free hit counter code The Long Quiche Goodbye - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Long Quiche Goodbye

Availability: Ready to download

Welcome to the grand opening of Fromagerie Bessette. Or as it's more commonly known by the residents of small-town Providence, Ohio-the Cheese Shop. Proprietor Charlotte Bessette has prepared a delightful sampling of bold Cabot Clothbound Cheddar, delicious tortes of Stilton and Mascarpone, and a taste of Sauvignon Blanc-but someone else has decided to make a little crime Welcome to the grand opening of Fromagerie Bessette. Or as it's more commonly known by the residents of small-town Providence, Ohio-the Cheese Shop. Proprietor Charlotte Bessette has prepared a delightful sampling of bold Cabot Clothbound Cheddar, delicious tortes of Stilton and Mascarpone, and a taste of Sauvignon Blanc-but someone else has decided to make a little crime of passion the piece de resistance. Right outside the shop Charlotte finds a body, the victim stabbed to death with one of her prized olive-wood handled knives.


Compare
Ads Banner

Welcome to the grand opening of Fromagerie Bessette. Or as it's more commonly known by the residents of small-town Providence, Ohio-the Cheese Shop. Proprietor Charlotte Bessette has prepared a delightful sampling of bold Cabot Clothbound Cheddar, delicious tortes of Stilton and Mascarpone, and a taste of Sauvignon Blanc-but someone else has decided to make a little crime Welcome to the grand opening of Fromagerie Bessette. Or as it's more commonly known by the residents of small-town Providence, Ohio-the Cheese Shop. Proprietor Charlotte Bessette has prepared a delightful sampling of bold Cabot Clothbound Cheddar, delicious tortes of Stilton and Mascarpone, and a taste of Sauvignon Blanc-but someone else has decided to make a little crime of passion the piece de resistance. Right outside the shop Charlotte finds a body, the victim stabbed to death with one of her prized olive-wood handled knives.

30 review for The Long Quiche Goodbye

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    2.5 stars. I had heard a number of good things about The Long Quiche Goodbye, but my excitement was ultimately rewarded with disappointment. I'm really on the fence as to what I felt about this book. I neither liked nor disliked it, and I could see a lot of potential for this to become a great series. It just didn't fall into place here. Firstly, I must say I loved everything to do with The Cheese Shop. I like cheese, but I don't have many opportunities to eat any, and frankly my knowledge of it 2.5 stars. I had heard a number of good things about The Long Quiche Goodbye, but my excitement was ultimately rewarded with disappointment. I'm really on the fence as to what I felt about this book. I neither liked nor disliked it, and I could see a lot of potential for this to become a great series. It just didn't fall into place here. Firstly, I must say I loved everything to do with The Cheese Shop. I like cheese, but I don't have many opportunities to eat any, and frankly my knowledge of it barely stretches to telling mozzarella apart from cheddar. That said, I never found the cheese talk overdone or confusing. I picked up interesting tips about various cheeses when Charlotte made sales to customers and she partakes in a few delicious-sounding cheese dishes along the way that really made my mouth water. I felt that Charlotte was actually at her best when she was working in the shop; she's a capable businesswoman and is clearly passionate and possesses expertise regarding her topic. Unfortunately, the characters and setting were weak, weak, weak. Aside from The Cheese Shop, I couldn't get any picture of what the town was like. I had actually forgotten the setting by halfway. As for Charlotte, our main character, I alternated between liking her and being so frustrated with her that I wanted to reach into the book and give her a heavy dose of reality check. She has an adorably warm relationship with her grandparents, but it's impossible to describe her as anything other than a nosey parker when she's around her cousin Matthew and her friends. Charlotte feels an inexplicable need to quiz people on their relationships and give unneeded and unwanted advice because of her "motherly instinct." Charlotte's first reaction to hearing that Rebecca has a date with someone is to warn her against her youth, but the girl is 22! I could also ignore her penchant for minding others' business for them if she didn't have such a tendency to overreact or jump to conclusions based on circumstantial evidence. She constantly calls Chief Urso to pass him the latest bit of "information" that she's picked up. Normally I'd cheer, because so many amateur sleuths nearly get themselves killed because they simply won't give perfectly capable policemen the information they have, but here, Charlotte calls Urso with tidbits such as, "Have you investigated (view spoiler)[Kristine Woodhouse's (hide spoiler)] gloves? She might have bloody gloves!" Duh, woman. If she wasn't having one of those laughable lightbulb moments (it's tragic considering she's supposed to be academically gifted), she's phoning the police with a piece of silly gossip she picked up at the bar. I'm surprised Urso didn't strangle her from irritation. What makes all this even more unbearable is that her friends praise her for being the town's own "Nancy Drew", and Charlotte herself refers to what she's doing as "sleuthing" and "investigation." Oh, please. Aside from Charlotte, the rest of the characters all melt into one entity. I can't tell any of Charlotte's friends apart, and Kristine's lackeys are more like one person with different names. There are numerous other people scattered about town, but they aren't more than cameo appearances who are mentioned here and there, forcing me to backtrack and work out who they are. Charlotte's love interest, Jordan, shows up about 3-4 times and only gets a sentence in before he's interrupted. By the end of the book, I still didn't know the first thing about him and clearly neither did Charlotte, despite her ridiculously immature, school-girl crush on him (she's either admiring his attractiveness or moaning that he isn't interested in her). The "murder mystery" portion was an excuse for Charlotte to run around town accusing almost everyone but the real culprit. There was no suspense or build-up; when the murder occurred, I just blinked and couldn't care less. Having said all this, I still believe that the series has potential somewhere. Perhaps if the author made Charlotte act her age (she's in her 30s) and remove that mile-wide silly streak, we could be onto something. The constant and annoying referencing of CSI needs to stop, too. I'll be checking out Lost and Fondue in the hopes that things will improve - and really, I do like the cheese aspect. Fingers crossed!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Riccarla Roman

