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Ultimate X-Men, Vol. 6: Return of the King

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Magneto, the X-Men's deadliest villain, returns. They've faced the Weapon X program, Proteus and even the superhuman strikeforce known as the Ultimates. Now, still licking their wounds from their prior battles, can Xavier's mutant team possibly survive the return of their most powerful foe? Starring all the X-Men that you met in movie - including Wolverine, Cyclops, Jean G Magneto, the X-Men's deadliest villain, returns. They've faced the Weapon X program, Proteus and even the superhuman strikeforce known as the Ultimates. Now, still licking their wounds from their prior battles, can Xavier's mutant team possibly survive the return of their most powerful foe? Starring all the X-Men that you met in movie - including Wolverine, Cyclops, Jean Grey and Storm. Collecting: Ultimate X-Men 26-33


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Magneto, the X-Men's deadliest villain, returns. They've faced the Weapon X program, Proteus and even the superhuman strikeforce known as the Ultimates. Now, still licking their wounds from their prior battles, can Xavier's mutant team possibly survive the return of their most powerful foe? Starring all the X-Men that you met in movie - including Wolverine, Cyclops, Jean G Magneto, the X-Men's deadliest villain, returns. They've faced the Weapon X program, Proteus and even the superhuman strikeforce known as the Ultimates. Now, still licking their wounds from their prior battles, can Xavier's mutant team possibly survive the return of their most powerful foe? Starring all the X-Men that you met in movie - including Wolverine, Cyclops, Jean Grey and Storm. Collecting: Ultimate X-Men 26-33

