives glimmers of interesting conundrums of how to handle interspecies contact, and human/alien morality problems. I don't own book 5 though, and reviews make me think that those problems aren't well explored in it, so... I'm going to stop this adventure with book 4.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate Millin

    Damia and Afra’s large family are all Talented, but are brought up in a loving family linked to the young of a new race called the Dini’s to help develop good relationships. When new space ships from the voracious Hive planets that take over planets killing everyone on them they are involved in the work done to find out where they have come from.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ulana

    This is a science fiction youth book that I had on my shelf. I had read Anne McCaffrey's dragon books years ago and enjoyed them. It took a while to get into this book, but once I did I liked the characters and their Talents.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Annette McIntyre

    Damia's children are growing into their power and must find their own way in life away from their powerfully talented parents.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gita

    My favorite of the series so far, perhaps partly because it stays more focused on the science fiction. Each of the children adds different experiences and perspectives.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Hassig

    Love Anne McCaffrey! As always Anne doesn't disappoint. Although I still prefer the dragonrider books this was also a good book from a good series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Williams

    Years ago, I met Ms. McCaffrey at a Seattle bookstore and she signed my copy of Damia. I must admit, I was a bigger fan of the Dragonrider's of Pern series, but these are fun, escapist fare as well.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marie J Cook

    Another favorite series As much as I love the Dragons of Pern , I also love this series too. FT&T are wonderful compelling stories and following the generations is fun. Another favorite series As much as I love the Dragons of Pern , I also love this series too. FT&T are wonderful compelling stories and following the generations is fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ruthie

    I know I've read this several times over the years. I have no clue how many times though lol

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Isn't it interesting the parallels between a future of telepathic people and how we are Zooming all over the place now?

  29. 4 out of 5

    April

    I have read this entire series many times, it's a favorite of mine. It was nice to visit it again!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    3rd book details the lives of the Rowan-Raven Talent's Dynasty's 3rd generation. Action picks up as contact with the Hive increases.

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