    When Agatha Christie wrote the Miss Marple series about a little old lady in a sleepy village solving mysteries, they were called "cozies", nice, little domestic situations. I have noticed a prolific number of new mysteries for a niche market that I call "crafties". These are mysteries set in a small town that depends on tourism to survive. They turn their downtown areas into quaint little villages with all kinds of little specialty shops. The mystery (usually a murder of someone nobody likes) i When Agatha Christie wrote the Miss Marple series about a little old lady in a sleepy village solving mysteries, they were called "cozies", nice, little domestic situations. I have noticed a prolific number of new mysteries for a niche market that I call "crafties". These are mysteries set in a small town that depends on tourism to survive. They turn their downtown areas into quaint little villages with all kinds of little specialty shops. The mystery (usually a murder of someone nobody likes) is solved by the heroine who runs the local scrapbooking shop, flower shop, bakery, bookstore, knitting/sewing/crocheting shop, beauty shop, or, as in this book, the cheese/wine shop. In Ohio. The heroine, Charlotte is single (after a bad break-up) and has taken over the shop run by her grandparents. Her cousin, whose wife left him with twin daughters to care for, runs the wine part. When a local businessman with wandering hands who owns most of the town is found murdered outside of the cheese shop with one of her knives ( clutched in the bloody hand of her Grandmere ), then Charlotte must uncover the truth. There are the requisite quirky character townsfolk and the mysterious hunk who attracts the heroine. Her relatives are artsy and eccentric, rubbing the proper townspeople the wrong way. Along the way, the mystery is solved, but the real attraction of these "crafties" is wondering if she will ever get together with Mr. Hunk and hoping one of your favorite odd character won't get killed or kill anyone else in the next book. It's a cute, fun read and it really made me want to try some of the exotic cheeses mentioned in the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lorna Barrett

    This is a terrific story. I loved all the "cheesy" references and was happy to give Avery a blurb for the cover of the book. (Love Charlotte Bessette and her whole family.) Here's what I wrote for the blurb: Avery Ames's delightful debut novel, The Long Quiche Goodbye, ia lovely Tour de Fromage. It's not just gouda, it's great! Can't wait for the next installment.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I bought this book awhile ago when I decided to pick up some Agatha Award winning titles, and to tell the truth, I was slightly disappointed with this. The setting was amazing, the author did a superb job of making me see this part of Ohio with clarity and ease. But, the characters were flat, and sometimes annoying. I found the main character to be almost arrogant at the beginning of the book, though she got tons better by the end. And her cousin, where do I start with him? I absolutely could not I bought this book awhile ago when I decided to pick up some Agatha Award winning titles, and to tell the truth, I was slightly disappointed with this. The setting was amazing, the author did a superb job of making me see this part of Ohio with clarity and ease. But, the characters were flat, and sometimes annoying. I found the main character to be almost arrogant at the beginning of the book, though she got tons better by the end. And her cousin, where do I start with him? I absolutely could not stand Matthew. I felt that he was a bad father and a bad character. First of all Charlotte does a lot more parenting than him throughout the book, and secondly, he can't spend time with the girls because of the relationship he has with Charlotte's best friend? No. Besides him, Meredith was also flat and unlikeable, to me. She was supposed to be Charlotte's friend but she can't tell Charlotte that she's dating Charlotte's cousin? And she avoids Charlotte to avoid telling her? No, I think that if she really loved Charlotte and Matthew she would have told Charlotte to begin with. There were also a few minor inconsistencies, though none that affected the plot. Speaking of the plot, I thought it was grand, I didn't guess the killer until Charlotte did, and I loved the way the mystery fit together. Overall not a bad book, just a few bad characters and a few inconsistencies. I still want to read the next book, however, because I like the characters (besides Meredith and Matthew) and I adore the setting.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cece