30 review for Ultimate X-Men, Vol. 6: Return of the King

  1. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Magneto is back and he's making sure everyone pays. With the X-Men without their leaders (Xavier and Cyclops) they do their best to prove they are still the good guys. On the flipside you have Magneto starting basically a new world, readying himself to kill billions of humans once more. Then have Xavier locked up making his moves, doing his best to try to help his X-Men. You also get to find out what happened with Cyclops and Wolverine back on the island. This is pretty long volume...abit too lo Magneto is back and he's making sure everyone pays. With the X-Men without their leaders (Xavier and Cyclops) they do their best to prove they are still the good guys. On the flipside you have Magneto starting basically a new world, readying himself to kill billions of humans once more. Then have Xavier locked up making his moves, doing his best to try to help his X-Men. You also get to find out what happened with Cyclops and Wolverine back on the island. This is pretty long volume...abit too long. This is Millar's last volume and I'm assuming he was trying his best to do a grand epic closure. Honestly though there was some padding here. Having Magneto tell his plan out was a bit boring for the 3rd time. And the X-Men made moves so slow it was weird. But when things did get going it was alot of fun. Mostly thanks to someone returning, a new x-Men member, and more. I wouldn't say it's the best ending but a solid ending for Millar's run. A 3.5 out of 5.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Great story. Great art. Cool guest stars. And X-Men who are damn interesting and intellectually stimulating without resorting to non-stop political preachiness.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    This trade paperback collects the last story arc of Mark Millar’s run on Ultimate X-Men. He is joined by artists Adam Kubert and David Finch. Millar launched the title with Kubert six paperback collections ago, it is fitting they finish their last story together. Millar started his version of the X-Men promisingly enough. I thought “Tomorrow People” was one of the best new X-Men stories of the new century. The follow up stories were good, but with room for improvement. My only knock was on the in This trade paperback collects the last story arc of Mark Millar’s run on Ultimate X-Men. He is joined by artists Adam Kubert and David Finch. Millar launched the title with Kubert six paperback collections ago, it is fitting they finish their last story together. Millar started his version of the X-Men promisingly enough. I thought “Tomorrow People” was one of the best new X-Men stories of the new century. The follow up stories were good, but with room for improvement. My only knock was on the inconsistent art, unlike the other titles in the Ultimate line, it had rotating cast of artist. Even Kubert, whose art appears on the majority of the issues, could barely finish an arc. Ultimate Spider-Man and Ultimates were career defining moments for its artists because they stayed for consecutive issues. The first arc worked because everything seemed new and Millar seemed willing to do stuff never before done with the X-Men. He made the X-Men in to celebrities getting their fifteen minutes on the tabloids and talk show circuit. He even had Professor Xavier kill Magneto in front of television cameras. But that was a ruse, Millar would never get rid of the main villain, he would return for the final arc. MIllar wraps most of his open subplots and leaves some for the new writer to build upon. Nothing really changed, he introduced a few new Ultimate versions of X-Men characters but still he returned it to status quo. The X-Men are back at their school and Magneto is plotting his next scheme, albeit in a non-metallic prison. It seemed the stories didn’t matter because nothing really stuck. Despite the initial promise, his run ends on a whimper. This is probably why X-Men fans are hating on Millar, but he did gave his own contribution to the mythos. He gave Cyclops a personality, made Jean Grey edgier and Colossus a metrosexual. He even introduces a post-human philosophy that espouses non-violence that sees mutants transcending the violent nature human never was able to wear off and inherited from cave-dwelling ancestors. This final arc could have been better, but Millar saved his best concepts for Ultimates. Ultimate X-Men would always be the little sister to Millar and Hitch’s opus. That was done in a grander scale; this however sputtered along and seemed never to take off.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Like the first volume of Ultimate X-Men, this is just another Magneto story that could have been done at any time, with any cast of characters, including the original, 616 band of merry marching mutants. It is, in fact, so much like so many Magneto stories that I've read that it simply lacked dramatic impact for me. But Millar does some very interesting things in making Xavier significantly more morally ambiguous than he's usually acknowledged to be. Just the suggestion that he may have manipula Like the first volume of Ultimate X-Men, this is just another Magneto story that could have been done at any time, with any cast of characters, including the original, 616 band of merry marching mutants. It is, in fact, so much like so many Magneto stories that I've read that it simply lacked dramatic impact for me. But Millar does some very interesting things in making Xavier significantly more morally ambiguous than he's usually acknowledged to be. Just the suggestion that he may have manipulated events to exactly this outcome is cool to think about. And that final outcome, with the X-Men positioned as an official governmental training school, could lead to some good and different stories. Millar did, eventually, lay down some good groundwork for future writers, but he could have gotten there a bit faster.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Millar's Ultimate X-men run was great stuff!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    Most X-Men writers get sloppier and harder to follow, as they introduce more characters into the story. Somehow Millar seems to be more focused as he adds a few more familiar X-Men faces to the roster of Ultimate X-Men, The Ultimates, and The Brotherhood of Evil Mutants. While this volume retains the blockbuster feel of The Ultimate War, we also get some interesting character beats, slightly less quippy dialogue, and a better understanding of many of the characters. There's also a scene near the Most X-Men writers get sloppier and harder to follow, as they introduce more characters into the story. Somehow Millar seems to be more focused as he adds a few more familiar X-Men faces to the roster of Ultimate X-Men, The Ultimates, and The Brotherhood of Evil Mutants. While this volume retains the blockbuster feel of The Ultimate War, we also get some interesting character beats, slightly less quippy dialogue, and a better understanding of many of the characters. There's also a scene near the end that X-2 or X-3 (it's been a while, I can't remember which) Heavily Borrowed From. We also get a Psylocke / Kwannon origin that makes A Hell Of A Lot More Sense than its regular Marvel Universe counterpart. This is a great X-book, and a fun Ultimate book to read. And if you were a fan of the late 80s roster of Uncanny X-Men / X-Force, you'll be pleased to see the new characters.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Much better than the previous volume, in my opinion, as the writing and the art seemed clearer, sharper. I do wonder if readers get a little tired of the rehash of conflicts and such, but I guess it is the nature of the genre, as there are always new readers picking up volumes in midstream. Sometimes to I weary of characters being viciously struck down in melees, but only to spring up and rejoin the fight. Also, I guess, part of the deal.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I really enjoyed this one again. Great action, great art (most of the way through), and a significantly suspenseful and meaningful storyline to keep it all going well. Sorry to see that it's the end of the run for this author and artist. Hopefully the next guys will do as well (though I've already heard they don't really). Ah well, this has been one of the most consistently enjoyable X-Men reads (all 6 volumes up to this point) that I've ever read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Millar's final volume. There's nothing I can add that I didn't say about volume 5, aside from the reveal that Wolverine let Cyclops die so he would he have a shot at Jean Grey is a weird plot/character choice. As is the call back to Beast being catfished by Blob. I mean, it was a plot point that partially moved us into this final arc, but, was bizarre and weird to bring back up.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    This volume really dragged along. The Magneto plot seemed unnecessarily complicated and lead to one of the longest "resolution after the slug fest" I've ever read. At the same time there isn't really much in the way of stage setting going forward.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Noah

