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WHO ARE THE DARK X-MEN? He has his own Avengers team and now Norman Osborn has his own X-Men team. The other shoe has finally dropped and Emma Frost has betrayed Cyclops and the rest of the X-Men. And that's just one of the huge surprises in "UTOPIA." Is that Namor? Cloak and Dagger? Professor X?! The thing that you aren't ready for is that Osborn is right. Collecting: Dar WHO ARE THE DARK X-MEN? He has his own Avengers team and now Norman Osborn has his own X-Men team. The other shoe has finally dropped and Emma Frost has betrayed Cyclops and the rest of the X-Men. And that's just one of the huge surprises in "UTOPIA." Is that Namor? Cloak and Dagger? Professor X?! The thing that you aren't ready for is that Osborn is right. Collecting: Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men: Utopia & Exodus, Uncanny X-Men 513-514, Dark Avengers 7-8, Dark X-Men: The Beginning 1-3, X-Men Legacy 226-227, Dark X-Men: The Confession, & material from Dark Reign: The Cabal


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WHO ARE THE DARK X-MEN? He has his own Avengers team and now Norman Osborn has his own X-Men team. The other shoe has finally dropped and Emma Frost has betrayed Cyclops and the rest of the X-Men. And that's just one of the huge surprises in "UTOPIA." Is that Namor? Cloak and Dagger? Professor X?! The thing that you aren't ready for is that Osborn is right. Collecting: Dar WHO ARE THE DARK X-MEN? He has his own Avengers team and now Norman Osborn has his own X-Men team. The other shoe has finally dropped and Emma Frost has betrayed Cyclops and the rest of the X-Men. And that's just one of the huge surprises in "UTOPIA." Is that Namor? Cloak and Dagger? Professor X?! The thing that you aren't ready for is that Osborn is right. Collecting: Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men: Utopia & Exodus, Uncanny X-Men 513-514, Dark Avengers 7-8, Dark X-Men: The Beginning 1-3, X-Men Legacy 226-227, Dark X-Men: The Confession, & material from Dark Reign: The Cabal