    Overall concept: B-. Return to hometown to nurse broken heart (x2) go into business, meet new potential romance......been done before-better. Mystery: B- pink herrings at best Setting: B-charming small town, adorable shop.....been done before, but it is nice to read about a dream location Characters: C-. Shallow and cliche characters who do not act consistently-characters in mysteries MUST be consistent. It's a rule. Secondary characters are dizzyingly staccato. Motivations are sketchy or missing, Overall concept: B-. Return to hometown to nurse broken heart (x2) go into business, meet new potential romance......been done before-better. Mystery: B- pink herrings at best Setting: B-charming small town, adorable shop.....been done before, but it is nice to read about a dream location Characters: C-. Shallow and cliche characters who do not act consistently-characters in mysteries MUST be consistent. It's a rule. Secondary characters are dizzyingly staccato. Motivations are sketchy or missing, actions often have no rhyme or reason-this will be the downfall of this series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tari

    I love that it's set in Ohio The town of Providence, Ohio (in the story not the real one) is so well described I could just picture the shops and the people. The characters were like old friends and it took me no time to get totally engrossed in this book-in fact I read it in one day. The clues and red herrings were good and I didn't guess the killer. I have to say I just love the character Rebecca and her obsession with TV mystery and police procedurals since she likes all the same shows I do. I love that it's set in Ohio The town of Providence, Ohio (in the story not the real one) is so well described I could just picture the shops and the people. The characters were like old friends and it took me no time to get totally engrossed in this book-in fact I read it in one day. The clues and red herrings were good and I didn't guess the killer. I have to say I just love the character Rebecca and her obsession with TV mystery and police procedurals since she likes all the same shows I do. She really proved that her shows could be useful! I'm definitely reading the next book!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancy H

    In the first of the Cheese Shop Mystery series, Charlotte Bessette and her brother Matthew are in charge of the family's cheese and wine shop in Providence, Ohio. When a man is murdered right in front of their shop during a cheese-and-wine tasting and her grandmother is arrested for the murder, Charlotte must do everything she can to unmask the real killer and save her innocent grandmother from prison. When many of her suspects turn out to have air-tight alibis, she must look in unexpected direc In the first of the Cheese Shop Mystery series, Charlotte Bessette and her brother Matthew are in charge of the family's cheese and wine shop in Providence, Ohio. When a man is murdered right in front of their shop during a cheese-and-wine tasting and her grandmother is arrested for the murder, Charlotte must do everything she can to unmask the real killer and save her innocent grandmother from prison. When many of her suspects turn out to have air-tight alibis, she must look in unexpected directions to find the killer. This is a well-written, well-plotted mystery with great characters. Of course, reading about all of that cheese and wine just makes me want to eat!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    I love cheese. SO a cheese shop mystery - I HAD to read. I really liked Charlotte, her shop and her interesting family and friends. After a very unlikeable man (Ed) is killed outside her shop, her grandmother is accused and Charlotte sleuths around to find the killer. I did like that she shared all her information with the local cop and that he did follow up on her information. Not common with amateur sleuths. And I found the killer a really sad figure. Look forward to the next in the series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    After reading this book for daaaaaays, it seemed that it was never going to end - the "sleuth" just kept going around town bothering the same people with different questions and bossing the police chief around - and I realized that I just didn't care anymore. I skimmed the last few chapters and called it done. I did give an extra star because the language is clean and I liked the recipes at the end, but I probably won't be looking for more in this series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I lost a lot of respect for the main character when she broke up with her PASTRY CHEF boyfriend because he wanted to MOVE TO PARIS. She runs a cheese shop--I would think she would do quite well in Paris. She sees wanting to move to Paris as a character flaw. I didn't buy it. The rest of the characters are all standard cozy stock and this didn't hold my attention.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Robbins

    For complete review check out my blog at https://booksaplentybookreviews.blogs... For complete review check out my blog at https://booksaplentybookreviews.blogs...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ferne