    What an intriguing volume of issues. The setup from Ultimate War paid off well with high stakes and decent action followed by quite a lot of dialogue-enriched character development. This section is quite solid and has reinvigorated my interest in the Ultimate X-Men storyline.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marloges

    This focuses a lot on Magneto and the X-Men struggling with the Ultimates, so in a way this is a continuation of the Ultimate War... Since I love Magneto as a villian I obviously loved this a lot but I didn't really like the way Wolverine is depicted here.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sicily

    This was good the first time I read it, I guess. But after reading Xmen vs Avengers then reading this volume again. Well, it is kinda boring. It is the same lets get heroes to fight each other crap. Nothing special is happening here.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Still don't like where this story headed now that X-men is under SHIELD.

  15. 4 out of 5

    B

    Seems fine. The Wolverine/Cyclops story is probably the weirdest part of the whole thing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris W

    Average at best. Average magneto story, average ending, nothing really spectacular or original just kind of an average middle ground between movie and comic magneto.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ekenedilichukwu Ikegwuani

    the art in this is amazing and it feels intense and has real consequences

  18. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Stuff I Read – Ultimate X-Men #26-33 So this arc, titled “Return of the King,” feels like a kind of culmination of all the previous arcs, a kind of event in the way that Ultimate War really wasn’t an event. Here we have Magneto back in control of the Brotherhood while the X-Men are forced into hiding and Professor X is in captivity. So it begins with the feel that Professor X was wrong, and that despite his best efforts Magneto is going to go through with some doomsday plan to switch the planet’s Stuff I Read – Ultimate X-Men #26-33 So this arc, titled “Return of the King,” feels like a kind of culmination of all the previous arcs, a kind of event in the way that Ultimate War really wasn’t an event. Here we have Magneto back in control of the Brotherhood while the X-Men are forced into hiding and Professor X is in captivity. So it begins with the feel that Professor X was wrong, and that despite his best efforts Magneto is going to go through with some doomsday plan to switch the planet’s poles. Which the series recognizes is put fairly squarely on Professor X’s shoulders for not handing over Magneto before when he had the opportunity. The plot then proceeds and through battles and various shows of their powers and teamwork, the X-Men manage to stop Magneto and save the world and all that. So a big win for the X-Men. What I find most interesting about this arc, however, is that Magneto is set up as perhaps having changed during his time in Xavier’s rehabilitation. He is saving pieces of artwork and such so that it is not destroyed when Magneto destroys much of the human world. We also see that Magneto sort of sets himself up to fail, that his conviction is not really that certain, as he boasts instead of actually acting, which gives the X-Men time to thwart him. In a kind of Thanos in Infinity Gauntlet, Magneto never really comes off as the worst guy throughout. And, at the end, he shows some fatherly concern over his son, who he shot in the last arc. So a little conflicting, but perhaps indicating that no one is beyond redemption. And at least in this arc, at the end, the Professor seems to be working for equality, and mentions equal pay and over civil rights issues. Though a little late to appear in the series, it does shift my sympathies a little. Until, of course, I realize that when the Professor plays innocent when basically accused of orchestrating the entire thing as a way of telling Fury how paranoid he is, that sort of comes off as too true to ignore. I find myself siding with Fury, because that the Professor would say something like that implies that yes, he does seem to be behind everything, like he is pulling everyone’s strings. Indeed, at the end it is the Professor who pushes Jean past her safety zone so that she can access her full powers, so he is once again taking it upon himself to judge how far is too far and how far is acceptable. Like at the end of the Weapon X arc, this seems like it’s all going according to plan, like Xavier somehow foresaw every possibility and chose the one that the X-Men and the world are currently on. Which seems extremely suspect. If true, it means that he is including no one else in the planning or decision. It is only him. And no matter how good a person he might be, the fate of mutants and humans is too much for one man alone. How is the world supposed to trust him when he does not trust them? Fury basically brings up this point and all Xavier can say is that they must because he is right. Well, that is never good enough. I mean, it is possible that in any other scenario the loss of life would have been greater, or that mutants would be eradicated or something like that, but who is to say. By manipulating events like he seems to be doing, he is taking