30 review for Avengers/Uncanny X-Men: Utopia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Hi. My name is Jeff and I’m a Marvel crossover completist. Hi, Jeff, and welcome! Woman in the back wearing Green Lantern t-shirt - “Completist” isn’t a real word!” I have a problem. I feel compelled to read every volume - even the worst ones – the ones written and illustrated by Marvel’s C-teams. I have some OCD tendencies, this is true. Still, I see a Dark Reign tie-in issue and I have to read it – Dark Reign – Marvel Zombies vs. Marvel Apes; Dark Reign – Foggy Nelson, Attorney at Law; Dark Re Hi. My name is Jeff and I’m a Marvel crossover completist. Hi, Jeff, and welcome! Woman in the back wearing Green Lantern t-shirt - “Completist” isn’t a real word!” I have a problem. I feel compelled to read every volume - even the worst ones – the ones written and illustrated by Marvel’s C-teams. I have some OCD tendencies, this is true. Still, I see a Dark Reign tie-in issue and I have to read it – Dark Reign – Marvel Zombies vs. Marvel Apes; Dark Reign – Foggy Nelson, Attorney at Law; Dark Reign – Howard the Duck, I’m there. Okay, maybe not the last one…*sob* I need help. The only solace I can take is that I don’t feel a need to read complete DC crossovers. That would be messed up, like doing crack off the belly of a seventy year old stripper. We’re here for you, Je… Are those cream donuts on the back table? It’s the X-Men’s turn at having Norman Osborn and HAMMER take a run at them. At this point, the X-Men are hanging out in San Francisco, lending a helping hand and everything is sort of honky-dory until trouble maker, William Stryker shows up. As with all of these types of antagonistic engagements, peaceful coexistence and cooler heads don’t prevail. Jeepers, where’s the fun it that? *sigh* (Take that, faux Captain Sugah Marvel…) Osborn uses the conflict as a way of sending in his god-damned dirty Avengers in an attempt to put his fascist Iron Patriot boot heel on the X-Men. In the crossover event as a whole, Osborn is always one PR brainstorm/boondoggle ahead/behind anyone else. He recruits a Dark X-Men team to go toe-to-toe with the real X-Men, led by Scott Summers, Cyclops. Cyclops is still a reasonable guy with a plan at this point in continuity, but a few more bricks to the head and all bets are off. Cyclops plan involves keeping it pretty close to the vest and consequently lying to the other X-Men. Recruiting Dark X-Men isn’t easy, but Osborn uses a number of different techniques. Yay, it’s the Dark Crazy Beast! Oh, Emma, just say no… And sometimes it just doesn’t work out, as evidenced by his encounter with Aurora, woman of a thousand personalities. Wolverine Jr. is on both Dark teams, so he’s a bit more cranky than usual. The X-Men use the resulting conflict… …to pull away from humanity even more. Bottom Line: This one isn’t as bad as the separate Dark X-Men tie-in – that one was awful – it’s just bloated and at times confusing as hell. The storylines aren’t integrated very well and, even though it’s entertaining at times, it still falls short of being “pretty good.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Great profane Cthulhu but this was a mess! The plot jumps all over the place, story elements are set up then completely forgotten about, characters disappear for huge swathes of time with no explanation, characters receive seemingly grievous wounds and then are up and about with not a mark on them a few pages later... Seriously, I cannot recommend this to anybody; the only reason I've given it two stars is because some of the artwork is really nice (and some of it most definitely isn't). If anyon Great profane Cthulhu but this was a mess! The plot jumps all over the place, story elements are set up then completely forgotten about, characters disappear for huge swathes of time with no explanation, characters receive seemingly grievous wounds and then are up and about with not a mark on them a few pages later... Seriously, I cannot recommend this to anybody; the only reason I've given it two stars is because some of the artwork is really nice (and some of it most definitely isn't). If anyone needs evidence for why comicbook companies shouldn't do multi-title crossovers, I give you Exhibit A...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    This was a well drawn crossover between two of Marvel’s biggest properties, the Avengers and the X-Men. As is wont between two super teams, the groups engaged in some unadulterated mayhem. Overall, the story was rather forgettable but the ramifications of the final chapter of this story extended beyond this six-part storyline. The X-Men now have their own island distinct from the United States. No longer were they beholden to the United States whose top law enforcer was a schizophrenic super-vil This was a well drawn crossover between two of Marvel’s biggest properties, the Avengers and the X-Men. As is wont between two super teams, the groups engaged in some unadulterated mayhem. Overall, the story was rather forgettable but the ramifications of the final chapter of this story extended beyond this six-part storyline. The X-Men now have their own island distinct from the United States. No longer were they beholden to the United States whose top law enforcer was a schizophrenic super-villain. The mutants, whose numbers have dwindled since the Scarlet Witch uttered a sentence fragment that decimated a thriving species became unto themselves like a North Korea. Namor, a mutant because of his hybrid human/Atlantean physiology joined the X-Men officially. His status as a sovereign lends legitimacy to this fledging state. This new mutant status quo sets up for future stories. As the world’s remaining mutants coalesced in Utopia, it gave them strength and yet made them a convenient target for their enemies. A similar incident already happened, when millions of mutant souls died when Genosha, the former mutant homeland, was attacked by a colossal Tri-Sentinel. As I said, this story was rather forgettable. Both sides were able to spin a victory from their internecine warfare. The X-Men get their island, and Osborn was able to solve America’s mutant problem. A potential hostile state only a few kilometers off its west coast notwithstanding, Osborn claimed it as a moral and personal victory for his ego to feed on. Nevertheless, never underestimate the power of broadcast media that can turn a psychopath into a respected national figure.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Kinda all over the place...but enough good. Fraction pulled it off, barely. The dark X-men are stupid, and using Daken as wolverine in both is a fun joke, but not over the whole number of books. What I like the most is that it explained how Emma and Namor were able to extract themselves from the Cabal. It also shows Emma and Scott having a better relationship than I thought, and Normie getting fucked. Also some X force action, and showing how Utopia became the home of the xmen and how Namor joined t Kinda all over the place...but enough good. Fraction pulled it off, barely. The dark X-men are stupid, and using Daken as wolverine in both is a fun joke, but not over the whole number of books. What I like the most is that it explained how Emma and Namor were able to extract themselves from the Cabal. It also shows Emma and Scott having a better relationship than I thought, and Normie getting fucked. Also some X force action, and showing how Utopia became the home of the xmen and how Namor joined the ranks. There's lots of dumb shit, but I'm focusing on the cool forest, not the weird trees....does that even make sense? I hope so.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    As Amazon reviews will helpfully tell you, the issues in this book were printed out of order. Not like someone made a mistake -- it's just that the main Utopia storyline, playing out as it does across many different X-titles, doesn't really make a lot of sense without a lot of the peripheral world-building, character-backstorying stuff originally published across a bunch of other X-titles around the same time. Sure, you can read Utopia 1-6 and you'll see the heroes win and the bad guys get punch As Amazon reviews will helpfully tell you, the issues in this book were printed out of order. Not like someone made a mistake -- it's just that the main Utopia storyline, playing out as it does across many different X-titles, doesn't really make a lot of sense without a lot of the peripheral world-building, character-backstorying stuff originally published across a bunch of other X-titles around the same time. Sure, you can read Utopia 1-6 and you'll see the heroes win and the bad guys get punched in the face. But if you want to know why/how certain characters got mixed into the fray, you need the ephemera. Such is the nature of nerdy superhero crossovers. Luckily, all the material is collected here -- main storyline and peripheral stuff -- but it's split into these two parts (main/peripheral) even though the events of both weave in and out of each other concurrently. So it's a disorienting read if taken cover-to-cover -- and while I could just use the internets as a guide to lock down a better reading order, call me lazy but I just don't know how bad I want to think about the order in which I read the issues contained in my X-Men paperbacks. But the main story is pretty cool -- good art, dramatic set pieces, interesting character bits, a nice plot twist. All those lovely reading-y things. And then you hit the second half of the book, and you have to actually start thinking about how everything fits together, and good christ if I wanted to think and read X-Men comics at the same time I'd go reread Grant Morrison or whatever.