    Charlotte Bessette and Cousin Matthew (former sommelier in one of Cleveland's finest restaurants) have taken over ownership of Fromagerie Bessette (The Cheese Shop) located in the little town of Providence, Ohio. After WWII, Charlotte’s grandfather (Pépère Etienne) and grandmother (Grandmère Bernadette) had migrated from France and were original owners of the shop prior to Pépère’s retirement. I haven't been so interested in tasting a variety of different kinds of cheese since reading, "The Cat Charlotte Bessette and Cousin Matthew (former sommelier in one of Cleveland's finest restaurants) have taken over ownership of Fromagerie Bessette (The Cheese Shop) located in the little town of Providence, Ohio. After WWII, Charlotte’s grandfather (Pépère Etienne) and grandmother (Grandmère Bernadette) had migrated from France and were original owners of the shop prior to Pépère’s retirement. I haven't been so interested in tasting a variety of different kinds of cheese since reading, "The Cat Who Said Cheese" (Book 18 in "Cat Who..." series) by Lilian Jackson Braun. However, since James Mackintosh Qwilleran (Qwill to his friends) only drinks Squunk water this novel entices one to go shopping for cheese and the appropriate wine pairing. Without a doubt in my mind, Qwill would love shopping at Fromagerie Bessette and his cats, Koko and Yum-Yum would relish their cheese treats. One of the other joyous features of any new cozy series is learning the names of the neighboring shops that always provide either an interesting "play on words" or at the very least creative names based on words associated with the type of shop or items one would buy in that shop’s venue. This neighborhood’s shops include: Mystic Moon Candle Boutique, Europa Antiques and Collectibles, Sew Inspired Quilt Shoppe, Nuts for Nails (hardware store), and Country Kitchen (50’s style diner across the street from Fromagerie Bessette). This story is a charming opening to a new series by Avery Aames (pseudonym of Daryl Wood Gerber) as there are so many avenues to pursue as the series continues with a new romance blooming for both Charlotte and single-parent Matthew of eight-year old twin girls, Clair and Amy. Rebecca is a 22-year old young woman who has left the Amish community not due to a loss of faith but to follow her choice to live in a less cloistered and modern world. As a clerk in Fromagerie Bessette, Rebecca demonstrates her value as an assistant to Charlotte not only as a clerk but is very adept as a sleuth assistant as she’s watched many episodes of "Murder She Wrote," varieties of the "CSI" franchise, and "Magnum, P.I." Bozz is creating the new website and helping with deliveries and either role could offer new avenues of intrigue, interest, and fun in the next storylines. From catering for local shopkeepers’ events to family dinners to Girls' Night Out time, food and wine are highlights so be sure you’re not hungry as you open the book as it might be hard not to venture to the kitchen. Thankfully I’m tucked between the covers for my nightly reading time so I was safe from any actual snacking. Chefs in the reader audience (and their families and friends invited to taste test) will be thrilled with the inclusion of 4 recipes. After the appetizing reading experience, the novel would make an excellent tool for any menu planning for a special event or holiday meal with the multitude of suggestions given in each chapter not only for pairings of cheese and wine but the delectable menu options savored by the characters as they enjoy their daily lives.

  13. 4 out of 5

    bella

    I love the cheesy titles of cozy mystery novels. There is SENTENCED TO DEATH and SPRINKLE WITH MURDER. The titles just scream at me "pick me up and read me" and of course I can't resist, as friends will tell you by my overflowing bookshelves. With all these cheesy novels, I decided that my next read would have to involve cheese, and you can't get more cheese than THE LONG QUICHE GOODBYE. THE LONG QUICHE GOODBYE is set the town of Province, with Charlotte and her cousin (and business partner) Matth I love the cheesy titles of cozy mystery novels. There is SENTENCED TO DEATH and SPRINKLE WITH MURDER. The titles just scream at me "pick me up and read me" and of course I can't resist, as friends will tell you by my overflowing bookshelves. With all these cheesy novels, I decided that my next read would have to involve cheese, and you can't get more cheese than THE LONG QUICHE GOODBYE. THE LONG QUICHE GOODBYE is set the town of Province, with Charlotte and her cousin (and business partner) Matthew celebrating the grand reopening of The Cheese Shop. However things don't go to plan when Ed, the richest man in town, is killed. The prime suspect is Charlotte's grandmother, and it's up to Charlotte to discover the real killer and prove that her grandmother is innocent. While it is often a mystery cliche to kill of the richest and most hated man in town, Avery Aames pulls it off perfectly. The mystery was absolute first class, and I was unable to put the book down until the very last chapter when I discovered the murderer! Lately I have picked the murderer long before the ending of the book, but with THE LONG QUICHE GOODBYE I was still guessing right up until the murderer was announced. I was a little shocked that I hadn't picked it up. The town of Providence has so many fantastic people. While Charlotte is a sweet character, it was her assistant, Rebecca, the amish girl who is now embracing modern life that I adored the most. Especially as she is trying to help Charlotte solve the crime, with tips that she has picked up on CSI and Magnum PI! All in all, a fantastic mystery. One that left me wanting to go to the supermarket to discover more cheeses! I will definitely be reading the next book in the series, LOST AND FONDUE.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Book Concierge

