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Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451: The Authorized Graphic Novel: The Authorized Adaptation

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""Monday burn Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner, burn 'em to ashes, then burn the ashes."" For Guy Montag, a career fireman for whom kerosene is perfume, this is not just an official slogan. It is a mantra, a duty, a way of life in a tightly monitored world where thinking is dangerous and books are forbidden. In 1953, Ray Bradbury envisioned one of the world's mos ""Monday burn Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner, burn 'em to ashes, then burn the ashes."" For Guy Montag, a career fireman for whom kerosene is perfume, this is not just an official slogan. It is a mantra, a duty, a way of life in a tightly monitored world where thinking is dangerous and books are forbidden. In 1953, Ray Bradbury envisioned one of the world's most unforgettable dystopian futures, and in "Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451," the artist Tim Hamilton translates this frightening modern masterpiece into a gorgeously imagined graphic novel. As could only occur with Bradbury's full cooperation in this authorized adaptation, Hamilton has created a striking work of art that uniquely captures Montag's awakening to the evil of government-controlled thought and the inestimable value of philosophy, theology, and literature. Including an original foreword by Ray Bradbury and fully depicting the brilliance and force of his canonic and beloved masterwork, "Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451" is an exceptional, haunting work of graphic literature.


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""Monday burn Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner, burn 'em to ashes, then burn the ashes."" For Guy Montag, a career fireman for whom kerosene is perfume, this is not just an official slogan. It is a mantra, a duty, a way of life in a tightly monitored world where thinking is dangerous and books are forbidden. In 1953, Ray Bradbury envisioned one of the world's mos ""Monday burn Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner, burn 'em to ashes, then burn the ashes."" For Guy Montag, a career fireman for whom kerosene is perfume, this is not just an official slogan. It is a mantra, a duty, a way of life in a tightly monitored world where thinking is dangerous and books are forbidden. In 1953, Ray Bradbury envisioned one of the world's most unforgettable dystopian futures, and in "Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451," the artist Tim Hamilton translates this frightening modern masterpiece into a gorgeously imagined graphic novel. As could only occur with Bradbury's full cooperation in this authorized adaptation, Hamilton has created a striking work of art that uniquely captures Montag's awakening to the evil of government-controlled thought and the inestimable value of philosophy, theology, and literature. Including an original foreword by Ray Bradbury and fully depicting the brilliance and force of his canonic and beloved masterwork, "Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451" is an exceptional, haunting work of graphic literature.

30 review for Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451: The Authorized Graphic Novel: The Authorized Adaptation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    There are some books that are so deep that you look forward to how other people interpret their core message - just to make sure that you did not miss anything. Fahrenheit 451 is such a book and this adaptation helped me to visualize several scenes that I was a little 'fuzzy' about. The introduction by Ray Bradbury is wonderful - the art is atmospheric; even the panel spacing conveys a feeling of being trapped in a world that has lost any semblance of sanity.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    This is Ray Bradbury's authorised adaptation of his classic novel Fahrenheit 451 into a graphic novel illustrated by Tim Hamilton. In his introduction, Ray Bradbury says that he views this as yet another take on his original book - a "further rejuvenation", as he terms it. He can trace many elements of the story to ideas that had been percolating in his subconscious. The first was an occasion when he was taking a walk around the block, and was stopped and questioned by a police officer. The idea This is Ray Bradbury's authorised adaptation of his classic novel Fahrenheit 451 into a graphic novel illustrated by Tim Hamilton. In his introduction, Ray Bradbury says that he views this as yet another take on his original book - a "further rejuvenation", as he terms it. He can trace many elements of the story to ideas that had been percolating in his subconscious. The first was an occasion when he was taking a walk around the block, and was stopped and questioned by a police officer. The idea of being challenged for merely being a pedestrian took root. He also references an early story he wrote entitled "The Exiles", in which the greatest Fantasy authors in history were exiled to Mars, while their books were burned on Earth. Another story, "Usher II", was about a writer of Fantasy being made fun of by intellectuals, who ridiculed all the grotesques of Edgar Allan Poe. In "Pillar of Fire", a man rose from the dead to reenact "Dracula" and Frankenstein's monster. Bradbury states, "I brought all my characters onstage again and ran them through my typewriter, letting my fingers tell the stories and bring forth the ghosts of other tales from other times… What you have here now is a pastiche of my former lives, my former fears, my inhibitions and my strange and mysterious and unrecognized predictions of the future…what I did was name a metaphor and let myself run free, allowing my subconscious to surface with all kinds of wild ideas." Fahrenheit 451 lends itself surprisingly well to reinterpretation as a graphic novel. Of course with a superior tale such as this, the piece is bound to be story-led. Nevertheless the Artwork in this book is more than adequate, and adds another dimension to the story. It is a nice touch too that the reader is able not merely to visualise the books to be burned, but to actually see images of them! Most pages are predominantly yellow/reds, or cool blue/grey-greens with silhouettes in the after-dark periods, to enhance the mood. The story is as gripping as ever, and the characters declaim well in this stark medium, their speeches being undistracted by superfluous words, and the emotional power behind them heightened by the visual images. An enjoyable read, and a very good choice to be interpreted as a graphic novel.

  3. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    This is a mind-boggling novel. Because of television and other forms of entertainment, the people begin to hate reading books. Then when a controversy happens regarding some writings, the government decides to burn all books. Owning and reading books thus become prohibited. Penalty is death. Farenheit 451 is a 1953 dystopian work by Ray Bradbury. My first by him. The writing is ordinary but the idea, although scary, is engaging. Maybe because I love to read and I would not want all my books to bu This is a mind-boggling novel. Because of television and other forms of entertainment, the people begin to hate reading books. Then when a controversy happens regarding some writings, the government decides to burn all books. Owning and reading books thus become prohibited. Penalty is death. Farenheit 451 is a 1953 dystopian work by Ray Bradbury. My first by him. The writing is ordinary but the idea, although scary, is engaging. Maybe because I love to read and I would not want all my books to burn. There is a scene here where an old lady chooses to die instead of burning her books. I thought I would do the same if and when this happened in real life. I love my books! Especially those that I've read already and chose to keep for sentimental reasons. The title is believed to be the temperature when paper can auto-ignite, i.e., burn by itself. Since mine was an illustrated edition or graphic novel, the reading was a breeze. Although, the illustrations were not really something to marvel at. They were all dark and gloomy basically reflecting the mood and theme of the novel. But there were lengthy narratives too since maybe the illustrator wanted to capture the distinctive prose of Bradbury. I liked this novel since it highlighted the idiocy or "partial information devoid of context" of watching television. Readers should celebrate that, there was once upon a time, Ray Bradbury, who rallied behind the importance of reading written works of art instead of watching senseless television shows. I would imagine that in the 50's, not many people enjoyed having this pointed out to them. Ray Bradbury did not think though that time will come that physical books will dwindle in number to give way to e-books. Well, police can still burn e-book machines. And because they are very costly, I will not be surprised if some people here in the Philippines will indeed choose to be killed instead of burning their e-book readers!