the choice away, assuming that humans and other mutants would get it wrong. But we have seen by this point that Xavier is not above mutants or humanity, as the events with his son have showed. No, instead Xavier comes off as too sure of himself and his own rightness, and that it leads to immense problems. He doesn’t relate well enough with people to understand them. Sure, he can pick apart their minds and force them to do what he commands, but he does not understand them and as such cannot trust them. And so, while this arc does make leaps to make mutants and the X-Men into more sympathetic characters, and surely more into heroes, it does not alleviate my feelings about the series as a whole having a rather negative outlook on people, showing humanity and mutants as so far gone that they lack the tools to save themselves and must rely on the wisdom and actions of others, like Xavier, to determine what is good for them and to act on their behalf. I simply do not want to believe that, because who, then, determines what is good. Just because Xavier got powers he is fit to make the decisions. It seems a bit like who watches the watchers. So while I can give this arc a higher mark, it still only gets a 7.5/10.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Edward Cheer

    Return of the King... Just let that sink in. This collection is titled... Return of the King. Why? The comic has nothing to do with Lord of the Rings, so I'm just going to guess the "King" that is "returning" would be Xavier, but even that is a bit of a stretch. But, I mean it's one of Millar's better issues. It still has plenty of problems littered through it. I do like how Magneto was significantly more intimidating since his first appearance, but again I think the whole world-is-in-crisis plot se Return of the King... Just let that sink in. This collection is titled... Return of the King. Why? The comic has nothing to do with Lord of the Rings, so I'm just going to guess the "King" that is "returning" would be Xavier, but even that is a bit of a stretch. But, I mean it's one of Millar's better issues. It still has plenty of problems littered through it. I do like how Magneto was significantly more intimidating since his first appearance, but again I think the whole world-is-in-crisis plot seems to early. The X-Men have been mainly focusing on local, smaller issues than the random bursts of saving all of America and now the world. Which would still raise the question, "Why are there people who want the X-Men gone, after they've saved their a**es?" This comic delves into more character development, specifically with Magneto and Cyclops, both of which I liked. The portions that focuses on them, their backstories, or whatever they were currently going through were well-written, and I enjoyed learning more about them. That being said, there are still plenty of dumb moments in this comics. One specific moment is the entire conversation Beast has with his parents. Everything in that conversation was awkward, forced, and ultimately cringe-inducing. Yes, Mark, this is how people really act around each other. Well, Millar's finally gone. I can't wait to see what Bendis has in store for the series, but to be fair Millar has made far worse than these six comics. I won't go back and re-read them, but I still enjoyed what I read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Bleegh! Mark Millar's Ultimate X-Men is bad. It's boring and contains some terrible dialog. To me, Millar's a "Big Picture" writer because he overuses the ideas of grandeur, epic, and awesome for his stories. The chapters routinely have a "WOW" or dramatic action scene that would be at home with any summer Hollywood blockbuster and just as dumb. There's nothing really new with the characters except surface changes, so it leaves readers wondering how, why, and what's the point to all of this. The Bleegh! Mark Millar's Ultimate X-Men is bad. It's boring and contains some terrible dialog. To me, Millar's a "Big Picture" writer because he overuses the ideas of grandeur, epic, and awesome for his stories. The chapters routinely have a "WOW" or dramatic action scene that would be at home with any summer Hollywood blockbuster and just as dumb. There's nothing really new with the characters except surface changes, so it leaves readers wondering how, why, and what's the point to all of this. The chance to make new unrestricted continuity using templates of established characters seems to be the idea behind the Ultimate universe. Unfortunately for Millar's Ultimate X-Men, the characters and the stories seem all to close to their mainstream progenitors and history. Sure there's a small difference here and there, but I always imagined the Ultimate Universe as having a more distinct personality than being almost a "What if.." clone. Millar's Ultimates is better at creating that difference in universes and is just executed better in general. I pick this up on a whim. While stopping in at the library to pick up items on hold, I popped over to the graphic novels and saw a huge run of Ultimate X-Men trade paperbacks. Impulsively, I checked all of them out, thinking I could read a huge chunk of the series in a very close and short setting. I guess we'll see how far I make it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Christman