    Charlotte Besette and her cousin Matthew have taken over the cheese shop previously run by their grandparents. Their grand re-opening celebration is interrupted by a scream just outside their door, and when they rush to investigate they spy one of the shop’s special cheese knives sticking out of a dead man’s heart, and their beloved grandmother with the victim’s blood on her hands and splashed over her dress. This has all the ingredients for a promising cozy mystery set-up: small town business o Charlotte Besette and her cousin Matthew have taken over the cheese shop previously run by their grandparents. Their grand re-opening celebration is interrupted by a scream just outside their door, and when they rush to investigate they spy one of the shop’s special cheese knives sticking out of a dead man’s heart, and their beloved grandmother with the victim’s blood on her hands and splashed over her dress. This has all the ingredients for a promising cozy mystery set-up: small town business owner, some side bars re food and wine, a potential romantic rivalry (hunky new farmer vs town police chief), an amateur sleuth or two (including a young Amish woman who has left her community and is addicted to TV crime shows). The victim is a ruthless business man no one in town likes, so there are plenty of suspects and/or red herrings. The problem is that Aames is a terrible writer. Tears “splashed on my shoulder” or “drenched my sleeve.” People “scurry” or “glide” or “scuttle away.” Every once in a while she throws in an awkwardly worded simile to add color. Characters behave inconsistently, the dialogue is trite, and the entire scenario (especially the solution) is just not believable. I give it 1 star just because she has a good idea.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lori Henrich

    I loved the theme of this series of mysteries. I love cheese, maybe being from Wisconsin has something to do with it. The development of the characters, makes you fall in love with them. The twins were adorable and you just want to wrap them up in a hug. Rebecca, formerly Amish, has an exuberance that makes me chuckle. The Bessette family, the main characters of this story, are great. Charlotte reluctantly takes over the part of sleuth, amongst her other duties, to help save her Grandmother from I loved the theme of this series of mysteries. I love cheese, maybe being from Wisconsin has something to do with it. The development of the characters, makes you fall in love with them. The twins were adorable and you just want to wrap them up in a hug. Rebecca, formerly Amish, has an exuberance that makes me chuckle. The Bessette family, the main characters of this story, are great. Charlotte reluctantly takes over the part of sleuth, amongst her other duties, to help save her Grandmother from going to jail. The few recipes at the end of the book are a nice addition. I am looking forward to reading the other book in the series and those that are hopefully to come.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I usually enjoy cozy mysteries but this book was a bit too much cheese and gossip, not enough mystery. There are better ways to insert information about cheese than inserting a cold description every time a cheese name in mentioned. Each one broke me out of the story and made it feel like a book written for the cheese board. Ugh Also, the author followed the cozy mystery format to such an extreme that it becomes boring and trite. Barely made it through 5 chapters before I finally had to quit. I f I usually enjoy cozy mysteries but this book was a bit too much cheese and gossip, not enough mystery. There are better ways to insert information about cheese than inserting a cold description every time a cheese name in mentioned. Each one broke me out of the story and made it feel like a book written for the cheese board. Ugh Also, the author followed the cozy mystery format to such an extreme that it becomes boring and trite. Barely made it through 5 chapters before I finally had to quit. I fear reading the others of the series (though I will try)...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alissa Kowalski

    Cheesy, saucy, and everything in between! The Cheese Shop Mystery had it all! Charlotte as the nosy heroine flirting with danger? Check. French grandparents causing a ruckus about town? Check. Rebecca as an ex-Amish amateur detective using the sleuthing skills she's acquired through prime time crime dramas? Check. Jordan as the love interest / cheese maker / farmer with the mysterious past. CHECK. Fantastic supporting characters, an interesting crime of passion, surprising twist ending, and a co Cheesy, saucy, and everything in between! The Cheese Shop Mystery had it all! Charlotte as the nosy heroine flirting with danger? Check. French grandparents causing a ruckus about town? Check. Rebecca as an ex-Amish amateur detective using the sleuthing skills she's acquired through prime time crime dramas? Check. Jordan as the love interest / cheese maker / farmer with the mysterious past. CHECK. Fantastic supporting characters, an interesting crime of passion, surprising twist ending, and a cozy pet with TONS of potential (more Rags please).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I really enjoyed this kick off book for a new series and I am anxious to continue with it. Now I want to eat cheese...a lot of cheese.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    A cozy mystery set in a...cheese shop?!?! BE STILL MY HEART

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    Good first in series. I especially liked the tasty cheeses and cheese recipes...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Cornelius Ashby