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    This is a solid adaptation of Bradbury's classic dystopian novel in part about censorship, the plot of which I won't repeat, since there are thousands of reviews on the original novel page. I will say that rereading it in this format reminded me of the horror/thrill of reading about the memorization of all the great books in resistance. I've read and taught the book many times, so appreciate the introduction by Bradbury authorizing the adaptation. That endorsement was probably necessary, since i This is a solid adaptation of Bradbury's classic dystopian novel in part about censorship, the plot of which I won't repeat, since there are thousands of reviews on the original novel page. I will say that rereading it in this format reminded me of the horror/thrill of reading about the memorization of all the great books in resistance. I've read and taught the book many times, so appreciate the introduction by Bradbury authorizing the adaptation. That endorsement was probably necessary, since it might seem ironic that a book taking away many of Bradbury's actual words--which might seem like a kind of censorship--would be published with his blessing. The introduction to a later edition of Bradbury's novel details the remarkable story of his reading some of his book to a high school audience; he had forgotten his own copy, so read a copy borrowed from the classroom set. In reading it, he was chilled to realize that the publishers that had produced a generation of copies of his book had indeed censored it--taken out the swearing--which is especially outrageous in a book about state control of language. But Bradbury's introduction to Hamilton's edition makes it clear that Bradbury's own story developed and grew in various forms, from an anecdote to a sketch to a short story to a novel. And a 1966 film version by Truffaut that he liked (and I have seen and taught). So this is just another version, and a good one, but it should not be read instead of the original, only in conjunction with it, as a way into it for struggling readers, maybe, or as an alternate interpretation of it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    "This book has pores. It has features . . . detail, fresh detail. The good writers touch life often. You see why books are hated and feared? They show the pores in the face of life." -- Faber Here's a blasphemous statement -- I enjoyed this graphic novel version more than the text edition. Before you suggest Ray Bradbury is turning over in his grave at this idea, consider that ten years ago he partnered with artist Tim Hamilton (who has worked for Marvel, DC and other big names) to produce this ed "This book has pores. It has features . . . detail, fresh detail. The good writers touch life often. You see why books are hated and feared? They show the pores in the face of life." -- Faber Here's a blasphemous statement -- I enjoyed this graphic novel version more than the text edition. Before you suggest Ray Bradbury is turning over in his grave at this idea, consider that ten years ago he partnered with artist Tim Hamilton (who has worked for Marvel, DC and other big names) to produce this edition of his 50's-era sci-fi classic. Hamilton's noir-like illustrations - mostly muted colors, except for the red-hot fires, and A LOT of darkness - complement Bradbury's prose and ideas. The story is probably as timely as ever, but is well-known by now so I won't rehash it in a review. I remember in childhood there used to be a book series called 'Illustrated Classics,' which adapted, in a straight-forward and usually boring manner, novels from the 18th and 19th centuries. The striking style of Fahrenheit 451, as presented here, is the really way those should have been done.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    "Remember, Montag. We're the happiness boys. We stand against the small tide of those who want to make everyone unhappy with conflicting theory and thought." Montag works as a fireman. But not the kind we all know and love. His job is to burn books. That is all he does. Burn books and sometimes the people who (illegally) have them. But what happens when his eyes are opened to what life has become? That is the rest of the story. I've read the original novel and I've seen the movie, so I could hardl "Remember, Montag. We're the happiness boys. We stand against the small tide of those who want to make everyone unhappy with conflicting theory and thought." Montag works as a fireman. But not the kind we all know and love. His job is to burn books. That is all he does. Burn books and sometimes the people who (illegally) have them. But what happens when his eyes are opened to what life has become? That is the rest of the story. I've read the original novel and I've seen the movie, so I could hardly pass up this version. And it is an excellent one, in my opinion. The artwork fits the narration perfectly, creating the exact mood you should be in when reading this book. I was impressed. Ray Bradbury wrote an introduction for this 2009 edition, and at the end he asks any reader of this book to think about which book they would 'become' if the need arose. I have been thinking about that very thing, and it is actually a difficult question to answer, especially for a person who loves books the way I do. Do I become one of the deep intellectual classics that have led Mankind over the centuries? Since Mankind hasn't really paid attention to any of them, there doesn't seem much point to that. What makes me think Man as a whole would ever learn from them if he hasn't already? So would I pick a lighter weight classic? One of the great novels of our past, the kind that are on all those lists of books we are supposed to read before we die? Tempting, but how many other people would be thinking the same thing? I would want to be unique, wouldn't you? I've narrowed my choices down to four. I have my reasons for each one, but it is hard to decide on just one even for a mental exercise like this. I would be either Black Beauty, Cyrano de Bergerac, The Autobiography of a Pocket Handkerchief, or Fahrenheit 451. And you? Which book would you be?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ferdy

    The artwork was good, but everything else wasn't — the premise, the story, and the characters were all rubbish. I didn't buy the whole book burning, firemen, and media brainwashing that was going on. Very little made sense especially the majority of the population being cool with not thinking for themselves, not wanting to read books, not questioning the war. It was all so far fetched and unrealistic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    André

