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In their 2007 bestseller, Wikinomics Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams showed the world how mass collaboration was changing the way businesses communicate, create value, and compete in the new global marketplace. Now, in the wake of the global financial crisis, the principles of wikinomics have become more powerful than ever. Many of the institutions that have served us w In their 2007 bestseller, Wikinomics Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams showed the world how mass collaboration was changing the way businesses communicate, create value, and compete in the new global marketplace. Now, in the wake of the global financial crisis, the principles of wikinomics have become more powerful than ever. Many of the institutions that have served us well for decades or centuries seem stuck in the past and unable to move forward. And yet, in every corner of the globe, a powerful new model of economic and social innovation is sweeping across all sectors-one where people with drive, passion, and expertise take advantage of new Web-based tools to get more involved in making the world more prosperous, just, and sustainable. Tapscott and Williams show that in over a dozen fields-from finance to health care, science to education, the media to the environment-we have reached a historic turning point: cling to the old industrial-era paradigms or use collaborative innovation to revolutionize not only the way we work, but how we live, learn, create, govern, and care for one another. You'll meet innovators such as: * An Iraq veteran whose start-up car company is "staffed" by over 4,500 competing designers and supplied by microfactories around the world * A microlending community where 570,000 individuals help fund new ventures-from Angola to Vietnam * An online community for people with life-altering diseases that also serves as a large-scale research project * An astronomer who is mapping the universe with the help of 250,000 citizen scientists Tapscott and Williams once again use original research to provide vivid new examples of organizations that are successfully embracing the principles of wikinomics to change the world. Visit www.Macrowikinomics.com.


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In their 2007 bestseller, Wikinomics Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams showed the world how mass collaboration was changing the way businesses communicate, create value, and compete in the new global marketplace. Now, in the wake of the global financial crisis, the principles of wikinomics have become more powerful than ever. Many of the institutions that have served us w In their 2007 bestseller, Wikinomics Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams showed the world how mass collaboration was changing the way businesses communicate, create value, and compete in the new global marketplace. Now, in the wake of the global financial crisis, the principles of wikinomics have become more powerful than ever. Many of the institutions that have served us well for decades or centuries seem stuck in the past and unable to move forward. And yet, in every corner of the globe, a powerful new model of economic and social innovation is sweeping across all sectors-one where people with drive, passion, and expertise take advantage of new Web-based tools to get more involved in making the world more prosperous, just, and sustainable. Tapscott and Williams show that in over a dozen fields-from finance to health care, science to education, the media to the environment-we have reached a historic turning point: cling to the old industrial-era paradigms or use collaborative innovation to revolutionize not only the way we work, but how we live, learn, create, govern, and care for one another. You'll meet innovators such as: * An Iraq veteran whose start-up car company is "staffed" by over 4,500 competing designers and supplied by microfactories around the world * A microlending community where 570,000 individuals help fund new ventures-from Angola to Vietnam * An online community for people with life-altering diseases that also serves as a large-scale research project * An astronomer who is mapping the universe with the help of 250,000 citizen scientists Tapscott and Williams once again use original research to provide vivid new examples of organizations that are successfully embracing the principles of wikinomics to change the world. Visit www.Macrowikinomics.com.

30 review for Macrowikinomics: Rebooting Business and the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kara Babcock