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Re-reading this next to Carey's X-Men Legacy, and I gotta say hands-down, Fraction is the better X-Men writer. I don't care how much emotional weight Carey's childhood full of X-Men carries, he just flat-out writes some if the flattest, most tinny X-men dialogue I've read this last couple of years. (I shouldn't be too hard on him tho - he's not half as tone-deaf to decent dialogue as Dan Slott's been in his Avengers run - yeesh.) Deodato's art at the end is fan-f'ing-tastic, and it really stands Re-reading this next to Carey's X-Men Legacy, and I gotta say hands-down, Fraction is the better X-Men writer. I don't care how much emotional weight Carey's childhood full of X-Men carries, he just flat-out writes some if the flattest, most tinny X-men dialogue I've read this last couple of years. (I shouldn't be too hard on him tho - he's not half as tone-deaf to decent dialogue as Dan Slott's been in his Avengers run - yeesh.) Deodato's art at the end is fan-f'ing-tastic, and it really stands out upon a re-read. After seeing Bendis and Deodato tear up the scenery for a few months it got so I just expected all art to be this good. But give it a while, see what everyone else is doing in the meantime, and then WHAM does Mike's quality hit home.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This was okayish. I like the idea. The mutants are getting the shit end of the deal by Norman's new Dark Reign deal. Cyclops decides to push a new plan that'll change everything. However, he needs to have all the players in place. This won't be so easy but Emma forms the Dark X-Men, while Wolverine takes his X-Force to new places, to all come to a big reveal and conclusion. The thing is the main Utopia story is pretty solid. It's interesting with good twist and solid art. It would rank around a This was okayish. I like the idea. The mutants are getting the shit end of the deal by Norman's new Dark Reign deal. Cyclops decides to push a new plan that'll change everything. However, he needs to have all the players in place. This won't be so easy but Emma forms the Dark X-Men, while Wolverine takes his X-Force to new places, to all come to a big reveal and conclusion. The thing is the main Utopia story is pretty solid. It's interesting with good twist and solid art. It would rank around a 3 out of 5. However, this overstuffed collection has a few side stories after Utopia but they feel so out of place AFTER reading the main event you can't help but question why they are in here. So it's around a 2.5 out of 5 for the collection.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I'm a huge fan of the X-Men, but I'm most familiar with the All-New, All-Different X-Men Chris Claremont debuted in 1975. I pretty much have everything about that X-team from its inception to its disintegration and re-forming as two separate teams. Then the 1990s happened, and, having sampled a few issues from that time period, I decided I can safely skip that whole chapter in X-history. I caught back up with the X-Men in college, when Chris Claremont came back for "X-Men: The New Age," which I I'm a huge fan of the X-Men, but I'm most familiar with the All-New, All-Different X-Men Chris Claremont debuted in 1975. I pretty much have everything about that X-team from its inception to its disintegration and re-forming as two separate teams. Then the 1990s happened, and, having sampled a few issues from that time period, I decided I can safely skip that whole chapter in X-history. I caught back up with the X-Men in college, when Chris Claremont came back for "X-Men: The New Age," which I followed until the House of M realitysplosion. Add in Joss Whedon's run on "Astonishing X-Men" and Grant Morrison's run on "New X-Men", and you have the entirety of my Marvel Universe background. I picked up "Utopia" because I'd heard about an upcoming event called "Schism," where Cyclops and Wolverine part ways, each taking half of the current crop of X-Men with him, and I wanted to get some idea of what's been happening in the Marvel Universe leading up to that. Overall, I say "meh" to it. This is unfortunate, because "Utopia" didn't have to be a "meh" book at all! It starts out on fairly solid and fertile ground for an X-Men story: the human-mutant conflict, this time erupting over a discriminatory law called "Proposition X" which would restrict mutants' rights to have children. Henry McCoy and a bunch of younger mutants are in San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district, protesting, and they clash violently with mostly human, anti-mutant counterprotestors, led by (of course) a member of the indefatigable Trask family. So, that's all very interesting, but we only get maybe five pages of that and then the story changes focus completely, turning to Norman Osborn (a.k.a., the industrialist/mad scientist/supercriminal the Green Goblin, from "Spider-Man") who is apparently passing for a good guy now? And leading a team of Avengers and, now, X-Men too? Anyway, he ends up sending both of these teams into San Francisco to restore order, which is difficult since both teams include such intrinsically disorderly types as Venom, Bullseye, Mimic, Daken and Ares. (Yes, apparently they *really* mean Ares, the Greek god of war, not just some superpowered guy with a toothbrush helmet and anger issues ... I knew the Norse gods sometimes showed up in Marvel comics, but hadn't seen any Greek ones before!) Anyway, with these new "peacekeepers" on the scene, things explode into three- or four-way mayhem, with agitated mutant protestors and the X-Men on one side, human anti-mutant activists egged on to violence by Whatsisname Trask III or IV, and Norman Osborn's two teams fighting both of those factions, and sometimes each other. There's also a fair amount of subterfuge, as Norman Osborn has made Emma Frost the leader of his "Dark X-Men," and wherever Emma Frost goes, she brings along enough ulterior motives to fill a walk-in closet. What most contributed to my not finding this story all that compelling were 1) too many characters and 2) too much chaos. What's more, the "too many characters" were drawn from all over the Marvel Universe, so for me at least half of the dramatis personae here were total strangers. And since, with the exception of major players like Cyclops, Emma Frost or Norman Osborn, each one might get a few lines of significant dialogue and a few combat appearances, you're not going to know those characters any better after you've read this book than before. You are also probably not going to get attached to anyone you didn't already know, and you might well be disappointed in the author's handling of those characters you do know. Two examples stick out for me: Mystique and Daken. Mystique is on Norman Osborn's X-Men (why? She's a mutant separatist, and not above violent, pre-emptive action against human she deems a threat; her sympathies ought to lie with the mutant protestors), but all she does is sit around pretending to be Professor X and issuing public statements of support for Osborn's activities. Mystique is a fascinating, subtle character; intelligent, devious, fiercely protective of those few people she cares about and a consummate spy, a decent tactician and a badass hand-to-hand combatant. Here she's reduced to a play-acting henchwoman. And Daken ... he, too, seemed underused and reduced in this story. I've only seen him before in Daniel Way's "Wolverine: Origins Vol. 5", but there he seemed to have ten times the personality he has here. What I liked about Daken as written by Daniel Way was his urbanity, and his contemptuous sense of humor. He still has the berserker rage going on underneath that, though, so he has this weird periodicity between opera-going sophisticate whose weapon of choice is his wit, and the howling savage who uses his teeth and claws. Also, he's bisexual and has the power to manipulate the emotions of people around him. Given all that, it's a shame his only role in "Utopia" is ultraviolent thug. He only even gets one halfway decent one-liner: when Bullseye confronts him about belonging to the Dark X-Men and the Dark Avengers, he tosses something off about "I always did like playing for both teams." Zing! That's all the fun I got out of having him in this book, though; all the rest of the book, he scowls, growls, threatens and menaces like some insecure newbie's interpretation of Wolverine. "I don't know what to do with this guy; better have him go fight something!" It's probably impossible to discuss this in depth without spoiling everything, so I'll just leave it at saying that Scott's and Emma's actions baffled me. Maybe I'd have benefited from keeping up with them after Joss Whedon left "Astonishing X-Men," and maybe not. It's not that the decision Scott ends up making is so confounding --- it's not, really; it struck me as a perfectly reasonable solution to the X-Men's problems --- it's just that he did a lot of weird, out-of-character stuff leading up to the big decision that didn't seem necessary to me. The whole plot seemed like that; stuff thrown in there for no good reason, adding awkward elements that made characters act against their interests and values too often. So there you go: potentially promising storyline derailed by overly chaotic plotting, too many characters and disappointingly weak characterization and dialogue.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Greg (adds 2 TBR list daily) Hersom