    Fahrenheit 451 is one of those novels that doesn't require any introduction. This dystopian novel totally deserved a spot in the graphic novel format, for its disturbing content. Tim Hamilton, the comic adaptor, successfully conveys the dark images of the book into an illustrated edition. Just like the 1966 film by Truffaut, this is another version of this powerful masterpiece. Haunting, disturbing, and thought-provoking, Fahrenheit 451 is a compelling work that makes any reader to reflect. The Fahrenheit 451 is one of those novels that doesn't require any introduction. This dystopian novel totally deserved a spot in the graphic novel format, for its disturbing content. Tim Hamilton, the comic adaptor, successfully conveys the dark images of the book into an illustrated edition. Just like the 1966 film by Truffaut, this is another version of this powerful masterpiece. Haunting, disturbing, and thought-provoking, Fahrenheit 451 is a compelling work that makes any reader to reflect. The comic adaptation presents a gorgeous artwork and captures the most important concepts of Bradbury's work. The design is quite edgy and mysterious, which helps the reader to envision a disconcerting dystopian society. Consequently, this graphic novel enhances the mental images from the original book by Bradbury. Hamilton's comic adaptation should be read as a conjunction to the original read. rating: 4.5/5 stars

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vikas

    I had heard a lot about Fahrenheit 451 and its dark story for I wouldn't want to live in a world without books. But before I could read the book or watch the movie I got to read this Graphic Novel adaption of the novel. This has been authorized by Ray Bradbury. The artwork is dystopian like it had to be and overall I liked it why are here so many negative reviews for the book probably I would understand that after reading the book. But till then as my first introduction to Ray Bradbury's dystopi I had heard a lot about Fahrenheit 451 and its dark story for I wouldn't want to live in a world without books. But before I could read the book or watch the movie I got to read this Graphic Novel adaption of the novel. This has been authorized by Ray Bradbury. The artwork is dystopian like it had to be and overall I liked it why are here so many negative reviews for the book probably I would understand that after reading the book. But till then as my first introduction to Ray Bradbury's dystopian world I really liked this graphic novel. Would read the book and watch the movie soon enough. I have always loved comics, and I hope that I will always love them. Even though I grew up reading local Indian comics like Raj Comics or Diamond Comics or even Manoj Comics, now's the time to catch up on the international and classic comics and Graphic novels. I am on my quest to read as many comics as I can. I Love comics to bit, may comics never leave my side. I loved reading this and love reading more, you should also read what you love and then just Keep on Reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ally Adams

    What a disgrace to Ray Bradbury. This book is the exact opposite of what it should be. Fahrenheit 451 is about books that burn and terrible censorship. Is this not ironic that it is a shortened, empty version of this complex novel? This graphic novel is easy to read, which is what Bradbury advises against (cultures that take the easy way out of reading will be destroyed). It requires almost no thought to sit down and read this for thirty minutes, and the reader will most likely not retrieve any What a disgrace to Ray Bradbury. This book is the exact opposite of what it should be. Fahrenheit 451 is about books that burn and terrible censorship. Is this not ironic that it is a shortened, empty version of this complex novel? This graphic novel is easy to read, which is what Bradbury advises against (cultures that take the easy way out of reading will be destroyed). It requires almost no thought to sit down and read this for thirty minutes, and the reader will most likely not retrieve any central aspects or themes of the text. It is almost as if our culture is becoming that of Montag's; publishers and schools are beginning to study these types of novels because it is easy and requires almost no thinking. It is especially terrible that a book of this magnitude was turned into a monstrosity that completely turns around the author's message.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Licha