    Full disclosure: I received this book in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. Loves me the free books. In Wikinomics, Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams argue that the Internet has irrevocably altered the way corporations and businesses will interact and develop new products and services. The proprietary, closed models of research and design are obsolete and must be replaced by mass collaboration with outside talent. Companies that do not embrace this new ethic of economics, the eponymous wikinomi Full disclosure: I received this book in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. Loves me the free books. In Wikinomics, Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams argue that the Internet has irrevocably altered the way corporations and businesses will interact and develop new products and services. The proprietary, closed models of research and design are obsolete and must be replaced by mass collaboration with outside talent. Companies that do not embrace this new ethic of economics, the eponymous wikinomics, will be left behind, their innovation too glacial for a world where news moves at the speed of the trending topics on Twitter. As I said in my review of Wikinomics, I am biased because of my generation. A lot of what Tapscott and Williams argue just feels right to me because this is how I have grown up using technology; I don't really understand any other model. My criticisms of Wikinomics were mostly directed toward the authors' style and rhetoric, and the same is true for Macrowikinomics. The books share the same effusive tone that makes me wince for how it must sound to the truly sceptical. However, this sequel has managed to win me over in a way the business-oriented Wikinomics did not. One thing I noticed with Wikinomics was how dated it felt, even though it was written only in 2006. In contrast, Macrowikinomics is a lot more topical and much more embedded within the current events of 2008-2010, yet it paradoxically feels like it will age more slowly. It owes this success to its expanded scope and more ambitious premises. By applying wikinomics in a more general setting, Tapscott and Williams make a more convincing case for its relevance. Macrowikinomics covers several topics of contemporary importance. The CBC Spark interview covers some of them with Tapscott. After introducing their concept and bringing those who did not read the first book up to speed, Tapscott and Williams briefly cover how they think wikinomics will help to avoid any repeats of the 2008 financial crisis (more open data means more watchdogs). However, the book really hits its stride in part III: "Reindustrializing the Planet." Here, Macrowikinomics does what Wikinomics didn't: it makes me angry. Oh, not angry at the book! No, Tapscott and Williams blithely discuss how wikinomics is beneficial for the transition away from fossil fuels, and although their conclusions and futuristic scenarios often err on the side of optimism, much of their analysis is valid. And so, the normally level-headed and mellow Ben feels the first signs of rage simmering beneath his placid surface. It's those darn global warming deniers! We know the effects of carbon dioxide emissions on the atmosphere. I am convinced by the evidence that humans are a significant contributor to global warming—however, even if one is not, doesn't it make sense to curb our emissions anyway? At some point, whether or not one agrees that we have already passed it, we'll be emitting too much carbon dioxide, and the Earth will not be a happy place to live. The same goes for our dependence on fossil fuels. Maybe the opponents of the transition to clean energy are right, and there are vast, untapped reserves of oil. That does not change the fact that oil is a finite, non-renewable resource; we are using it faster than it can be replenished by several oils of magnitude. Eventually we're going to have to kick our oil habit—isn't it better to do it now, while we can phase out oil gradually? Of course, the people who deny human culpability in global warming and the danger of our dependence on fossil fuels often do so out of a particularly insidious version of myopia. We humans are notoriously bad at our long-range planning, preferring to jump from crisis to crisis as our evolution has conditioned us to do. The result is a sort of "not in my lifetime" deferral of the problems of global warming, fossil fuel dependency, etc.—and this, of course, is where my generational bias rears its head. My generation rather worries we're the ones who will ultimately have to deal with these problems (or else)! Yet we are only just beginning to come of age and exert an influence on the conventional halls of power—corporations, governments, NGOs, etc. So understand that for us, the distributed approach to solving these problems that wikinomics champions feels natural and effective because it's largely all we have. Our governments mumble about "emissions targets" and "carbon taxes" even as our world leaders fly off on expensive jets to international summits where they talk about treaties that, if ever signed, are never really honoured. Our poor politicians are trapped between the rock of the powerful, well-funded corporate lobbyists and the increasingly-vocal youth calling out for change. Change, however, is slow in coming. And if our governments are slow in implementing clean energy, designing intelligent electrical grids, and subsidizing automobile innovation, then we are going to do it ourselves. Our methods are as various and diverse as our demographic: we might generate our own electricity and sell it back to the grid, we might help design vehicles that are more efficient, or maybe we'll develop and contribute to apps that track our carbon footprints. One of the more reassuring points that Tapscott and Williams make is that, contrary to how I sometimes feel, one does not have to be an expert in everything. Sometimes, with all of the issues that seem to be clamouring for my attention, I am just overwhelmed by the amount of information available to me. It's impossible to become an expert in everything, so I must rely on other experts to tell me what I should think, and that always opens me up to the danger of being misled—one Andrew Wakefield, and suddenly I'm running around, not vaccinating my children! Tapscott and Williams have a suggestion to help mitigate such problems: openness and participation. Just as they believe that being open about the methods for calculating derivatives and risks will prevent repeats of the 2008 financial crisis, they are very adamant about opening up R&D for