    Millar's run on Ultimate X-Men was really up and down. The highlights were clearly the Tomorrow People, Proteus and Gambit Arcs. The rest was somewhat forgettable, including his final volume: Return of the King. Having read it just a few days ago, I struggle to even remember what happened. His Ultimate War crossover that led up to this issue was much more memorable and inspired. Millar, going along with what others have surmised, is an author more suited to pen the Ultimates. Big picture plots an Millar's run on Ultimate X-Men was really up and down. The highlights were clearly the Tomorrow People, Proteus and Gambit Arcs. The rest was somewhat forgettable, including his final volume: Return of the King. Having read it just a few days ago, I struggle to even remember what happened. His Ultimate War crossover that led up to this issue was much more memorable and inspired. Millar, going along with what others have surmised, is an author more suited to pen the Ultimates. Big picture plots and big action is what he does best... and I think he struggles with the X-Men because there's just so many beloved characters that demand development. I'm looking forward to the rest of the line with Bendis and some new authors making some contributions.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leila Anani

    Magneto's back and plans to wipe out humanity now he has a power amplifier created by the mutant Forge. Xavier's been captured by S.H.I.E.L.D and Wolverine betrayed Cyclops and left him for dead in the Savage Land so that he could have another shot with Jean. Without it's leaders the X-Men are fractured and outnumbered and also as much the target for S.H.I.E.L.D as the Brotherhood & Magneto - does humanity have any hope at all? So this is the Ultimate universe's take on the Magneto story arc - It Magneto's back and plans to wipe out humanity now he has a power amplifier created by the mutant Forge. Xavier's been captured by S.H.I.E.L.D and Wolverine betrayed Cyclops and left him for dead in the Savage Land so that he could have another shot with Jean. Without it's leaders the X-Men are fractured and outnumbered and also as much the target for S.H.I.E.L.D as the Brotherhood & Magneto - does humanity have any hope at all? So this is the Ultimate universe's take on the Magneto story arc - It's fairly solid, but if you're an X-Man fan doesn't really give you anything you haven't seen before other than a darker, edgier Wolverine and a camper Colossus - I do love the scene where he goes mental when someone attacks Wolverine. Good, but not my favourite.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex Hern