    I read the book when I was in 7th grade, a very looong time ago. How scary to live in a world where books are banned and burned and anyone caught with a book is arrested or burned right along with their books and home. This people are so empty that their entertainment is dictated by some invisible government. They gather at friends' homes to watch the televised walls. Their memories of loved ones are also played on the wall as a picture in a frame would be in our home. I found this to be the sca I read the book when I was in 7th grade, a very looong time ago. How scary to live in a world where books are banned and burned and anyone caught with a book is arrested or burned right along with their books and home. This people are so empty that their entertainment is dictated by some invisible government. They gather at friends' homes to watch the televised walls. Their memories of loved ones are also played on the wall as a picture in a frame would be in our home. I found this to be the scariest of all, that your memories could be dictated in such a way. The story played well to this format, but the graphics were not so great. A lot of faces were undefined and the images hard to read at times.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This book was a little confusing. It was a good plot idea, but I thought some of the dialogue seemed like filler. It ended on a cliffhanger, but if there is a book two, I'm not going to buy it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have a vague idea of how I came to read this. My dad and I were discussing science fiction and science fantasy, and at some point, it was agreed I would sample something from the sci-fi genre to see how it was written. Something to do with my roots being in the fantasy genre. For all I know, I may have read some sci-fi books before and forgotten it, or was unaware the genre was sci-fi, but ah well, Fahrenheit 451 was always said to be a must-read, and it just so happened my dad had the graphic I have a vague idea of how I came to read this. My dad and I were discussing science fiction and science fantasy, and at some point, it was agreed I would sample something from the sci-fi genre to see how it was written. Something to do with my roots being in the fantasy genre. For all I know, I may have read some sci-fi books before and forgotten it, or was unaware the genre was sci-fi, but ah well, Fahrenheit 451 was always said to be a must-read, and it just so happened my dad had the graphic novel on his computer. ---- 1st quarter of the GN, my thoughts were: Wow. Really pretty. The art work is fantastic. How clever Ray Bradbury is! A new play on the word "fireman". (Then) A girl is introduced, Clarisse. She's pretty. What's she for? I wonder if at some point in the novel the main character, the fireman, Guy Montag and her get together. (And soon after) Oh no, what have I gotten into...the whole novel is a dialog between the two isn't it? Just constant gibber jabber, and in the process he discovers himself. Ooh, look, it's Mildred, Guy's wife. Empty pill bottle on the floor. Has she conveniently committed suicide, so he can hang out with Clarisse more? Oh. Apparently not. A couple of technicians save the day, and guess what? Mrs. Montag is probably going to do it again. (Later) Fortunately, this is a graphic novel, and a few pictures of Guy and Clarisse talking can be crafted to span over a few days. 2nd quarter: Captain Beatty, Guy's boss, is looks creepy--Jack Nicholson could play him no problem. Oh no. Clarisse is dead. Unfortunately, I didn't really form an attachment to her so I didn't mind much, but apparently, Guy Montag does. As Captain Beatty slowly revealed why they go to such great lengths to destroy books and why they've made the possession of books a criminal offense, I was reminded of the present state of the world now, and what he said in 1951 is still true today: what we read does truly affect the way we think. It is how we excel and it is what makes us different from everyone around us. Our thoughts are all different, our opinions, even the way we think is different, and it's mostly because of the books we read. In Ray Bradbury's dystopia, "Happiness" is a tool the government uses to suppress the voices of the people. "Happiness" is what ensures they stay in power. "The family", some sort of holographic program, is what has replaced real human relationships. It distracts people from the world around them, removes the necessity of companionship, removes worry, and detaches them from everything else. The "Happiness" that "the family" offers is false, but everyone is too numbed to notice. The government remains in power, unopposed, because the people are ignorant, living in shells. 3rd quarter: A year has passed in the novel, but I didn't notice. Anyway, in that time, Guy Montag has hidden dozens of books on the sly. He remembers a man he met one time, an old dude. Apparently, Guy Montag found this old dude, what's his name, ah yes, Faber, having books in his possession. So he forms a sort of alliance with this Faber dude, who had for some reason, come to possess an small ear-piece which he uses to remain in contact with Montag. Faber...is not one of the best characters I've seen. He's spineless, he's hesitant to help, he doesn't really do anything, he just sits around and waits for it all to be over. And he's annoying. But I guess, Faber represents the silent minority. Those who sit by and watch while the world burns. Some form of literary debate goes on between Captain Beatty and Captain Beatty. Apparently, he's using a debate he had in a "dream" as an allegory to try to turn Montag, to confuse and befuddle him. I was...not impressed by the debate itself, but I was impressed however, by the knowledge of books that Captain Beatty possessed. For someone who outlawed the act of reading books, he sure spouted a lot of quotes. They receive an emergency dispatch call and the firemen, Montag included, hasten to the the location (before the bad people can hide the books), only to find that it's Montag's house they stop at. Mildred. Evil witch woman. But then it's revealed that Captain Beatty knew about it his secret stash all along, and orders Montag to burn his own house down with a flamethrower. And Montag does it, too! THEN, his ear piece falls out accidentally, and oh bugger, Captain B picks it up, and he threatens to trace it back to old Faber. Note to self: Don't threaten people armed with flame throwers. Of course, to protect his friend, Montag kills Captain Beatty, and destroys a mechanical dog and flees as a fugitive. He also discovers that not all the books were destroyed after all. Yay, for him. 4th quarter: Faber's house. They discuss planting books in the houses of other firemen, which I got really excited about, but nothing happened. Instead, the TV comes on to say that some new mechanical dogs are gonna be shipped in to track Montag by his scent. So now, Faber is on the lam, too. So, Montag gets away, yada yada, and meets a bunch of vagabonds. And it becomes clear once again what a twisted world it is to have professors and scholars living on the streets instead of the real bad guys, whom apparently, no longer exist because they're at home "being happy". These professors have made it their lives' mission to memorize entire books, human-libraries if you will. They then burn the books to avoid being arrested. Meanwhile, some innocent dude is killed and the public is told that the dude is Montag, because the government just can't admit they were beaten. Jet bombers fly over the place and destroy the whole city with nuclear bombs. It's implied that this happens everywhere as well, and it is assumed Mildred is dead. The end. Now, I was pretty happy with the first 3 quarters of the graphic novel, I really was! It was a fabulous "what if" concept, Ray Bradbury is brilliant and Tim Hamilton is an amazing illustrator. However, I felt the ending was a bit of a cop-out. Too short, too sudden, too hurried. I was left with the thought, 'That's it?? The end? No more?' It's a bit like that birthday where your relative gives you a huge wrapped present, and you're all hyped up about it because it's just gi-normous and you can hardly wait to open it. You're thinking about it all through the party, and when it's time to open the presents, you rush to that one first. You're clawing at the wrapping paper and someone records you squealing at the sight of the cover of the box because it's that Wii you always wanted! Then you open the box, and you discover that it isn't a Wii, it's a plain white T and a fabric dye set that aforementioned relative tells you "Now you can paint whatever you want on it! See! Isn't it cool?" Anyhew, 3 stars for great concept!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kane

    This graphic adaptation of Fahrenheit 451 is best read in addition to the original novel. It could never replace the flowery language and beautiful imagery presented in its original form. However, the artistic renderings of each frame do a lovely job of presenting the dark material, shadowy intentions of the characters, and the brilliance of the flames. After reading the original, this graphic version adds new layers, highlighting the significance of specific moments. This is a glimpse into the This graphic adaptation of Fahrenheit 451 is best read in addition to the original novel. It could never replace the flowery language and beautiful imagery presented in its original form. However, the artistic renderings of each frame do a lovely job of presenting the dark material, shadowy intentions of the characters, and the brilliance of the flames. After reading the original, this graphic version adds new layers, highlighting the significance of specific moments. This is a glimpse into the world that could clarify the story for some struggling readers. Of course, it's hard to read without considering Beatty's apt and rambling critique of our own society: "Then in the twentieth century, speed up your camera. Books cut shorter. Condensations. Digests. Tabloids... Classics cut to fit fifteen-minute radio shows, then again to fill a two-minute book column, winding up at last as a ten- or twelve-line dictionary resume." Like Beatty, "I exaggerate, of course", when claiming that this is doing the same thing to the original Fahrenheit 451. Although this is an authorized reimagining of the original text that has an intro by Bradbury, I would still warn against using this as a substitute for the original. Instead, it is an incredible supplement.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This is a serviceable version of the classic science-fiction Bradbury novel but should not serve as a replacement for the original, full-length novel. The characterizations sometimes seemed spot on, other times seemed to miss their mark: for example, Clarisse doesn't have the depth and intelligence she should have and comes off as a bit of a sex-pot, which struck me as inaccurate. Beatty, on the other hand, seems as steady and unswerving in Hamilton's comic as he does in Bradbury's text. There a This is a serviceable version of the classic science-fiction Bradbury novel but should not serve as a replacement for the original, full-length novel. The characterizations sometimes seemed spot on, other times seemed to miss their mark: for example, Clarisse doesn't have the depth and intelligence she should have and comes off as a bit of a sex-pot, which struck me as inaccurate. Beatty, on the other hand, seems as steady and unswerving in Hamilton's comic as he does in Bradbury's text. There are some good portraits of Millie, which lend us hints about the great fear and uncertainty that she lives with on a daily basis. Montag's intensity and desire for truth grows over the course of the novel, which I suppose is as it should be. One of the tenets of Fahrenheit 451 is that reading (and walking and good conversation) takes time, patience, thought and introspection. So having the story sort of rushed through in a graphic form arguably works against those principles. But I imagine that if this text were used as an extension activity, such as a follow-up to a thorough study of Bradbury's book, there would be much to be gained from it and many students would enjoy it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly

    I tried reading the original of this novel sometime ago but I stopped. I believe I stopped at that point, not too far from the beginning, where two characters, conversing, made it like a forgotten myth that firemen used to put out fires, not like what they are now: police-like professionals who burn books. I managed to finish this one, however, mainly because in its graphic novel adaptation there are not too many words to read. Still, however, it does not mean I had already been completely charme I tried reading the original of this novel sometime ago but I stopped. I believe I stopped at that point, not too far from the beginning, where two characters, conversing, made it like a forgotten myth that firemen used to put out fires, not like what they are now: police-like professionals who burn books. I managed to finish this one, however, mainly because in its graphic novel adaptation there are not too many words to read. Still, however, it does not mean I had already been completely charmed by the story. Its premise is that there will come a time when all books--even the well-loved classics--will be considered subversive materials and the cause of mankind's sufferings, and that to preserve them, people have to memorize these books. I just don't dig that kind of plot. It is too much of a fiction for a fiction for me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    It’s always thrilling to reread a favorite book, in this case, a graphic novel based on the novel, with the author’s consent. Instead of quoting the many famous quotes from Fahrenheit 451, I’m going to quote the introduction by Ray Bradbury. “…Anyone reading this introduction should take the time to name the one book that he or she would most want to memorize and protect from any censors or ‘firemen.’ And not only name the book but give the reasons why they would wish to memorize it and why it w It’s always thrilling to reread a favorite book, in this case, a graphic novel based on the novel, with the author’s consent. Instead of quoting the many famous quotes from Fahrenheit 451, I’m going to quote the introduction by Ray Bradbury. “…Anyone reading this introduction should take the time to name the one book that he or she would most want to memorize and protect from any censors or ‘firemen.’ And not only name the book but give the reasons why they would wish to memorize it and why it would be a valuable asset to be recited and remembered in the future.” My book this morning would be Fahrenheit 451. Why, because ideas that stray from the mainstream or that the mainstream does not approve of are always under attack and at risk of censorship.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna Keating

    Beatty: "Blacks don't like Little Black Sambo. Burn it. White people hate Uncle Tom's Cabin. Burn it. The Jews? Hate Fagin in Oliver Twist. Burn Fagin. The Irish? Think Sean O'Casey is out to get them. Burn O'Casey. The Russians? Hate the Wall Street Journal. Where's my match? The Republicans? Detest the Communist Manifesto. Light the fire. Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice? Women's Lib hates that. Old-fashioned female, old-fashioned ways. Into the furnace. Proust's Remembrance of Things Past. T Beatty: "Blacks don't like Little Black Sambo. Burn it. White people hate Uncle Tom's Cabin. Burn it. The Jews? Hate Fagin in Oliver Twist. Burn Fagin. The Irish? Think Sean O'Casey is out to get them. Burn O'Casey. The Russians? Hate the Wall Street Journal. Where's my match? The Republicans? Detest the Communist Manifesto. Light the fire. Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice? Women's Lib hates that. Old-fashioned female, old-fashioned ways. Into the furnace. Proust's Remembrance of Things Past. Too much homosexuality. Burn. Death in Venice, Thomas Mann. Not Enough! More comic books, more sex, more non-books, more gossip, eh? Plenty of facts but no meaning. . . . Give the people more contests they win by remembering the words of popular songs or state capitals or how much corn Iowa grew last year. Cram them full of non-combustible facts, chock them so full of data they feel stuffed, feel absolutely brilliant with information. Then they'll feel they are thinking; they'll get a sense of motion without moving. And they'll be happy, because facts of that sort don't change, they just sit there, eh? To hell with philosophy, that's depressing! Bring on the acrobats, magicians, daredevils, jet cars, motorcycles, sex and heroin. On your feet, Mrs. Montag."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I don't read graphic novels as a rule. I am a comic book fan from way back, but I find it difficult to 'read' most graphic novels. For me it generally takes several pages to get into a rhythm, to begin to read the illustrations AND the text as one. In some cases I never do reach that point. This graphic adaptation of Fahrenheit 451 is an astonishing exception. From the first panel I was caught up and swept into the story. I thought rhe illustrations spoke as clearly and powerfully as Ray Bradbur I don't read graphic novels as a rule. I am a comic book fan from way back, but I find it difficult to 'read' most graphic novels. For me it generally takes several pages to get into a rhythm, to begin to read the illustrations AND the text as one. In some cases I never do reach that point. This graphic adaptation of Fahrenheit 451 is an astonishing exception. From the first panel I was caught up and swept into the story. I thought rhe illustrations spoke as clearly and powerfully as Ray Bradbury's text. And even though the original text is significantly pared down, it hasn't lost any of its power.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    The book includes an introduction by Ray Bradbury, which gave it an excellent gravitas as you then moved into the illustrated story. This adaption was solid, and knowing that it was approved by Bradbury helped me feel that it represented what the author was trying to convey in his initial novel.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lars Guthrie