transportation and encouraging innovation in the clean energy sector. I don't need to be an expert in car design, because there are plenty of other car design experts out there who can focus on helping to build better cars. Meanwhile, I can contribute where I feel most comfortable. And that brings me to Macrowikinomics' take on education. I am almost finished my undergraduate education. This was the last year of my honours bachelors degree in mathematics; next year I take "professional year" education courses and complete two sessions of student-teaching in schools. If all goes well, I'll be certified to teach grades 7-12 in Ontario, specifically in math and English. I've always wanted to be a teacher, even when I was a child. As I approach the attainment of that goal, I ruminate often on how I will teach. I have so many new options available to me, new technology and new strategies. As a new teacher, it threatens to be a little overwhelming, since I still have no experience. I'm sure I will find my way and develop strategies that work for me, as well as for my students. For now, I think about how I can bring my comfort and familiarity with current technology into the classroom and apply it to my teachables. If Macrowikinomics made me angry about global warming, it made me excited about education. Tapscott and Williams tackle mostly the "ivory tower" of universities in the first chapter of part VI: "Learning, Discovery, and Well-Being", but they also mention projects in elementary and secondary schools of which they approve. Many of their proposals are controversial, and many of them seem obvious, and there is plenty of overlap between these two categories. It should come as no surprise that they want pedagogy to shift away from one-to-many delivery methods, such as the traditional professorial lecture, toward collaborative learning environments where teachers guide students toward making discoveries. They quote Seymour Papert: "The scandal of education is that every time you teach something, you deprive a [student] of the pleasure and benefit of discovery." This resonates with me. As a student, I have always loved learning, and that has made it easier for me than many of my peers. I know that I can't make every student love learning, but I can do my best. I can recognize that everyone learns differently and try to foster that difference rather than ignore it as I deliver the same lesson in the same style to the same bored faces. Mostly, Macrowikinomics calls for a flexibility in the education system that would be as awesome as it is, at present, unattainable. Oh, I think components of their vision are very achievable—for example, I certainly hope to see open textbooks and additional platforms modelled after MIT's OpenCourseWare become more common. The success of OpenCourseWare and Khan Academy suggest that there is a niche traditional textbook and lecture-style learning is not satisfying. Some of Tapscott and Williams' suggestions are less likely to pass, at least in the near future: I think as long as universities are competing for government grants and corporate investments, it will be more difficult to collect credits from disparate institutions (through distance learning) and cobble them into a degree. Of course, Tapscott and Williams would like to see those institutions become collaborative at every level, not just when it comes to accreditation, and that would solve the problem—but the problem is a deep one, embedded with the very system itself. And I'm not going to tackle it myself … I'll be in high school, preparing the minds who probably will. In the last two parts of the book prior to the conclusion, Macrowikinomics turns first to the dying newspaper industry and then to the effect of wikinomics on freedom and democracy. The former contains little that will be new if one has been paying any sort of attention to the news in the past five years: newspapers are dying, free is killing them, bits are cheaper than atoms, etc. It is a solid enough analysis, but it is not the strongest part of the book. I am pleased by the inclusion of the latter part, because it addresses some of the concerns I voiced in my review of Wikinomics about the absence of any perspectives from less developed nations. Again, it's not perfect, and sometimes I had to flip to the end notes to find the caveats about how the Internet can be used to the advantage of authoritarian regimes as well as a tool to fight against them. I'm still pleased by the inclusion of these topics, however, and for readers less familiar with how social networking has interacted with political activism, this part will hopefully be enlightening. And yes, I get it: BMWs run Linux. The repetitive style that sometimes irked me in Wikinomics returns in all its glory. Also, if you have read Wikinomics, and especially if you read these in quick succession, some sections of this book will feel very familiar—in fact, some are reproduced verbatim from the first book. While I understand the need to familiarize newcomers with these ideas, and while it might be economical to save some time and effort by reusing older material, I found my attention wandering during these parts, because I had heard it all before. Tapscott and Williams are at their best when they are discussing the new and amazing opportunities for innovation that the Internet and mass collaboration offer. They are, in a sense, charting the new techniques made possible by our new technology, both by interviewing the people who are setting trends and blazing trails and by making their own diagnoses and suggestions for how we can innovate using wikinomics. As with the previous books, they run into more trouble when they attempt to wax philosophical—their enthusiasm undermines their frequent reminders that wikinomics, the Internet, etc., are not panaceas. Similarly, their attempts to refute criticism of wikinomics and macrowikinomics are noble but unimpressive. Macrowikinomics is thorough, well-researched, and very much a manifesto. Whether you consider this a good thing I will leave up to you. I, for one, plan to recommend this to people who I think will find it interesting, even if they might not agree with Tapscott and Williams' views. Unless you are an entrepreneur, investor, or corporate executive, I would advise you just to skip Wikinomics and go right to this book: it's everything Wikinomics is and more, and it's definitely worth reading. Macrowikinomics is neither the most insightful nor the most persuasive book about technology I've read, but it is provocative. It made me angry, and it made me inspired.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Supratim

