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Since 1992, Border Crossings has showcased Henry Giroux's extraordinary range as a thinker by bringing together a series of essays that refigure the relationship between post-modernism, feminism, cultural studies and critical pedagogy. With discussions of topics including the struggle over academic canon, the role of popular culture in the curriculum and the cultural war t Since 1992, Border Crossings has showcased Henry Giroux's extraordinary range as a thinker by bringing together a series of essays that refigure the relationship between post-modernism, feminism, cultural studies and critical pedagogy. With discussions of topics including the struggle over academic canon, the role of popular culture in the curriculum and the cultural war the New Right has waged on schools, Giroux identified the most pressing issues facing critical educators at the turn of the century. In this revised edition, Giroux reflects on the limits and possibilities of border crossings in the 21st century. "Borders" in our post 9/11 world have not been collapsing, he argues, but vigorously rebuilt. In order to have a truly critically engaged citizenry the challenges of these new "borders"- such as the increased militarization of public spaces, the rise of neo-liberalism, and the war in Iraq- must play a vital role in any debate on school and pedagogy.


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Since 1992, Border Crossings has showcased Henry Giroux's extraordinary range as a thinker by bringing together a series of essays that refigure the relationship between post-modernism, feminism, cultural studies and critical pedagogy. With discussions of topics including the struggle over academic canon, the role of popular culture in the curriculum and the cultural war t Since 1992, Border Crossings has showcased Henry Giroux's extraordinary range as a thinker by bringing together a series of essays that refigure the relationship between post-modernism, feminism, cultural studies and critical pedagogy. With discussions of topics including the struggle over academic canon, the role of popular culture in the curriculum and the cultural war the New Right has waged on schools, Giroux identified the most pressing issues facing critical educators at the turn of the century. In this revised edition, Giroux reflects on the limits and possibilities of border crossings in the 21st century. "Borders" in our post 9/11 world have not been collapsing, he argues, but vigorously rebuilt. In order to have a truly critically engaged citizenry the challenges of these new "borders"- such as the increased militarization of public spaces, the rise of neo-liberalism, and the war in Iraq- must play a vital role in any debate on school and pedagogy.

30 review for Border Crossings: Cultural Workers and the Politics of Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Giroux begins Border Crossings with developing an exigence for the cultural work he proposes: citizenship is being reduced to consumerism, obsessions with the private are harming public life, and the war on terrorism is being waged as a war against dissent, immigrants, and democracy (2-4). Giroux proposes drawing on postcolonial theory in order to challenge and change politics and because it helps to question binary oppositions (13). He proposes a "border pedagogy" that recognizes margins, helps Giroux begins Border Crossings with developing an exigence for the cultural work he proposes: citizenship is being reduced to consumerism, obsessions with the private are harming public life, and the war on terrorism is being waged as a war against dissent, immigrants, and democracy (2-4). Giroux proposes drawing on postcolonial theory in order to challenge and change politics and because it helps to question binary oppositions (13). He proposes a "border pedagogy" that recognizes margins, helps students "to understand otherness in its own terms," and creates borderlands that helped to create new identities (20). Giroux understands pedagogy as both a demystification process and a process of student textual and cultural production (22). Giroux draws on the discourses of modernism (understanding a commitment to critical reason), postmodernism (challenging totalizing narratives and focusing on the local and contingent), and feminism (which questions margin and center and offers voice that links the personal and political) (66). Giroux's border pedagogy is important for anti-racist work, he argues, because it "offers students the opportunity to engage the multiple references that constitute different cultural codes, experiences, and languages" so that students are "media-literate in a world of changing representations" (108). Additionally, we need to understand that racism cannot simply be analyzed, but that narratives are taken up and deployed with "an investment of feeling, pleasure, and desire" (109). Giroux also draws on cultural studies, showing what it offers critical pedagogy: a focus on language, knowledge, and power that offers a "basis for creating new forms of knowledge" (140); an  understanding of culture as "contested terrain" (141); a complication of notions of difference and subjectivity within social groups (141); and an understanding of pedagogy as cultural production and not simply dissemination of knowledge (142). Giroux also argues that many radical educators have ignored the power of popular culture and the affective attachments to popular culture. For Giroux, pedagogy is not something that solely happens in school, but is cultural production (158). Popular culture needs to be understood as productive, "a site of struggle and possibility," and as "persuasive" (169). Popular culture persuades citizens for consent, through "investments in particular relations of meaning constructed through popular form" (170).  Susan Searls Giroux joins Henry Giroux in a later chapter arguing that one of critical pedagogy's goals should be to confront neoliberalism, the dominant ideology that divorces education from politics, reduces social relations to "supper and customer," fights the welfare state and public good, and limits public spheres (209-212).