    What a fantastic interpretation, proven by the fact that this comic book version really does make me want to revisit the source. Hamilton's design, color and drawing style perfectly complement Bradbury's words. And Bradbury's words, from 1953, were so prescient. Here are some current observations from 'The Brain That Changes Itself,' Norman Doidge's book from 2007: 'Television, music videos, and video games...unfold...faster...than real life, and they are getting faster, which causes people to de What a fantastic interpretation, proven by the fact that this comic book version really does make me want to revisit the source. Hamilton's design, color and drawing style perfectly complement Bradbury's words. And Bradbury's words, from 1953, were so prescient. Here are some current observations from 'The Brain That Changes Itself,' Norman Doidge's book from 2007: 'Television, music videos, and video games...unfold...faster...than real life, and they are getting faster, which causes people to develop an increased appetite for high-speed transitions.... It is the form of the...medium--cuts, edits, zooms, pans, and sudden noises--that alters the brain, by activating what Pavlov called the "orienting response...." The orientation response evolved...because our forbears...needed to react to situations that could be dangerous or could provide sudden opportunities.... Television triggers this response at a far more rapid rate than we experience in life, which is why we can’t keep our eyes off the TV screen...and why people watch TV a lot longer than they intend. Because typical music videos, action sequences, and commercials trigger orienting responses at a rate of one per second, watching them puts us into a continuous orienting response with no recovery. No wonder people report feeling drained from watching TV. Yet we acquire a taste for it and find slower changes boring. The cost is that such activities as reading, complex conversation, and listening to lectures become more difficult.' Bradbury, a half century earlier, has Professor Faber advise Montag, an official book burner: 'If you're not driving a hundred miles an hour, at a clip where you can't think of anything else but the danger, then you're playing some game or sitting in some room where you can't argue with the four-wall televisor. The televisor is "real." It is immediate, it has dimension. It tells you what to think and blasts it in. It rushes you on so quickly to its own conclusions your mind hasn't time to process, "What nonsense!"' When Montag comments that his wife says 'books aren't "real," Faber answers, 'Thank God for that. You can shut them, say, "Hold on a moment."' Here's a way to introduce such ideas to readers who may find reading and complex conversation more difficult in the midst of too much screen time. The book's real hero is the teenaged Clarisse, a martyr for thoughtfully and reflectively processing the novel's dystopian world. Highly recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Hamilton’s graphic novel is a faithful condensation of Bradbury’s 1950 novel about censorship and enforced conformity. In addition to excellent and effective illustration, some deliberate irony is included. At the bottom of page 47 an illustration includes copies of Hamlet for Dimwits, Time magazine and Classic Comics versions of Moby Dick and Treasure Island. to accompany this text from Bradbury, “…in the twentieth century speed up your camera. Condensations. Digests. Everything boils down to a Hamilton’s graphic novel is a faithful condensation of Bradbury’s 1950 novel about censorship and enforced conformity. In addition to excellent and effective illustration, some deliberate irony is included. At the bottom of page 47 an illustration includes copies of Hamlet for Dimwits, Time magazine and Classic Comics versions of Moby Dick and Treasure Island. to accompany this text from Bradbury, “…in the twentieth century speed up your camera. Condensations. Digests. Everything boils down to a snap ending. Classics cut to fill a two-minute book column.” The irony is that Hamilton also adapted Treasure Island into a graphic novel for Puffin in 2005. The Bradbury monologue is part of the Fire Chief’s explanation of how society itself has dumbed-down, and as book burners, firemen are only doing the will of the people. And as he continues on the next few pages, “More cartoons in books. More pictures … let the comic books survive. … It didn’t come from the Government down. There was no dictum, no declaration, no censorship to start with, no! Technology, mass exploitation, and minority pressure carried the trick, thank God. Today, thanks to them you can stay happy all the time.”

  23. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    It is hard to believe that this is my first reading of is novel. It is uncanny how apropos it is to our times, having been written well before the internet, social media, and virtual reality. The last third of the story took an unexpectedly optimistic philosophical turn, which I felt added significantly to the work, especially in the current context of in vogue dystopian novels with relentlessly bleak and nihilistic themes. One of my favorite passages: “Everyone must leave something behind when he It is hard to believe that this is my first reading of is novel. It is uncanny how apropos it is to our times, having been written well before the internet, social media, and virtual reality. The last third of the story took an unexpectedly optimistic philosophical turn, which I felt added significantly to the work, especially in the current context of in vogue dystopian novels with relentlessly bleak and nihilistic themes. One of my favorite passages: “Everyone must leave something behind when he dies, my grandfather said. A child or a book or a painting or a house or a wall built or a pair of shoes made. Or a garden planted. Something your hand touched some way so your soul has somewhere to go when you die, and when people look at that tree or that flower you planted, you’re there. It doesn’t matter what you do, he said, so long as you change something from the way it was before you touched it into something that’s like you after you take your hands away. The difference between the man who just cuts lawns and a real gardener is in the touching, he said. The lawn-cutter might just as well not have been there at all; the gardener will be there a lifetime.”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    Overall, I enjoyed the graphic novel even though I felt it was a bit confusing to follow the story. I think the fact that I read the original novel before hand made the graphic novel easier to follow and understand. The novel is basically about a fireman who is suppose to burn books, but turns out to steal books and read them even though he is not allowed to. The graphic novel does a great job with showing what is happening throughout the story with the vibrent colors and detail used.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Rokaw