    Review to come soon! :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    MsSmartiePants ...like the candy...

    So far, it's a fantasy tale about what is the future of the planet. Really? Can predict the future, huh? I am slogging through, hoping that the rose-colored glasses come off and they will provide some great insights. Hope I'm not disappointed. Disappointed......sooooo disappointed. Rambling on and on about what they believe the future could/should be, now that the internet is here and equalizing all of the citizens of the planet into a one world, green, clean, non-religious, non-discriminatory pl So far, it's a fantasy tale about what is the future of the planet. Really? Can predict the future, huh? I am slogging through, hoping that the rose-colored glasses come off and they will provide some great insights. Hope I'm not disappointed. Disappointed......sooooo disappointed. Rambling on and on about what they believe the future could/should be, now that the internet is here and equalizing all of the citizens of the planet into a one world, green, clean, non-religious, non-discriminatory place! Well, thank goodness! Too bad they didn't read the papers or even know the basics about humanity's propensity toward domination, control, violence and evil. Come on! Like the internet is going to change THAT! Big sigh. Unlike the first book, this book contains very little new information on emerging business, social or political advances. Where are the exciting and inspiring descriptions of real life applications and the positive changes they are bringing into everyday life? Unfortunately, they are replaced by the authors rosy and really narrow (and I have to say, arrogant) views of the glorious 'progressive' life we will all attain very soon. I had to quit reading it after I'd slogged through 3/4's. I really fought hard to give the authors a chance to turn from the boring and long diatribe, toward practical and applicable ideas now being implemented every second of every day. Don't bother with this one. You'd be better served re-reading the first issue from these authors.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Prescott

    Having heard a number of eye-opening interviews with Don Tapscott, I was utterly disappointed by this book. The subject matter is interesting and ultimately highly important, but struggles to shine beneath the stodgy language and over-explanations of the book's prose. Clearly, the audience of this book is the layman, who has been living in the 1950s since, well, the 1950s. For a tech-savvy, future-focused reader like myself, there was hardly anything I hadn't heard before. Strangely, while the b Having heard a number of eye-opening interviews with Don Tapscott, I was utterly disappointed by this book. The subject matter is interesting and ultimately highly important, but struggles to shine beneath the stodgy language and over-explanations of the book's prose. Clearly, the audience of this book is the layman, who has been living in the 1950s since, well, the 1950s. For a tech-savvy, future-focused reader like myself, there was hardly anything I hadn't heard before. Strangely, while the book highlights a number of anecdotes and case studies of companies and individuals who are pushing the accepted norms, I don't feel enough suggestions and action steps were presented. I could do without the broad predictions using phrases like "governments will" and "corporations must". Only in the conclusion are we shown an honest laundry list of how we can (and should change). I still have faith in this movement, and in the top-line notions discussed in the book. But I can't endorse this sterile, boring, tome. In the realm of pop economics and industry-based non-fiction, I'd suggest Chris Anderson, Alain de Botton, or Malcolm Gladwell.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cristina

    arguements are sound, examples are valid ... but i'm torn. this book seems too 'hopeful' - or i'm just jaded. right now it's a collection of good ideas (or ideals?) but i truly can't see the future this book envisions coming about any time soon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Harald Katzenschläger

    A must read when you want to know more about collaborative innovation

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dave Burns

    Just getting started.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luis Orozco

    I liked the ideasresented in the book, but having read it a number of years after its release, I find it somehow too optimistic and extremely repetitive.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tom Andrus

    This book made me glad to be alive at this time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    SVEN

    I read it in 2017 and that may have been 10 years too late for any of it to be insightful. The utopian vision of shared everything leading to prosperity has since been proven equally dangerous as attractive.