    This is the first book in The Cheese Shop Mystery series. I loved this book! I’m hooked, and I will read every book in this cozy series. I enjoyed the warm characters, the town, and the murder mystery was very good. I loved the protagonist who is helping her cousin to raise his twin 8 year old daughters who have been abandoned by their wife and mother. This book is a winner!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    It's my own fault for picking a book that uses a cheese pun in it's title, and I should have known better. I tried to read the entire thing, but I just couldn't get past the first ten chapters. THE LONG QUICHE GOODBYE is a terribly written book set in a cheese shop of all places. I've read some of these niche mysteries before, and while they weren't great literature, they were enjoyable enough. Coffee shop--fine. Book store--sure. But cheese? Sorry. It's just not that interesting. Boring cheese It's my own fault for picking a book that uses a cheese pun in it's title, and I should have known better. I tried to read the entire thing, but I just couldn't get past the first ten chapters. THE LONG QUICHE GOODBYE is a terribly written book set in a cheese shop of all places. I've read some of these niche mysteries before, and while they weren't great literature, they were enjoyable enough. Coffee shop--fine. Book store--sure. But cheese? Sorry. It's just not that interesting. Boring cheese details aside, the book is just not well planned out. The author introduces way too many characters in the first chapter, and all of the people in this little town (which we are supposed to believe is a lovely place to live) are either drunks or angry or both. People of the town have an unusual and inexplicable hatred for the main character and her family, and in the short glimpse we get of the murder victim, we learn he's a vindictive landlord who likes to drink and flirt with women -- including one of his wife's best friends. You would think this would affect the wife's relationship with said friend, but you would be wrong. The main character's grandmother is found at the murder scene with blood on her hands and is accused of the crime and placed on house arrest. You'd think a murder on the sidewalk outside a cheese shop would elicit some sense of shock from the towns people, but not in this town. Finger pointing and nasty comments start almost immediately. The murdered man's wife struts around town the next day in an American flag ensemble because she was in the process of campaigning for mayor when her husband was killed. Charlotte (the main character and cheese shop proprietor)wants to clear her grandmother's name, but it's hard to imagine that happening when she is so quick to anger. At one point, she sees her assistant carrying a plate of cheese out to a group of reporters, and she grips the assistant's arm and yells at her to stop. The book is full of inconsistencies, and almost none of the characters behave in any way that even slightly resembles normal human behavior. The story felt rushed and disjointed. I usually hate to abandon a book, but in this case, I've got other things to read and better ways to use my time. The only memorable thing about this book is that I learned that the grass a cow eats will affect the way cheese tastes. While some may find the digestive process of cows fascinating, it's not my thing. In fact, I may never eat cheese again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Lewis

    I gave it two stars because there is a cute kitty, but..... First off, the book started with a way too familiar plot; ile., a new store is opening and a vengeful neighboring shop owner is determined to persecute the child of the person they have an age-old quarrel with. Second, to me, the book seemed more like a Peyton Place soap opera produced by the Cooking Channel. Between the discussions of food, a mystery broke out. In the same paragraph there would be one sentence mentioning the death, with I gave it two stars because there is a cute kitty, but..... First off, the book started with a way too familiar plot; ile., a new store is opening and a vengeful neighboring shop owner is determined to persecute the child of the person they have an age-old quarrel with. Second, to me, the book seemed more like a Peyton Place soap opera produced by the Cooking Channel. Between the discussions of food, a mystery broke out. In the same paragraph there would be one sentence mentioning the death, with 20 more describing the food being consumed. If I were suspected of murder, I don't think my mind would be on how creamy the cheese is with the aged smoky flavor on the special crisp cracker from YaYaville served with sparkling bubble-berry vintage wine in a nine-inch stemmed, rose stained, glass with silver trim one quarter down from the top and one-sixteenth wide, handpainted on by monks in Popville, and owned by my great-grandmother who died wearing a yellow dress with white dots and a ruffled collar with her three strap sandals in coral woven bluegrass.....well, you get the picture. And that was also part of the problem. Everything was so described. Every ruffle, color, shade, texture, style, attire, hairstyle, book cover - everything. I suspect the author was trying to make their book as "luscious" a read as the "luscious" Tuscan descriptions in one of the cookbooks. But for me, it was just too much. I'm fine with some descriptions to make the storyline work. But, I am quite fine with my imagination filling in the blanks. I don't need to know the color everyone is wearing, or what material all the chairs are coved in. A few here and there are fine, but to describe everything in such detail, nothing become special. And, frankly, for me, it all runs together after a little while. Most disappointing was how little mystery there was in the end. No, I did not figure out who did it. And I can't tell you if it ended well, or made sense or anything. There was so much soap opera drama, fashion, and food description and reviews, I really did not follow the plot. I was just glad to finish the book. Yes, I gave it two stars because there was a cute kitty in the story. And though there were some interactions between the main character and cute kitty, there was no real development. There were just instances that came across, to me, as being fit in so as to include a cute cat for those who will read because there is a cute cat in the story. I was disappointed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda McGill