    A strong ending to Millar's run on Ultimate X-Men. The action is spot on, which isn't a surprise given his collaborators are Finch and Kubert, but he also gives the characters strong emotional beats and real conclusions, which is rarer for him. Unlike a lot of authors runs on mainstream comics, this is an ending, as well. Sure, it leaves room for a 'sequel' - which started the next month - but it doesn't have any hanging plot threads, and if you stopped reading Ultimate X-Men with Volume 6, you' A strong ending to Millar's run on Ultimate X-Men. The action is spot on, which isn't a surprise given his collaborators are Finch and Kubert, but he also gives the characters strong emotional beats and real conclusions, which is rarer for him. Unlike a lot of authors runs on mainstream comics, this is an ending, as well. Sure, it leaves room for a 'sequel' - which started the next month - but it doesn't have any hanging plot threads, and if you stopped reading Ultimate X-Men with Volume 6, you'd feel complete. But you'd also miss on Bendis and Vaughn's runs, and that would be a shame.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Davy

    In the final chapter - with a great storyline on Cyclops - Magneto tries to build his kingdom and destroy the world (and where have the Ultimates gone ?). Millar's view on the X-men evolving from young, "innocent" mutants struggling with their powers to become the fearsome fighters is quite original. Although the entire 6 comics are not always the same quality (especially Hellfire&Brimstone was weak). I'm glad I bought all issues second-hand, because it's not really Millar's best take on superhe In the final chapter - with a great storyline on Cyclops - Magneto tries to build his kingdom and destroy the world (and where have the Ultimates gone ?). Millar's view on the X-men evolving from young, "innocent" mutants struggling with their powers to become the fearsome fighters is quite original. Although the entire 6 comics are not always the same quality (especially Hellfire&Brimstone was weak). I'm glad I bought all issues second-hand, because it's not really Millar's best take on superheroes (especially compared to the first volumes of The Ultimates).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Russio

    Having bowed out at Uncanny #300, I approached this (my son's book) with some trepidation: this wasn't Claremont after all. Well. I am please to say that this seeming reboot resurrects enough of the valuable story matter to make this worthy and the plot chicanes between typical mayhem and soap opera in a pleasingly familiar way. Having dragged the wonderful, and previously banished Collossus, Nightcrawler and Shadowcat back into the fold, this does (some might say a little cynically) know what p Having bowed out at Uncanny #300, I approached this (my son's book) with some trepidation: this wasn't Claremont after all. Well. I am please to say that this seeming reboot resurrects enough of the valuable story matter to make this worthy and the plot chicanes between typical mayhem and soap opera in a pleasingly familiar way. Having dragged the wonderful, and previously banished Collossus, Nightcrawler and Shadowcat back into the fold, this does (some might say a little cynically) know what people like and it gives it to them. A success.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leandro

    What can I say? I'm a sucker for big scale conflicts and movie-like dialogues and this volume has plenty of those. So what if the status quo is almost unaffected? What I enjoy about comics is a good plot and well written characters, and I feel these two aspects are well covered here. This is a fitting end to Mark Millar's run, in which he successfully condensed and modernized some of the X-Men's most famous storylines and plot points.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    4.5 stars! This is the exact kind of big battle type issue I wanted to read, where the fight scenes are all fantastically thought out and well-drawn, while still having character development within this volume. Truly the only thing I didn't care about was the like 4 pages showing Cyclops in the Savage Land. Every other bit of this comic was perfect, especially the planning by Magnetic and the conversation between him and Professor Xavier.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    I love seeing Magneto as a megalomaniac and trying to institute his Ultimatum Wave earlier in the series. The fight between the X-men and the Brotherhood made me want to continue reading. I love the mystery behind Jean gaining control over the Phoenix powers...I am really curious to see where this leads.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jedhua

    Other Useful Reviews: Sesana's review Book Info: This collection contains Ultimate X-Men issues #26-33. ABSOLUTE RATING: {2.5+/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: Other Useful Reviews: Sesana's review Book Info: This collection contains Ultimate X-Men issues #26-33. ABSOLUTE RATING: {2.5+/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: <3/5 stars>

  30. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I love everything Marvel. The storylines are incredible! They have everything you could want: action, adventure, comedy, romance, political intrigue, allegories, metaphors, etc. Some stories drag, some end too soon.

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