  11. 4 out of 5

    May Ling

    For whatever criticisms these authors might obtain, I do think this book is quite great as was their previously written effort in 2006. The world is changing and these two are screaming about it at the top of their lungs in a way that is quite thoughtful. (P. 68 and weaved throughout the book)Their example of Linux as a fully volunteer organization is quite well constructed. I am hoping to build on it in my writing efforts on the topic. (P. 368 Is online collaboration killing privacy) This is a r For whatever criticisms these authors might obtain, I do think this book is quite great as was their previously written effort in 2006. The world is changing and these two are screaming about it at the top of their lungs in a way that is quite thoughtful. (P. 68 and weaved throughout the book)Their example of Linux as a fully volunteer organization is quite well constructed. I am hoping to build on it in my writing efforts on the topic. (P. 368 Is online collaboration killing privacy) This is a real question that the new world will need to deal with. What actually matters as relates to private information.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Soundview Executive Book Summaries

    Macrowikinomics: Rebooting Business and the World by Don Tapscott was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2011. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: Macrowikinomics is a follow-up to the authors' 2006 breakthrough title Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything. Macrowikinomics is a natural successor to the ideas first explored in Wikinomics. If executives spent even a few moments with the original title, the sequel is a must-read. Wikinomics studied the Macrowikinomics: Rebooting Business and the World by Don Tapscott was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2011. THE SOUNDVIEW REVIEW: Macrowikinomics is a follow-up to the authors' 2006 breakthrough title Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything. Macrowikinomics is a natural successor to the ideas first explored in Wikinomics. If executives spent even a few moments with the original title, the sequel is a must-read. Wikinomics studied the way in which the digital world created a culture of mass collaboration. At the time of the first book’s publication, the boundaries of online collaboration were still establishing themselves. In the intervening years, the authors observed that mass collaboration shattered any attempt to classify it as existing solely in the domains of business or technology. As they point out, it’s become a “societal shift,” a cultural revolution that touches every aspect of life in and out of the workplace. Macrowikinomics picks up with this idea. The authors argue that the all-encompassing nature of mass collaboration present the globe with an opportunity to solve long-standing problems and restructure existing institutions. It’s an interesting idea that the authors explore in each section of Macrowikinomics. They apply their principles in an attempt to breathe life into problem areas such as climate change, education and health care. The argument that many of our troubled institutions are failing due to “command and control” leadership is intriguing, but the authors’ collaboration-based solutions may draw criticism from some readers. While they offer credible evidence to support a theory, such as their belief in regulatory bodies consisting of greater involvement from ordinary citizens, there will be a group of readers that will inevitably ask, “How do you make that happen?” It’s important for executives to make a distinction between each of the problems examined by Tapscott and Williams. Don’t think of it as an attempt to move one giant stone using the fulcrum the Internet and the lever of the online population. Think of it as an attempt to shift stones of various sizes. Some will move easily while others may require more effort to loosen them from the grip of the ways of the Industrial age. Any executive who reads Macrowikinomics is bound to find valuable food for thought that relates to his or her own company’s issues. The application of those ideas falls on the reader. Having noted that, the authors would be the first to point out that readers have the entire world at their disposal to help them along. Soundview's 8-page Executive Book Summary of Macrowikinomics is available here.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daria Steigman

    The world has changed, but has your business? The premise of Macrowikinomics: Rebooting Business and the World is that we need to embrace our interconnectedness and harness the power of technology and the social Web to tackle big problems and grow 21st-century businesses: Wikinomics has gone beyond a business or a technology trend to become a more encompassing societal shift… Wikinomics, defined as the art and science of mass collaboration in business, becomes macrowikinomics: the application of The world has changed, but has your business? The premise of Macrowikinomics: Rebooting Business and the World is that we need to embrace our interconnectedness and harness the power of technology and the social Web to tackle big problems and grow 21st-century businesses: Wikinomics has gone beyond a business or a technology trend to become a more encompassing societal shift… Wikinomics, defined as the art and science of mass collaboration in business, becomes macrowikinomics: the application of wikinomics and its core principles to society and all of its institutions. Authors Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams posit that successful organizations must embrace five principles to succeed in this new environment: collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity, and interdependence. They then explore how these principles are already being applied in a variety of sectors, including banking and finance, transportation, health care, education, media, and government. The value of Macrowikinomics isn’t just that Tapscott and Williams lay down markers for how to do this work. It’s that they provide numerous examples of organizations that are putting the power of collaboration and openness to work: --In response to the black box modeling and lack of transparency that brought the financial system to the brink of collapse in 2008, The Open Models Company has developed a collaborative online modeling platform to assess the value and soundness of various financial instruments. --Local Motors stands in stark contrast to the slow-to-move auto giants of the 20th century. It’s a crowdsouced online platform for custom designed and built automobiles. “You can think of Local Motors like a Dell for the auto industry,” write the authors, “ with its highly configurable direct sales model, low inventory, and active customer engagement.” --If you suffered from a rare disease, you would traditionally have had to rely on (1) identifying a really good doctor and (2) the data put out by pharmaceutical companies. With PatientsLikeMe, you can now tap into a community of people also are researching options, sharing information, and looking for answers. “What makes PatientsLikeMe effective,” write the authors, “is the way it aggregates the data from its members, both for the benefit of individual members and for scientific research.” Macrowikinomics isn’t a short book with pithy takeaways. It’s that rare business book that’s big, meaty, and worth pouring over. The authors point out that “small companies can have many of the same capabilities as large companies without the main liabilities—bureaucracy, legacy cultures, antiquated systems, and old ways of working… As more small firms exploit the Web for new resources, they can gain unprecedented access to global markets previously enjoyed by only the largest corporations.” Macrowikinomics is all about innovation, which is why I think it’s a must-read for entrepreneurs.