    Love all thing Dark Avengers and this one did not disappoint, as Osborn born brings some mutants into his fold.

  10. 4 out of 5

    J'aime

    I don't read the X-Men series. All that I have read of the X-Men are through the lens of a Marvel crossover event, like House of M and Civil War. Therefore, I didn't have any issue with how this book holds up vis-á-vis the X-Men's own line. As a collection connected with Dark Reign, I thought it was excellent. During Secret Invasion, Norman Osborn stole the information needed to kill the Skrull queen in order to set himself up as a hero. It worked perfectly. The resulting period is called the Dar I don't read the X-Men series. All that I have read of the X-Men are through the lens of a Marvel crossover event, like House of M and Civil War. Therefore, I didn't have any issue with how this book holds up vis-á-vis the X-Men's own line. As a collection connected with Dark Reign, I thought it was excellent. During Secret Invasion, Norman Osborn stole the information needed to kill the Skrull queen in order to set himself up as a hero. It worked perfectly. The resulting period is called the Dark Reign, when he becomes head of SHIELD né HAMMER and US national security. He creates his own team of "Dark Avengers," each a villain masquerading as a familiar hero. After riots break out in San Francisco between mutants and the anti-mutant "Humanity Now", Norman decides he needs a team of Dark X-Men to control the situation. Emma Frost seemingly betrays Scott Summers to join and lead Osborn's new team which includes: Daken, Cloak and Dagger, Namor, Omega Man and Mimic. Osborn is also working with a Dark Beast (from another dimension!) to nullify mutant powers. Emma's team is sent in to enforce martial law and curfew on the city. What follows, and covers the first half of the book, are some exceptionally well done battle sequences and the fulfillment of a master plan carefully orchestrated by Scott Summers. I've never been a big fan of Cyclops, but here he truly shines as a leader and strategist. Emma Frost also steps away from the one dimensional "White Queen" role and finally becomes interesting as a power player. Despite bringing his Avengers in, Norman can't get the mutants under control. There are several mutants I don't recognize among the students, but there were enough familiar faces, and just enough character development that it didn't impede my enjoyment of the story at all. The second half of the book backtracks, which at first was confusing to me. It starts with the first part of a confession between Emma and Scott, which stops midway through and is picked up later, and then it jumps to Rogue and Gambit being summoned to San Francisco to aid Scott. Readers then get the previous event from their POV. Though this could have been better laid out, I still was able to follow what was happening, and it was strong material. The second half also includes the "origin" for each Dark X-Man, or how Osborn lured/coerced them onto the team. The book concludes with one recruit who got the better of Osborn and got away! Overall, I thought this was an excellent collection, with some of the best action sequences I've read and a well done plot arc. Osborn and Summers play a deadly game of chess that has some nice twists and was very entertaining. And, the book adds to the overall big picture of the Dark Reign. Highly recommended.