    I really wanted to get on board with this novel (it's about a cheese shop!), but it was just so cheesy... Charlotte and her cousin, Matthew, are taking over their grandfather's cheese shop. After giving the shop a bit of a face lift, it's opening night and everyone in town is at the Cheese Shop. The party is cut short, after their landlord (and not so nice guy) is found dead and Charlotte's grandmother is standing over the body with the murder weapon and blood on her. Ok, I get it. If my grandmot I really wanted to get on board with this novel (it's about a cheese shop!), but it was just so cheesy... Charlotte and her cousin, Matthew, are taking over their grandfather's cheese shop. After giving the shop a bit of a face lift, it's opening night and everyone in town is at the Cheese Shop. The party is cut short, after their landlord (and not so nice guy) is found dead and Charlotte's grandmother is standing over the body with the murder weapon and blood on her. Ok, I get it. If my grandmother was falsely accused of murder, then I would want to do everything I could to free her. However, Charlotte just took things way out of hand and starts accusing everyone! I think the main problem I had with the novel is just how it didn't seem real. I kept rolling my eyes at Charlotte's thoughts because no one would actually think/say that. Her actions sure would of put off a lot of people too! Also the relationships between the characters were just off. Her cousin, Matthew, would randomly ditch his twin girls and leave Charlotte to take care of them. Ugh and don't get me started about the murder. Charlotte would hear some gossip and then call the police chief and I said "I heard this from so and so and you should look into it". I was surprised the police chief put up with her so much. This novel just didn't work for me and I won't be reading the rest of the series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Oh my God. Talk about "too stupid to live heroines", Charlotte Bessette is the epitome of the TSTL cozy mystery heroines. She's also extremely nosy and pushy and she's almost difficult to like or to feel sympathy toward. She bugs the chief of police in this small town - someone she grew up with - almost relentlessly. He's actually more sympathetic than her, because you can understand his frustration with her interference in the investigation, yet he tries to keep his patience (as much as possibl Oh my God. Talk about "too stupid to live heroines", Charlotte Bessette is the epitome of the TSTL cozy mystery heroines. She's also extremely nosy and pushy and she's almost difficult to like or to feel sympathy toward. She bugs the chief of police in this small town - someone she grew up with - almost relentlessly. He's actually more sympathetic than her, because you can understand his frustration with her interference in the investigation, yet he tries to keep his patience (as much as possible) and listen to her endless theories. That's another annoyance of this book - the endless and almost fantastical theories Charlotte keeps coming up with. Also, she thinks the police are too focused on her grandmother and not really investigating other possible suspects; but she is doing the same thing - trying to find evidence and fit theories to put the town's diva in the role as murderer. This sounded like it could be a cute series, but in actuality, the lead character is almost too awful to like. I'm not sure I can even stomach another.