  14. 5 out of 5

    1.1

    Won this one. Thanks to the giveaways, being kind to me lately and all. This tome will get a second life as home defense tool or even better as part of a chair made entirely from books. Firstly, for everyone complaining about language and usage issues in this book, the generally dry (I wouldn't say stale, per se*) style and repetitiousness: it's a business book written by business people and all the jacket blurbs are from CEOs. So, really, there are characteristics of this book that shouldn't sur Won this one. Thanks to the giveaways, being kind to me lately and all. This tome will get a second life as home defense tool or even better as part of a chair made entirely from books. Firstly, for everyone complaining about language and usage issues in this book, the generally dry (I wouldn't say stale, per se*) style and repetitiousness: it's a business book written by business people and all the jacket blurbs are from CEOs. So, really, there are characteristics of this book that shouldn't surprise anybody. There are at least thirty sentences which commit the unthinkable sin of starting with 'Indeed, ...". Some issues are explored myopically, some are ignored, and some are frighteningly simplified in order to fit the wikinomics narrative. Ultimately I learned some few things by reading this book, it documents some important and interesting projects, and the writing was not inaccessible. I am accepting of dry writing, especially by writers are are not writers by trade or who have other limitations. Macrowikinomics is not a bad book, but reading it may require some leniency and patience. It is long, most of it is not riveting at all, but it's definitely acceptable and a good resource for anyone getting into the topic.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leonidas

    Summary: An intuitive thesis on the necessity for transparency, openness and collaboration for the quickly evolving internet-centric society. Using various real-world companies and organizations that have already employed the concepts. MacroWikinomics proposes a new frontier into developing a successful business, as well as, correcting many of humanities current lagging elements such as 3rd-world violence, pollution, and energy demand, among countless other examples. Review: Expand your perspecti Summary: An intuitive thesis on the necessity for transparency, openness and collaboration for the quickly evolving internet-centric society. Using various real-world companies and organizations that have already employed the concepts. MacroWikinomics proposes a new frontier into developing a successful business, as well as, correcting many of humanities current lagging elements such as 3rd-world violence, pollution, and energy demand, among countless other examples. Review: Expand your perspective on what the new socially-inventive collaboration between people is offering, and has potential to expand on. The limitations are endless, but the main strategy proposed is to develop a open-ended innovative platform for human-capital to develop ideas for you. For example, Apple has the App store, which allows external developers to feature their intuitive products. An interesting business proposal, with many, many opportunities. 5/5 Stars! Food for thought: Collaboration is the new business model. Let the intellectual capital of the outside world develop a product, that your company can feature. Let the outside world collaborate together on solving societal issues. Transparency, openness, collaboration.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Silas White