  11. 4 out of 5

    William Thomas

    Matt Fraction is not my favorite writer in the Marvel Universe. In fact, I think he is one of the laziest writers on the roster. And that's saying a lot coming from the Marvel universe these days where lazy is par for the course. With that said, Matt Fraction doesn't disappoint- because I had no hope whatsoever in him to begin with. The purpose of this book is clear from the title- a sales gimmick. A way to mash-up the new Dark Avengers into the world of mutants and sell more books between the tw Matt Fraction is not my favorite writer in the Marvel Universe. In fact, I think he is one of the laziest writers on the roster. And that's saying a lot coming from the Marvel universe these days where lazy is par for the course. With that said, Matt Fraction doesn't disappoint- because I had no hope whatsoever in him to begin with. The purpose of this book is clear from the title- a sales gimmick. A way to mash-up the new Dark Avengers into the world of mutants and sell more books between the two. It adds nothing to the characters, tells us nothing new about the world they inhabit, and has no value in the continuity of the universe. Instead of showing us a linear, moving portrait of racism and hatred as the X-Men so often does, it gives us a choppy, fractured comic book with every superhero in the Marvel lineup splashed on the pages like a comic book orgy. The characterization is weak and the layouts are so confusing, it's hard to follow from page to page. The main focus should have been between Trask and the mutants. Focusing on the race-hatred between human and mutant. The Avengers should have been a secondary backdrop against that struggle in order to mock the totalitarian style of government being formed in the Marvel Universe since Civil War. But here we just get a bunch of heroes fighting heroes and villains and then that's the end. I thought the artwork would have been a saving grace. When I saw that Marc Silvestri had the art credit for this book, I thought I would see a return to form in the X books I remembered when I was 11. Unfortunately, the artwork was a sloppy mess as if Rob Liefeld had gone over the pencils in crayon. So Matt Fraction has served us up a worthless piece of dog crap that should stay in the back issue bins along with all the 1987 Teen Titans issues. The X-Men have a special place in my heart, but series like this weaken my nostalgia in small doses.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    This was pretty good, but it did have some problems. First of all, it goes on a bit long. After the main story, we get a host of other stories that either go back over events that have already been resolved (but from a different POV) or talk about characters that not many people likely care very much about (like Mimic). Next, since when did everyone get a healing factor? A few people get the crap stabbed out of them during this story and then they are back to being perfectly fine a few panels la This was pretty good, but it did have some problems. First of all, it goes on a bit long. After the main story, we get a host of other stories that either go back over events that have already been resolved (but from a different POV) or talk about characters that not many people likely care very much about (like Mimic). Next, since when did everyone get a healing factor? A few people get the crap stabbed out of them during this story and then they are back to being perfectly fine a few panels later. I even looked some of these characters up to see if they had some kind of healing factor that I didn't know about and they don't. If everybody instantly heals now, it makes people with that power a little less cool and a little more common. It also makes battles a little less dramatic. Also, there are a lot of ball in the air and if you haven't been following X-Men comics you might get a bit confused about who is who and what is going on (I know I did). Finally, the art was all over the place. Some of it was really good, and some of it was a "take your kid to work day" project. My suggestion is to read the main story and skip over a lot of the extra content unless there is something there that you would really like (such as the Rogue story for Rogue fans, or the "confessions" story for Scott/Frost fans).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elin the Lightship

    Well, this is a crossover. The story is a bit confusing at times and the art varies from ok to exceptional. Was actually two different pages I wanted to tear out and hang on my wall, that's how good some parts are. And the confusing bit is actually refreshing. I'm tired of everything adapting to the casual reader with explaining everything and lots of throwsbacks. Sure, some more details could've been nice every once in a while but it didn't bother me. It made it interesting. Seeing both sides, o Well, this is a crossover. The story is a bit confusing at times and the art varies from ok to exceptional. Was actually two different pages I wanted to tear out and hang on my wall, that's how good some parts are. And the confusing bit is actually refreshing. I'm tired of everything adapting to the casual reader with explaining everything and lots of throwsbacks. Sure, some more details could've been nice every once in a while but it didn't bother me. It made it interesting. Seeing both sides, or three sides. The Dark Avengers, Osborn's Dark X-Men & Cyclops little gang of muties. Trying to figure out how Norman Osborn works is not the easiest. Is he still the villain? What does he want?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    Parts of this were thrilling, especially for those of us familiar with the histories of most of the characters involved. This world of the "Marvel Universes" which for me is something of a cross between mythology and soap opera, this world of powers and personalities can be magical if it is handled consistently both in terms of content and quality. Quality is one thing that is lacking at times in these story compilations with many different writers and artists, so while I really dug this on the Parts of this were thrilling, especially for those of us familiar with the histories of most of the characters involved. This world of the "Marvel Universes" which for me is something of a cross between mythology and soap opera, this world of powers and personalities can be magical if it is handled consistently both in terms of content and quality. Quality is one thing that is lacking at times in these story compilations with many different writers and artists, so while I really dug this on the whole, there were parts that could have been stronger.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    Gotta say this was a good book. Norman Osborn is in full stride taking on the world. I especially liked the whole dark x men and avengers. Great character development, tons of action, overall good writing. Colossus vs venom, I needed more!!!! Side note: only half of this book is the utopia story, lots of side stories. Some good some bad

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nii Books

    3.5 This was an interesting event, and as far as x-men events go, quite simple. However that did make is a little lacking. Emma's character, as intriguing as it normally is, was a little one dimensional in the main issues. We also had to wait a while to actually see some action from the X-men. I did however really like the side stories 'X-men Utopia: Confession' and the two X-men Legacy issues.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt Shaqfan