    An English teacher and I never read Fahrenheit 451. What a shame, and one I've officially rectified. This novel was beautifully done, entirely in cool blues and fiery oranges befit of the topic. What happens when the world gets so focused on happiness, on pleasure and joy and this very moment, that we forget what it means to think? A classic retold in a modern, approachable way, this graphic novel adaptation of Fahrenheit 451 has me aching to read another book, and another, until I am a library a An English teacher and I never read Fahrenheit 451. What a shame, and one I've officially rectified. This novel was beautifully done, entirely in cool blues and fiery oranges befit of the topic. What happens when the world gets so focused on happiness, on pleasure and joy and this very moment, that we forget what it means to think? A classic retold in a modern, approachable way, this graphic novel adaptation of Fahrenheit 451 has me aching to read another book, and another, until I am a library all my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Fahrenheit 451, written by Ray Bradbury in 1953 during the height of the Cold War, cannot be fully understood outside of its historical context. America was clouded by an atmosphere of paranoia, suspicion, and the fearful sense of a world rushing toward a nuclear holocaust. It was the heyday of "McCarthyism," named after Senator Joe McCarthy, who went on a crusade to root out alleged Communists and homosexuals both inside and outside government. His witch-hunts destroyed a great many careers, an Fahrenheit 451, written by Ray Bradbury in 1953 during the height of the Cold War, cannot be fully understood outside of its historical context. America was clouded by an atmosphere of paranoia, suspicion, and the fearful sense of a world rushing toward a nuclear holocaust. It was the heyday of "McCarthyism," named after Senator Joe McCarthy, who went on a crusade to root out alleged Communists and homosexuals both inside and outside government. His witch-hunts destroyed a great many careers, and even resulted in suicides by some of his victims. As PBS reports: "... the paranoid hunt for infiltrators was notoriously difficult on writers and entertainers, many of whom were labeled communist sympathizers and were unable to continue working. Some had their passports taken away, while others were jailed for refusing to give the names of other communists. The trials, which were well publicized, could often destroy a career with a single unsubstantiated accusation. Among those well-known artists accused of communist sympathies or called before the committee were Dashiell Hammett, Waldo Salt, Lillian Hellman, Lena Horne, Paul Robeson, Elia Kazan, Arthur Miller, Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, Charlie Chaplin and Group Theatre members Clifford Odets, Elia Kazan, and Stella Adler. In all, three hundred and twenty artists were blacklisted, and for many of them this meant the end of exceptional and promising careers." "Fahrenheit 451," Bradbury tells us at the start of his original novel, is the temperature at which book paper catches fire and burns. In his imagined future dystopia, Guy Montag is a “fireman” who starts fires rather than stopping them. The firemen respond to calls of those who accuse someone of harboring books: they burn the books along with the house, and the owners are arrested (unless they choose to commit suicide). Books are forbidden because they can allow people to think, to be unhappy, to question the government, and to question war. Montag, married to a drugged-up, tuned-out wife he can’t even remember how he met, believes he is happy, until he encounters his new neighbor Clarisse. A seventeen-year-old girl, she has been identified as “crazy” and “dangerous” because she is not enslaved to the media and its hypnotic messages; she takes walks, examines her surroundings and the people in it, talks with her family and others about matters of substance, and most importantly, is not afraid to ask questions. The honesty and openness of Clarisse unhinges Montag, and he soon becomes one of those who hides from the fires, rather than one of those who sets them. This graphic retelling, approved by Bradbury, is a shorter version of the original, and in a way, does a lot of the “thinking” for you, since it provides visual images to replace ideas, and dialogue to sit in for narration. The truncated speeches by characters fit with the format as well as the (sometimes, at least) shorter attention span of readers. Tim Hamilton does a good job with the illustrations, using a muted color palette to provide a bleak dystopian feel, with periodic leaps to the bright yellow, red, and orange of the fire scenes. Thankfully, the people he draws are not as unattractive as are so many graphic novel protagonists (for reasons unknown to me). Discussion: Many classics are now being issued as graphic novels. I tend to have an “old-fashioned” outlook, preferring books. But I know that all the young people in my family, at least, tend to reject anything that doesn’t have a lot of visual content and a video-game type appeal. So a graphic version is therefore, to my mind, preferable to no version at all. Furthermore, in this case I am entertained by the fact that a graphic novel version of Fahrenheit 451 is in the postmodern sense a meta-commentary on the fate of books, taking the plot of the original one step further. Evaluation: Tim Hamilton does an excellent job on this graphic version of the book, if you prefer this particular format.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    What would you do if you were told it was illegal to read, or to even own a book? How long do you think civilization would remember that they used to enjoy reading? Would you break the law, even at the risk of being arrested? Having your books torched? Your house burned to the ground? Who? Montag: A fireman. (In this story, firemen are in charge of finding those who are hiding books then burning both the books and the homes.) Millie: Montag's wife. Clarisse: A young girl who changes the way Montag l What would you do if you were told it was illegal to read, or to even own a book? How long do you think civilization would remember that they used to enjoy reading? Would you break the law, even at the risk of being arrested? Having your books torched? Your house burned to the ground? Who? Montag: A fireman. (In this story, firemen are in charge of finding those who are hiding books then burning both the books and the homes.) Millie: Montag's wife. Clarisse: A young girl who changes the way Montag looks at life in a few short conversations. Captain Beatty: The fire chief. Faber: An old man who has been hiding books. What? After a routine burning goes wrong when a woman refuses to leave the house, going up in flames with her home and her books, Montag begins to wonder what is in books that would make a person do that. He has taken books from fires before, but has never opened one to read it. After the incident with the woman, he reads from a book to his wife and her friends, who then turn him in. During the burning of his house, he manages to escape arrest with the help of Faber, who then tells him where he can hide out. Will Montag manage to beat the Firemen, or is reading lost forever? Where? An American city. When? The future. Why? Captain Beatty believes that firemen are responsible for keeping people happy, and books make people unhappy. Faber remembers when firemen put out fires instead of starting them, and would like to preserve something of that time. Millie is a lemming, happy to do whatever she is told by the parties in charge. Montag realizes he is unhappy, after Clarisse asks him whether or not he is happy. Realizing that he is still unhappy without the presence of books, Montag decides to give books a try and finds that there may be some real reasons to save them. Favorite Parts: Clarisse has always been my favorite character, the way she acts as as the catalyst to all the action in the book, and the way that her one comment completely changed the direction of Montag's life. Reading the graphic novel version gives a different feel and vision to the story. The pictures are bleak and dreary, and it really does bring the story to life. I felt the adaptation was true to the original story, though it has been quite a few years since I read it. A few of my favorite quotes from the book: "It's not books you need, it's some of the things that once were in books." -Faber (p. 73) "Remember, the firemen are rarely necessary. The public itself stopped reading of its own accord." -Faber (p. 78) "Oh God, the terrible tyranny of the majority." -Faber (p. 100) "Someday the load we're carrying with us may help someone. But even when we had the books on hand, we didn't use what we got out of them." (p. 148) Least Favorite Parts: I can't think of anything I don't love about this story, unless it is Millie. She is completely spineless and selfish. I know that is the way she needs to be for the story, but she does annoy me. Recommend? Yes To whom? Readers of dystopian fiction, teens who are reluctant to read some of the classics, pretty much anyone, really. READ MORE REVIEWS AT http://sschpagepals.blogspot.com