    This book comprehensively tackles an important subject. I understand some readers feel it's been expressed better elsewhere, such as in Wikinomics, but I had to skip to this one as Wikinomics seems a bit dated. I plan to go back to it now, though -- I expect to find some repetition. But there is also plenty of repetition and long-windedness *within* Macrowikinomics. I'm sure it easily could've been at least 100 pages lighter by cutting down on redundancy and repetition alone. The "it's all about This book comprehensively tackles an important subject. I understand some readers feel it's been expressed better elsewhere, such as in Wikinomics, but I had to skip to this one as Wikinomics seems a bit dated. I plan to go back to it now, though -- I expect to find some repetition. But there is also plenty of repetition and long-windedness *within* Macrowikinomics. I'm sure it easily could've been at least 100 pages lighter by cutting down on redundancy and repetition alone. The "it's all about collaboration and openness" refrain gets old quickly and one of the best sections was certainly near the end when the authors question the economic viability of "mass collaboration" having detrimental effects on employment as well as individual creativity. I found the book to be FULL of examples, to the contrary to other reviews posted on here. They do have a tendency to dwell on some examples, though, rather than provide even more (or just shorten the book!).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jari Pirhonen

    This is a great continuation to Wikinomics, which presented five principles for organizations and individuals to succeed in new, changed/changing world: collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity and interdependence. The authors present breathtaking variety of examples, where Wikinomics principles has been put in to the work. Examples include not only business world, but also efforts to help people, environment and the world. The book covers current challenges and possible future of financial s This is a great continuation to Wikinomics, which presented five principles for organizations and individuals to succeed in new, changed/changing world: collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity and interdependence. The authors present breathtaking variety of examples, where Wikinomics principles has been put in to the work. Examples include not only business world, but also efforts to help people, environment and the world. The book covers current challenges and possible future of financial services, transportation, science, media, governments, healthcare, climate change, etc. Especially great is that the authors are able to show real world success stories how companies and individuals has harnessed the power of Internet and collaboration. I recommend this book to anyone, who wants to be prepared in even more connected, faster, data-rich world, where old hierarachies are bypassed by colloborative efforts.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Miller

    I heard the author give a great 1-hour lecture on the topic at a conference... a better lecture than a full book. The concept is certainly very real - how collaborative innovation is changing the world. My issue was in an attempt to demonstrate how the approach is touching so many fields, the author never really probes thoughtfully into any one topic, leaving lots of unanswered questions. For example, in the chapter on government, he describes Obama using an open site to gather priorities for th I heard the author give a great 1-hour lecture on the topic at a conference... a better lecture than a full book. The concept is certainly very real - how collaborative innovation is changing the world. My issue was in an attempt to demonstrate how the approach is touching so many fields, the author never really probes thoughtfully into any one topic, leaving lots of unanswered questions. For example, in the chapter on government, he describes Obama using an open site to gather priorities for the country --- the winner was 'legalize marijuana!' The author just passes this off as .... "O well - sometimes these things yield meaningful results - sometimes not." I did find the healthcare part interesting - basically, you've got sites emerging where people with various conditions openly share their experiences and learn from each other. Makes great sense to me - trade privacy concerns for group wisdom. At the end off the day... not enough gems IMHO to recommend.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Richard Gombert

    This is an interesting book and well worth the read. Downsides: Authors are very, very repetitious. It reads like they wrote each chapter as a separate paper. In most of the chapters they spend a good few pages telling us the same thing over again (do they get paid by-the-word?). Authors do not practice what they preach. For a book about internet collaboration and the new global enterprise, the is a surprising lack of wiki, collaboration tools on the website. I'd at least expect to find a web pag This is an interesting book and well worth the read. Downsides: Authors are very, very repetitious. It reads like they wrote each chapter as a separate paper. In most of the chapters they spend a good few pages telling us the same thing over again (do they get paid by-the-word?). Authors do not practice what they preach. For a book about internet collaboration and the new global enterprise, the is a surprising lack of wiki, collaboration tools on the website. I'd at least expect to find a web page with links to the companies, projects and people profiled. Casual age discrimination through out the book. Upside: Informative and thought provoking. A must read for employees at every level.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sujata Sahni

    This is a time for Renewal and Transformation and not for Tinkering. This is not just a global financial crises but a crises for globalization. The old industrial models of education, media, healthcare, energy, finance and government that were broken are now getting a rebirth through fresh thinking and new approaches which represent a mixture of promise and peril. The new age of Networked Intelligence is killing the "plan and push" mentality. Organizations can succeed and even thrive in this new This is a time for Renewal and Transformation and not for Tinkering. This is not just a global financial crises but a crises for globalization. The old industrial models of education, media, healthcare, energy, finance and government that were broken are now getting a rebirth through fresh thinking and new approaches which represent a mixture of promise and peril. The new age of Networked Intelligence is killing the "plan and push" mentality. Organizations can succeed and even thrive in this new environment by embracing Collaboration, Openness, Sharing, Integrity and Interdependence. Social Innovation via Wikinomics will lead the development of new products, business models and governance.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Alan