    (softcover) The single review quote on the back of this book says "...(Fraction and Silvestri) set up Marvel's big summer crossover in and interesting, complex way." 'Intersting'?!!! 'Complex'?! Those are some killer adjectives... Uhhh, yeah. I think that reviewer was just trying not to be mean, cause honestly the main story was pretty weak, and although I really like Fraction's work on IRON MAN, this didn't do much for me. Kept my interest I guess, but after the main six-chapter arc, I actually e (softcover) The single review quote on the back of this book says "...(Fraction and Silvestri) set up Marvel's big summer crossover in and interesting, complex way." 'Intersting'?!!! 'Complex'?! Those are some killer adjectives... Uhhh, yeah. I think that reviewer was just trying not to be mean, cause honestly the main story was pretty weak, and although I really like Fraction's work on IRON MAN, this didn't do much for me. Kept my interest I guess, but after the main six-chapter arc, I actually enjoyed all the extra side stories and mini series also included in this trade, much more. I think there was supposed to be this amazing 'twist' (Cyclop's secret plan or whatever) in the main story, but it just lacked that "OOMF!" Fraction might have been going for. At $35 it's still a better deal than if you got the single issues, but there might be better stuff out there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ernest

    I have mixed feelings about this volume. As an X-Men fan (and Marvel fan generally), I really liked seeing how everything connects together and the story plays out. The art is generally well done, if a little large in each page (there could be more panels per page). Yet, there is something ultimately something lacking in this volume-I cannot figure out whether it is there sheer volume of the Marvel universe (one really needs an understanding of the world to properly understand and appreciate thi I have mixed feelings about this volume. As an X-Men fan (and Marvel fan generally), I really liked seeing how everything connects together and the story plays out. The art is generally well done, if a little large in each page (there could be more panels per page). Yet, there is something ultimately something lacking in this volume-I cannot figure out whether it is there sheer volume of the Marvel universe (one really needs an understanding of the world to properly understand and appreciate this volume), the number of characters that need to be portrayed or some puzzling characterisations (especially Namor). While an X-Men (and Marvel) fan will still get something out of this work, this is not one for the casual reader.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    3.5 Stars All the plots of the past few years (X-Men moving to San Francisco; rise of Anti-Mutant legislation; Illuminati; Dark X-Men; re-creation of X-Force; Dark Avengers; H.A.M.M.E.R. replacing S.H.I.E.L.D. at the end of Secret Invasion; the whole Mutant Messiah plotline; etc) come to a head here in Utopia. Most of the story is fighting and the execution of a cleverly placed plot. Everyone faces off and battles, then suddenly, the island of Alcatraz rises up more fully from the water, and is d 3.5 Stars All the plots of the past few years (X-Men moving to San Francisco; rise of Anti-Mutant legislation; Illuminati; Dark X-Men; re-creation of X-Force; Dark Avengers; H.A.M.M.E.R. replacing S.H.I.E.L.D. at the end of Secret Invasion; the whole Mutant Messiah plotline; etc) come to a head here in Utopia. Most of the story is fighting and the execution of a cleverly placed plot. Everyone faces off and battles, then suddenly, the island of Alcatraz rises up more fully from the water, and is declared the new mutant Utopia. Mutants begin to flock like crazy to it and they declare themselves a separate nation, and as such, the "Avengers" need to clear out. Pretty straight forward book, good action, but again, I need to fully read a crossover to be fully satisfied I guess. Recommend.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    Things weren't given a fair go in San Francisco... because along came the Norman Osborn and his Dark Reign. The X-Men find themselves out maneuvered and out gunned by mutant bigotry, the Dark Avengers... and the Dark X-Men!!! But all is not loss, Cyclops has a plan,. After... over 35 years getting there the fruit of Cyclops leadership and experience is all that stands between the end of the mutants! Anything Dark Reign was golden for me... even this... a solid 8 out of 12.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    This collection was put together in an incompetent manner. I never understand why editors at Marvel, when putting together these collections, put the story together by title, rather than chronological order. The three issues of Dark X-Men The Beginning at the nd of the volume, should have been the first three issues of the trade. The X-Men Legacy issues sandwiched between the main Utopia story and the Dark X-Men The Beginning, should actually have gone between the second and third issues of the m This collection was put together in an incompetent manner. I never understand why editors at Marvel, when putting together these collections, put the story together by title, rather than chronological order. The three issues of Dark X-Men The Beginning at the nd of the volume, should have been the first three issues of the trade. The X-Men Legacy issues sandwiched between the main Utopia story and the Dark X-Men The Beginning, should actually have gone between the second and third issues of the main Utopia storyline. Editorial issues aside, the story is a bit of a mess. It starts strong, with an alarming allegory to modern day protesting against Nazis (anti-mutant groups) and Trump (Norman Osborn during Dark Reign) but then doesn't know quite where to go. It frequently jumps between characters, giving the appearance of a story but never showing the interesting bits. It's still better than a bunch of the other Dark Reign era books, and Fraction's dialogue is, at least, enjoyable. The art even manages to be fairly colorful, which is a rarity during the Mud Reign era. I recommend it for its importance in X-Men continuity (it establishes Utopia) and for fans of the silly into narration boes that were en vogue in the early 2010s.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nick Scott

    Some of my opinions on this may have to do with the fact that I am not someone who is familiar with the ins and outs of the Marvel timeline, so I'll put that out there in advance. There are a ton of characters in this book, many of whom the comic assumed I would care about or have some kind of connection to, and that was not the case. There seemed to be quite a bit of stuff in here that was thrown out there then never referenced again within the storyline. I'm also confused by the order the issue Some of my opinions on this may have to do with the fact that I am not someone who is familiar with the ins and outs of the Marvel timeline, so I'll put that out there in advance. There are a ton of characters in this book, many of whom the comic assumed I would care about or have some kind of connection to, and that was not the case. There seemed to be quite a bit of stuff in here that was thrown out there then never referenced again within the storyline. I'm also confused by the order the issue were arranged in. You get the main storyline in the first half, but then the second half is Norman Osbourne recruiting all the members of his team for the missions seen in the first half. Overall it felt like a crowded mess full of a bunch of half-ideas and characters I wasn't particularly into.