  2. 4 out of 5

    W.T. Anderson

    Cross reference with Dewey, democracy & education Friere, pedagogy of oppressed Giroux, border crossings In exploring the theory pedagogy and practice of networked learning Cross reference with Dewey, democracy & education Friere, pedagogy of oppressed Giroux, border crossings In exploring the theory pedagogy and practice of networked learning

  3. 4 out of 5

    Arda

    Giroux is a rebel! Notes from thesis: The logic of institutions is that they are aligned with government, and as long as this is the case, the bodies intersecting in the spaces will remain complicit (Giroux, 2008) Giroux (2008) demonstrates the connection of space and agency in the following: “In a society in which the public sphere is characterized by a culture of fear and public life has receded behind gated communities, a pervasive discourse of privatization coupled with the practice of brutaliza Giroux is a rebel! Notes from thesis: The logic of institutions is that they are aligned with government, and as long as this is the case, the bodies intersecting in the spaces will remain complicit (Giroux, 2008) Giroux (2008) demonstrates the connection of space and agency in the following: “In a society in which the public sphere is characterized by a culture of fear and public life has receded behind gated communities, a pervasive discourse of privatization coupled with the practice of brutalization embraces an utterly narrow and commodified definition of freedom and feeds a disinterest in politics while closing down any sense of responsibility for those who in a neoliberal capitalist society represent the losers, the unemployed, the incarcerated, the poor, the young, and the elderly.” (p. 594-595) Understanding how pedagogies work is critical in acquiring the means to challenge and speak back to the authoritarian discourse (Arendt, 1976, 1977) – “from a position of critical agency” (Giroux, 2008, p. 611). Public pedagogy is set on and distributed in the public sphere of institutionalized sites such as, but not limited to, educational and cultural establishments as well as media platforms (Giroux, 2008). The Anglo and Euro centric discourse of academia, media, social media, various institutions working within the funding of governmental as well as non-governmental organizations and United Nations platforms, sets the defining relationships between the “developing” vs. “the developed.” The language, from that viewpoint, is within the “impoverished vocabulary of privatization, individualism, and excessive materialism” and it does not encourage critique or the type of collective action that would change the comfort zone by which governments are in the service of investors (Giroux, 2008, p. 592).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Vicente

    Greatbook. I used it for my dissertation, which was on the banning and values of Ethnic Studies programs in Arizona, Texas and California. Extremely insightful on today's education and its true purposes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    MacK

    In analyzing what it means to teach performance to children who often feel the need to perform for approval, attention, or just plain old entertainment, Giroux offers a number of valuable insights into not merely education in literature, theatre and film, but education in general. Though at times it's a little antagonistic for my tastes, it generally offers a host of ideas and encourages readers to make up their own minds. (Not at all a bad trait for any book about education)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dmitri

    Not your mother's educational theory... indeed, much more than ed theory. Plenty of great thinking here toward working out compromises between enlightenment and postmodern thought, and toward equipping and provoking intellectuals to bust out of their shells, cross borders, and kick butt.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    A bit of a poststructuralist view on society and the role of education within it. Advocates the benefits of individual identities without firm boundaries, identities that cross boundaries.

  8. 5 out of 5

    "Stars"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Micheal Rumore

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian J. Farester

  11. 5 out of 5

    İrfan Cenk Yay

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Rebello

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hennabyheather

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Parkison

  16. 4 out of 5

    ksam

  17. 4 out of 5

    Xochitl

  18. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  19. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen Brooks

  21. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  22. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robert Parkes

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ovunc

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carlos

  27. 4 out of 5

    Venus

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ernest Pujol león

  29. 5 out of 5

    Edward Davis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

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