    Part economic soothsaying, part state of the union for mass collaboration, Macrowikinomics is a reasonable overview of, and partial blueprint for, bringing the attributes of openness, transparency and participation to social and political structures. Although it addresses critics like Jaron Lanier (author of ‘You Are Not A Gadget: A Manifesto’), the book still does not offer much insight into the politics and pitfalls of large-scale open-source projects, something that may have tempered the extr Part economic soothsaying, part state of the union for mass collaboration, Macrowikinomics is a reasonable overview of, and partial blueprint for, bringing the attributes of openness, transparency and participation to social and political structures. Although it addresses critics like Jaron Lanier (author of ‘You Are Not A Gadget: A Manifesto’), the book still does not offer much insight into the politics and pitfalls of large-scale open-source projects, something that may have tempered the extremely optimistic — and yes, inspiring — view of our planet’s (possible) future.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    This book is less a look at the macro-economic effects of 'wikinomics' and more a work of futurism, contemplating how great life will be after everything embraces the concept. Reminds me of The Singularity Is Near in its pollyannish optimism. The Singularity, however, takes a much deeper and systematic approach to thinking about future events, while MacroWikinomics almost always provides the most simple, straightforward take on how macrowikinomics could solve each of the world's major problems.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Neelesh Marik

    This book easily falls in the category where the value you can derive from reading it is far, far higher than the cost of procuring it. Any leader in the digital age (or follower, for that matter) cannot afford to not read it. The five principles of macrowikinomics: collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity and interdependence are turning virtually every domain of human endeavor inside out. For a birds eye view visit macrowikinomics.com and watch this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfqwH This book easily falls in the category where the value you can derive from reading it is far, far higher than the cost of procuring it. Any leader in the digital age (or follower, for that matter) cannot afford to not read it. The five principles of macrowikinomics: collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity and interdependence are turning virtually every domain of human endeavor inside out. For a birds eye view visit macrowikinomics.com and watch this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfqwHT...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marcia

    This is a fascinating, erudite yet readable, book about the state of world economics. The authors give plenty of examples to explain complicated economic theories and practices. Basically, their premise is that the trickle-down theory previously applied to economics, religion, education, and other facets of culture does not work well today. The internet has opened the possibility of lateral information called "collaborative communities".

  25. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    Another good read. This 2010 book serves as a strong wake up call to all organisations to update the way they ought to work - i.e. to embrace the five principles of networked intelligence - collaboration, openness, sharing, integrity, and interdependence - and to reap rewards from social innovation. In particular, Tapscott and Williams dish out analysis/advice for key areas of green technology, education/learning, healthcare, media and government.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ivo Fernandes

    This book is like a continuation of the Wikinomics. Don Tapscott can really lose himself in dives into the future, in this book he presents the theory of how companies should default to open and to practices that enable collaboration with their customers, with their competitors, or even with the entire world, try to predict what the competitive advantages they will get for following this principles, and then show a large number of companies that are putting this theories into practice.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vincent

    This book isn't helpful to businessmen, either with its examples of its specific advice. It gives example of organizations working with people from the outside, and soliciting volunteers, but it doesn't explain how the companies exactly did that. I was expecting this book to be on par with other great business books like "Good to Great" and "Blue Ocean Strategy". I was utterly disappointed. I feel cheated on both time and money.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Fascinating read about wikinomics This is a long but fascinating read on the power of wikinomics and its impacts on modern society. I highly recommend this book for the modern leader to read and embrace. The world has changed, and will continue to change, and ignorance and avoidance are not the answer. Potentially, given the content of the book and he sometimes repetitive nature, you can either skip or skim sections. Overall, a great read and a great topic to explore.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I received a free copy of this book from the Goodreads First Reads program. Thank you to Don Tapscott and the First Reads for the opportunity to read this wonderful book. This was a great book about how innovation can be spurred through collaboration. I enjoyed the references to small business, as that is an important catalyst for innovation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eric Herr

    This is a fascinating look at how collaboration across cultures, geography, and disciplines is the tool that will propel innovation and industry. A little thick at times but a good read none the less. Social and Business Social applications are a key component to the success of this business model.

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