  23. 4 out of 5

    C.J. Edmunds

    The vision or dream of Utopia itself apart from a fleeting one, is truly ambitious. But to collect several issues of Dark Avengers and Uncanny X-men in the hopes of establishing coherence in one continuous read is definitely no easy feat either. This graphic novel collects Uncanny X-men #513-#514; Dark Avengers #7-8; Dark X-Men The Beginning: #1-3; X-Men Legacy #226-#227; Dark X-men: The Confession and material from Dark Reign: The Cabal. This collection released last year 2010 and written by Mat The vision or dream of Utopia itself apart from a fleeting one, is truly ambitious. But to collect several issues of Dark Avengers and Uncanny X-men in the hopes of establishing coherence in one continuous read is definitely no easy feat either. This graphic novel collects Uncanny X-men #513-#514; Dark Avengers #7-8; Dark X-Men The Beginning: #1-3; X-Men Legacy #226-#227; Dark X-men: The Confession and material from Dark Reign: The Cabal. This collection released last year 2010 and written by Matt Fraction brings together the 2 most popular superhero teams of the Marvel universe, namely The Avengers and The X-men. But for uninitiated readers who will dive into this seeking current and updated clarification, they may be confused as the heroes they knew have taken not only a dive but a 180 degree turn. Here’s the lowdown. At this point in the story, the Avengers have disassembled and Tony Stark, aka. Iron Man has been deposed from leading the Avengers following his debacle in handling events concerning the Skrull infiltration of superheroes in the Marvel event, Secret Invasion, which if I may add was brilliantly conceived by Brian Bendis. The current hero of this tale ironically became Norman Osborn, aka. Green Goblin. Yes, the Spider Man villain killed the Skrull Queen and became a hero. Fast forward, he now leads the Avengers and is the darling of the US govt in all things “mutant”. To this he has re-shaped the Avengers and used the symbolism that our heroes represent and warped it into his own. In replacement of Iron Man, he took Stark technology, crafted himself an armor and calls himself Iron Patriot. He then hired Daredevil nemesis, Bullseye, and had him become Hawkeye. Venom was recruited to take the place of Peter Parker, aka. Spider Man while Daken, Wolverine’s son became the adamantium wielding hero and Dr. Karla Sofen who has the powers of flight, intangibility and energy blasts, became Ms. Marvel. Add to this roster the presence of the godlike superhero but psychotic Sentry and Ares the God of War and you have the New Avengers. Onto our favorite Mutants this time, Scott Summers aka. Cyclops is now the leader of the X-men with Storm now based in Wakanda and living the life of queen and wife to Black Panther. Former villainess and now teacher, Emma Frost, aka. The White Queen is now with the X-men and 2nd in command in addition to being current love of Cyclops’s life. Unfortunately Beast and Professor Charles Xavier have been captured by Osborn and is currently being forced to take part in an experiment to drain mutants of their powers to feed his other team member of the Dark Avengers, Michael Pointer, aka. Weapon Omega. The experiment is funded by Osborn and headed by (don’t hold your breath), Beast or should I say Dark Beast as he is an evil Dr. McCoy from another timeline. (now scratch your head and say, Huh?) Our compilation opens with riots in San Francisco being led by Simon Trask. Yes, we remember him from Sentinel days of early X-men and has been causing a lot of anti-mutant sentiment around the area. Cyclops although trying his best to contain the incident by having other X-men members take care of it has not been successful and was branded as “incapable” by the media to govern and police mutantkind. On top of that Osborn has just come in from New York, in line with the rumors that San Francisco is about to be “federalized”. Needless to say Osborn has his Dark Avengers in tow and is encroaching upon X-men territory. The clash between two teams ensues as it is unavoidable and leads to both betrayal and deception on Emma Frost’s part to form her own team of X-men to handle the rising threat of anti-mutant sentiment and superhero withdrawal from the populace. With the X-men team divided and Osborn’s Dark Avengers looking united and certainly a force to be reckoned, how can resolution be achieved? Of course, with utmost planning and some trust along the way. My friend lent me this compilation and promised me all out action. Indeed I was and am happy for it. Just like my other favorite Marvel event, Siege, this compilation was indeed energy blasting-knuckle punch action all the way, with more intricate power playing and secret hiding along the way for proper garnishing. Not everything is what it seems in his story and although you would applaud Scott Summers’ plan after reading, you may just applaud Emma Frost’s nerve and will as well when you get to the end. Betrayal is trust, is certainly a operative word phrase in this storyline. But alas the Utopia storyline itself is only a little half into the entire book and others are more side stories that we never got to see or as other readers complained, need not see as it was pointless and didn’t really drive the narrative forward. True, the back stories about the X-men villain, Mimic, and how he got drafted to join Osborne as well as Raven Darkholme, aka. Mystique, plus Cloak and Dagger as well as Daken and how Emma convinced Namor to join her cause as the ace up her sleeve may be well and good and certainly gives readers a deeper look. But frankly I never liked Namor and so skipped his story. Don’t necessarily see the bond that he and Emma have, much less the “he smells like fish” reference in Cabal is equally off putting for me. Would you sleep with a superhero who smells like that? LOL! Ok digressing but all in all it was an ok read. I still rank Civil War, Secret Invasion and Siege as my favorite all time Marvel crisis stories and hoping for a good one when the current Fear Itself storyline is compiled. Here’s to a good attempt Matt Fraction but here’s to more Brian Bendis for me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Really awesome overall, although it was a tad disjointed and inconsistent. I loved the premise. It started off really strong. Emma Frost remains the most interesting mutant, as is custom in the post morrison X-Men. Towards the middle of the main arc, I became a bit confused as to who was motivated by what... but the ending is epic as hell, so it all worked out. The art fluctuates. This is an ensemble piece. None of it was bad, but much of it was outstanding. I was happy to have read all the leadup Really awesome overall, although it was a tad disjointed and inconsistent. I loved the premise. It started off really strong. Emma Frost remains the most interesting mutant, as is custom in the post morrison X-Men. Towards the middle of the main arc, I became a bit confused as to who was motivated by what... but the ending is epic as hell, so it all worked out. The art fluctuates. This is an ensemble piece. None of it was bad, but much of it was outstanding. I was happy to have read all the leadup for this event. I felt like I had some great context/head canon/whatever, and it made the book much more enjoyable. Not the best X event of that decade... but still pretty damn good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Luis