  28. 5 out of 5

    Corinne Edwards

    When I first read Fahrenheit 451 as a teen, I was already an avid book lover, so it frightened me then, with the palpable hate of the written word. This time, though, reading it as an adult in 2010, what frightened me more was how close our society has come to Montag's - the walls covered with tv? People interacting more with that tv and about that tv and it's programs than with actual people? THAT freaks me out on a completely different level. It's a brilliant story - a world cut of the exact sa When I first read Fahrenheit 451 as a teen, I was already an avid book lover, so it frightened me then, with the palpable hate of the written word. This time, though, reading it as an adult in 2010, what frightened me more was how close our society has come to Montag's - the walls covered with tv? People interacting more with that tv and about that tv and it's programs than with actual people? THAT freaks me out on a completely different level. It's a brilliant story - a world cut of the exact same cloth as our own, astonishing really, how close to right Bradbury got it. The masses have rejected books and reading, it's easier to not really think and just have fun - to watch the parlor walls and live a life insulated from any sort of bad news or philosophies that might tempt you to want to make an effort. It doesn't help that life is so fast paced, either - books take too much time and energy. Not only that, but there are so many ways to offend and be offended, that if you just stop reading - everyone is happier, right? OH how it makes you think. I want to shake myself up from the inside out, remind myself of how lucky I am to have a world full of ideas and authentic feelings at my fingertips. The drawing are pretty sci-fi, they felt like the 50s and the burning scenes are intense. The adaptation did a fine job of giving you the plot with some actual quotes from the book as part of the text. This quote absolutely floors me: "It’s not books you need, it’s some of the things that once were in books. The same things could be in the “parlour families” today. The same infinite detail and awareness could be projected through the radios and televisors, but are not. No, no, it’s not books at all you’re looking for! Take it where you can find it, in old phonograph records, old motion pictures, and in old friends; look for it in nature and look for it in yourself. Books were only one type of receptacle where we stored a lot of things we were afraid we might forget. There is nothing magical in them at all. The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us." (the part in italics is not actually in the text of the graphic novel, but it's too good not to include :) I love the idea of books stitching the patches of the universe together for me. If you have no inclination to actually read the whole of Fahrenheit 451, I would pick this up for sure. If you are a true lover of books, you need to know this story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    "Fahrenheit 451: The Authorized Adaptation" is a graphic novel adaptation of Ray Bradbury's original story "Fahrenheit 451". This cautionary tale is set in a futuristic time period where books are thought of as corrupt devices. The people in this story believe that books cause people to become more intelligent than others, and could gain more power as a result. To control this unwanted aspect, the government has issued 'firemen' to burn books. Burning books is viewed as a positive contribution t "Fahrenheit 451: The Authorized Adaptation" is a graphic novel adaptation of Ray Bradbury's original story "Fahrenheit 451". This cautionary tale is set in a futuristic time period where books are thought of as corrupt devices. The people in this story believe that books cause people to become more intelligent than others, and could gain more power as a result. To control this unwanted aspect, the government has issued 'firemen' to burn books. Burning books is viewed as a positive contribution to society. "Fahrenheit 451" follows the journey of a fireman named Guy Montag as he begins to question whether burning books is the right thing to do. I thoroughly enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation. I have read Ray Bradbury's original novel of "Fahrenheit 451", so I already knew the story while reading. I liked how this adaptation utilized the same text from the original story. I found that reading this adaptation added a new element of emotion through images and color. I liked how the story was told in mostly muted color, to show the darkness and oppression of society on the public. I also admired the use of vivid, violent, and dramatic color schemes for the book burnings. The images are also drawn in an 'edgy' style that is almost like a sketch. This could symbolize the chaos of the time and the effect is has on it's citizens. I like how this book showed the extremes of characters and how they think in this society. First, you have the firemen who think burning books is a good thing. Fireman Beatty states "We're going to keep the world happy, Montag!" as they go off to burn books. Second, you have Montag who begins to doubt book burnings. Montag reflects on the firemen, "I suddenly realized I didn't like them at all, and I didn't like myself at all anymore". Then you have characters who are content living in this world, like Mille, and characters that don't like this world, like Clarisse. I would highly recommend this adaptation to anyone who has read the original "Fahrenheit 451". I think you will find this graphic novel captures that characters well. I would also recommend this to anyone who admires political satire. This book's political statement is very global.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Irene McHugh

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. An authorized adaptation of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451? Really? He harshly criticized compressing classic content into comic books. Just another example of the dumbing down of society! So an authorized graphic novel? Let me see that! Now! This graphic novel still criticizes classics as comics. Loved that! Yet, it also preserves the majority of the plot, themes and symbols from the original novel. Some of the descriptive prose of the original is merely replaced with fantastic images. The use of An authorized adaptation of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451? Really? He harshly criticized compressing classic content into comic books. Just another example of the dumbing down of society! So an authorized graphic novel? Let me see that! Now! This graphic novel still criticizes classics as comics. Loved that! Yet, it also preserves the majority of the plot, themes and symbols from the original novel. Some of the descriptive prose of the original is merely replaced with fantastic images. The use of specific colors, hues and shades further enhance Bradbury's message. One of the first images that disturbed me was Mildred having her stomach pumped at home. At first the colors are yellowish, but with tinges of a blue-green kind of sickness. I actually stared at a few images and felt sick myself. Several of the images of burning also stand out. When Montag and the fire crew burn the woman who's been hoarding books, the woman who chooses to stay with her stash, the colors of the fire are also initially yellowish. The faces of all of the firefighters are dark and lined. However, my favorite pages begin with Montag at the river. Many shades of blue with white lettering. Then we meet the underground library. These men are sitting around a fire. A fire that is different than any other Montag has known. The yellow is softer. There are still shades of blue, still white lettering. I'm really impressed with how well Tim Hamilton visually captured so much of Bradbury's prose.

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