  26. 4 out of 5

    annapi

    I really need to stay away from food-themed cozy mysteries. I haven't found one yet that was worth reading, and this one was as disappointing as the rest. It sounds so cute, mixing a cheese shop and murder. The recipes and the cheeses sound delicious. But the writing was just dull. Mostly telling instead of showing, and talking down to the reader, explaining things so obvious and not crediting the reader with enough intelligence to figure things out. I found the side characters more interesting t I really need to stay away from food-themed cozy mysteries. I haven't found one yet that was worth reading, and this one was as disappointing as the rest. It sounds so cute, mixing a cheese shop and murder. The recipes and the cheeses sound delicious. But the writing was just dull. Mostly telling instead of showing, and talking down to the reader, explaining things so obvious and not crediting the reader with enough intelligence to figure things out. I found the side characters more interesting than the protagonist, and I thought the attempt at a romance was lame. No spark between the love interests, despite what the main character said and thought. Way too many red herrings, all explained so painstakingly, and the book just went on for way too long so that it became boring. The police chief, while not a buffoon, was not convincing as a competent law enforcement officer. I was not even interested in trying to figure out whodunnit because I just could not care. It wasn't terrible, so I'll give it 2 stars.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    3.5* It took me a little while to get into the "vibe" of The Long Quiche Goodbye, as I've always had a fairly tenuous relationship with the "cosy mystery" sub-genre. On the negative side, I found a lot of the dialogue fairly clunky, the behaviour of the central characters frequently inexplicable and the constant product references laboured and distracting. The narrative featured a preponderence of telling, rather than showing plot and character details. I also felt that the book could have been m 3.5* It took me a little while to get into the "vibe" of The Long Quiche Goodbye, as I've always had a fairly tenuous relationship with the "cosy mystery" sub-genre. On the negative side, I found a lot of the dialogue fairly clunky, the behaviour of the central characters frequently inexplicable and the constant product references laboured and distracting. The narrative featured a preponderence of telling, rather than showing plot and character details. I also felt that the book could have been more tightly-edited to perhaps three-quarters of its actual length. That said, once I was into the spirit of it, The Long Quiche Goodbye was a rollicking tale of small-town relationships and jealousies, female solidarity and fabulous cheese platters. As an Australian, I'd always thought that American cheese was mostly limited to that appalling bright-orange plasticky stuff or the spray-on variety. It was intriguing to read of the variety of boutique and artisnal varieties the author describes as being produced in the environs of Providence, Ohio. I've done my usual book-stalking effort on Google Earth, and found the picturesque town of Grand Rapids, just across the Maumee river from the more diffuse community of Providence, a fitting representation of the book's setting. There are a couple of antique shops, several cafes and craft shops, a diner, an Italian restaurant and an ice-cream shop as Avery Aames describes, but no cheese and wine emporium - yet. By way of plot, the central strand is fairly simple - an unpopular local lethario and landlord Ed Woodhouse is murdered (with an olive-handled cheese knife) outside the gala opening of Charlotte Bessette's newly refurbished cheese shop and her cousin Matthew's adjoining wine shop and tasting room. Characteristically of the genre, motives abound, from Charlotte and Matthew, threatened with losing the lease on the shop they've recently put so much effort into updating, to Woodhouse's grasping widow Kristine, to any of a bevy of spurned former lovers, to a romantic rival of the deceased. However, it is Charlotte and Matthew's grandmother, Bernadette Bessette, co-founder of the cheese shop and current mayor of Providence, who is found leaning over Ed's body and clutching the knife, who is accused of the murder and placed on house arrest. Charlotte, aided by her gang of gal-pals, including her ex-Amish employee Rebecca, set out to clear Bernadette's name and fend off the increasingly outrageous efforts of Kristine Woodhouse to blacken her name, while conducting her own campaign to replace Bernadette as mayor. Meanwhile, Charlotte has a crush on local farmer and artisan cheesemaker Jordan Pace, but for a successful professional woman in her 30s is inexplicably hapless in her encounters with him. While I found the ultimate conclusion to the mystery a little underwhelming, the journey was enjoyable and light-hearted. The characters, particularly Charlotte and Rebecca, were well-developed, likeable and, engaging in their often ludicrous attempts to investigate the murder, bring plenty of humour to the narrative. One of the major highlights of the book for me, once I had become accustomed to the frequency of cheese references and wine product references, were the descriptions of the platters and displays Charlotte and Rebecca produce, and the family lunches and dinners Charlotte shares with her grandparents, nieces and cousins. I frequently found myself craving a slice of quiche or an appropriately-adorned slice of Stilton on artisnal bread. Recommended for those who enjoy gentle mysteries, female friendships and, of course, wine and cheese.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    3.5 stars This book was okay, but it seemed a little bogged down even from the start. There were so many characters and names and relationships throw at us so quickly that I had trouble keeping track. This is the first novel in the series, so I wish we could get to know the main characters more and then have other crazy characters added later. So many people who seemed to have different personalities at different points in the story made it confusing and hard to follow, which then made it less en 3.5 stars This book was okay, but it seemed a little bogged down even from the start. There were so many characters and names and relationships throw at us so quickly that I had trouble keeping track. This is the first novel in the series, so I wish we could get to know the main characters more and then have other crazy characters added later. So many people who seemed to have different personalities at different points in the story made it confusing and hard to follow, which then made it less enjoyable. When Charlotte's grandmother is accused of murdering Ed (a local enemy) in front of Charlotte's cheese shop, she knows she needs to investigate to find the real killer and clear her grandmother's name. Unfortunately, her grandmother is also trying to run for re-election as mayor, but is put on house arrest. This makes her depressed and frantic to keep herself in the public eye. It also makes Charlotte's job harder because she has to clear her name, run her cheese shop, take care of her nieces, and now keep an eye on her grandmother. This book mostly had her running around and the flow of the story jumped with her. I was totally surprised by the murderer, but that is not surprising since I could hardly keep all the people straight. I love the idea of a cheese shop with a wine annex. I love cheese and just reading about the different varieties made me hungry. I wish this book was a little lighter and easier to follow and I think I would have enjoyed it more. I really liked Charlotte and her family, but can't get a feel for her friends. Hopefully all the characters will be more developed in the future.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dayna Smith

    The fist book in the new Cheese Shop Mystery series. Charlotte runs her family's cheese shop. She has just partnered with her cousin to expand the business to include a wine shop connected with the cheese shop. She also has a crush on a local farmer and is hoping he will ask her for a date. At the opening of the new wine annex, a body is found outside her shop stabbed with one of her knives and her grandmother covered in blood near the body. When her grandmother is put on house arrest as the mur The fist book in the new Cheese Shop Mystery series. Charlotte runs her family's cheese shop. She has just partnered with her cousin to expand the business to include a wine shop connected with the cheese shop. She also has a crush on a local farmer and is hoping he will ask her for a date. At the opening of the new wine annex, a body is found outside her shop stabbed with one of her knives and her grandmother covered in blood near the body. When her grandmother is put on house arrest as the murder suspect, Charlotte sets out to prove her innocence, and still manage to get her date. A fun and enjoyable new cozy mystery series, complete with recipes

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Kern

    This is a cute, easy to read murder mystery. My biggest dislike is when the main character, who can run a successful business, turns into a ditzy detective, and starts inventing motives and clues. All these cozy books seem to do this and I sort of got my fill reading the Goldy Bear cooking/murder mystery series. Since this was #1, I will try to find more and put them aside for the holiday season.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.