    This event takes place during a time where Norman Osborn (in a style like Lex Luthor) is trying to take over the world. He's the head of H.A.M.M.E.R which had replaced S.H.I.E.L.D and even created his own Avengers team. Now he has made his own X-men team during the San Franciso riots between Mutants and Anti-mutants in an attempt to restore peace and bring good PR to himself. This is really lackluster. At the end of the day, all of this boils down to Scott Summers and his X-men having to create This event takes place during a time where Norman Osborn (in a style like Lex Luthor) is trying to take over the world. He's the head of H.A.M.M.E.R which had replaced S.H.I.E.L.D and even created his own Avengers team. Now he has made his own X-men team during the San Franciso riots between Mutants and Anti-mutants in an attempt to restore peace and bring good PR to himself. This is really lackluster. At the end of the day, all of this boils down to Scott Summers and his X-men having to create Utopia for mutants.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    I read this one flipping back and forth to put the "Dark X-Men Beginnings" issues in between the regular story. Still not quite sold on that ordering. The main story here is surprisingly lean, with small but effective character arcs. Norman Osborn and Emma Frost are easily the most prominent characters, and that works well enough. I do love Dark Beast. The usual mix of art, with Terry Dodson beauty showing up on seemingly random pages. Luckily no Greg Land to be found. The actual politics of wha I read this one flipping back and forth to put the "Dark X-Men Beginnings" issues in between the regular story. Still not quite sold on that ordering. The main story here is surprisingly lean, with small but effective character arcs. Norman Osborn and Emma Frost are easily the most prominent characters, and that works well enough. I do love Dark Beast. The usual mix of art, with Terry Dodson beauty showing up on seemingly random pages. Luckily no Greg Land to be found. The actual politics of what happens in the story is somewhat confusing, but just go with it and it's a fun story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men: Utopia and Exodus, Uncanny X-Men issues #513-514, Dark Avengers issues #7-8, Dark X-Men: The Beginning issues #1-3, X-Men Legacy issues #226-227, Dark X-Men: The Confession, and material from Dark Reign: The Cabal The story in this collection ties into the "Dark Reign" era of Marvel history. Norman Osborn leads his Dark Avengers, and he commissions Emma Frost to lead a team of Dark X-Men.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    3.5. It’s funny, I read this whole thing w/o realizing that it was Matt Fraction. That makes sense, because it was a lot better than I expected. The whole Dark Avengers thing has been better than I expect going in. Less about the content & more about the collection: I don’t like these miscellanea conglomerations of different titles glued together. I feel like I get to the end & it’s all ingredients but no actual meal. 3.5. It’s funny, I read this whole thing w/o realizing that it was Matt Fraction. That makes sense, because it was a lot better than I expected. The whole Dark Avengers thing has been better than I expect going in. Less about the content & more about the collection: I don’t like these miscellanea conglomerations of different titles glued together. I feel like I get to the end & it’s all ingredients but no actual meal.

  29. 4 out of 5

    C

    Continuing the great x-read of 2017/2018... I was pretty much done with Dark Reign as soon as it started. This book is a mess - out of order and more boring than an action-packed crossover has any right to be. Add stars if you actually care about Norman Osborn. Heck, on a day when I was less ticked off at the world, I would probably add another star. I've read worse comics.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin josue Hernandez

    Decent one At first I was like why the hell l did I buy this ! But then it's started to become better and better . Has a lot of action for those who likes that . Don't do the same mistake i was about to do of buying dark X-Men confession and dark xmen the beginning. They come with the comic book

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