free hit counter code Rebekah - GoBooks - Download Free Book
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Rebekah

Availability: Ready to download

Born into a time and place where a woman speaks her mind at her peril, and reared as a motherless child by a doting father, Rebekah grew up to be a stunning, headstrong beauty. She was chosen by God for a special destiny. Rebekah leaves her father's house to marry Isaac, the studious young son of the Patriarch Abraham, only to find herself caught up in a series of painful r Born into a time and place where a woman speaks her mind at her peril, and reared as a motherless child by a doting father, Rebekah grew up to be a stunning, headstrong beauty. She was chosen by God for a special destiny. Rebekah leaves her father's house to marry Isaac, the studious young son of the Patriarch Abraham, only to find herself caught up in a series of painful rivalries, first between her husband and his brother Ishmael, and later between her sons Jacob and Esau. Her struggles to find her place in the family of Abraham are a true test of her faith, but through it all she finds her own relationship with God and does her best to serve His cause in the lives of those she loves. In Rebekah, Orson Scott Card has created an astonishing personality, complex and intriguing, and her story will engage your heart as it captures your imagination.


Compare
Ads Banner

Born into a time and place where a woman speaks her mind at her peril, and reared as a motherless child by a doting father, Rebekah grew up to be a stunning, headstrong beauty. She was chosen by God for a special destiny. Rebekah leaves her father's house to marry Isaac, the studious young son of the Patriarch Abraham, only to find herself caught up in a series of painful r Born into a time and place where a woman speaks her mind at her peril, and reared as a motherless child by a doting father, Rebekah grew up to be a stunning, headstrong beauty. She was chosen by God for a special destiny. Rebekah leaves her father's house to marry Isaac, the studious young son of the Patriarch Abraham, only to find herself caught up in a series of painful rivalries, first between her husband and his brother Ishmael, and later between her sons Jacob and Esau. Her struggles to find her place in the family of Abraham are a true test of her faith, but through it all she finds her own relationship with God and does her best to serve His cause in the lives of those she loves. In Rebekah, Orson Scott Card has created an astonishing personality, complex and intriguing, and her story will engage your heart as it captures your imagination.

30 review for Rebekah

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nola Redd

    When it comes to scriptures, we tend to endow the people in them with clear-cut shades of black or white. “Isaiah was a prophet, ergo he must be perfect.” That is why some of the humanizing stories from the Old Testament can be so confusing, the story of Isaac, Jacob, and Esau surely chief among them. Did Jacob really buy the birthright for a mess of pottage? And what’s up with the trickery involved in the actual blessing of the birthright? In Rebekah, Orson Scott Card writes an insightful story When it comes to scriptures, we tend to endow the people in them with clear-cut shades of black or white. “Isaiah was a prophet, ergo he must be perfect.” That is why some of the humanizing stories from the Old Testament can be so confusing, the story of Isaac, Jacob, and Esau surely chief among them. Did Jacob really buy the birthright for a mess of pottage? And what’s up with the trickery involved in the actual blessing of the birthright? In Rebekah, Orson Scott Card writes an insightful story that makes the reader nod and say, yes, that could happen. Rebekah is the story of the wife of Isaac and mother of Esau and Jacob (later known as Israel; guess that makes her the mother of Israel). The story begins with Rebekah’s childhood, telling a story of a girl who grows up without a mother and with a father made deaf by injury in the prime of his life. She lives also with her brother, Laban, who (in another book) tricks her son into marrying the wrong daughter. Although the story of her childhood is spun almost completely from Card’s imagination, he sets the stage for some of her later decisions. Not surprisingly, young Rebekah vows that she will never deceive anyone in her family, least of all her spouse, setting the stage for some irony. What I found most enjoyable about the novel, however, was the way it treated Isaac and Abraham. As Card tells it, Isaac is a righteous man who knows that his father chose God over him. Despite the fact that he agrees it was the right thing to do, he still lives with that decision. Furthermore, he knows that, because of him, Ishmael his brother was sent away. These two things have a serious effect on his relationship with his father, and he feels as though he can never measure up to the son that was lost – and Ishmael is the ideal “manly” son, compared to the quiet bookish shepherd. And so, when his sons are born, it is no surprise that Isaac strongly supports the manly man he wished he could have been, while spurning the son most like him. It sounds so trite as I write it, but Card manages to make these characters three-dimensional and realistic, so the reader finds themselves nodding and saying, “yes, I understand.” While Rebekah draws more from fiction than from fact, it is interesting to see the story that Card creates to explain what we have read. He did a wonderful job of researching the time period and the scriptural account, and I found nothing that seemed to be dramatically off-putting. Non-Latter-day Saints may struggle a bit with some of the details – for instance, with the fact that the prophet of God knew that the sun was one of many stars – but overall, I think they will enjoy it and find it based on much of what they know and believe. Another fantastic weave of fact and fiction by Card!

  2. 5 out of 5

    ☆Ruth☆

    Disappointing... definitely not of the same standard as his previous book 'Sarah'. I struggled to finish this one, I found most of the characters unlikeable and the style very introspective and maudlin; the language & behaviour of the protagonists is very modern, there is little action and I didn't feel much sense of the ancient world. Disappointing... definitely not of the same standard as his previous book 'Sarah'. I struggled to finish this one, I found most of the characters unlikeable and the style very introspective and maudlin; the language & behaviour of the protagonists is very modern, there is little action and I didn't feel much sense of the ancient world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rachel M

    Does anyone else find it interesting that Orson Scott Card wrote these three books about the women of Genesis after writing so many successful sci-fi novels? That was primarily the reason I picked this book up. I loved this interpretation of Rebekah, mostly because she is always so sure of herself and her convictions. She calls her parents out on things when they get it wrong, pointing to the ideals of their faith in the God of Abraham. She is filled with zeal,sure that everyone else must see i Does anyone else find it interesting that Orson Scott Card wrote these three books about the women of Genesis after writing so many successful sci-fi novels? That was primarily the reason I picked this book up. I loved this interpretation of Rebekah, mostly because she is always so sure of herself and her convictions. She calls her parents out on things when they get it wrong, pointing to the ideals of their faith in the God of Abraham. She is filled with zeal,sure that everyone else must see it exactly the same way she does, and if they don't, it is just a matter of time before she can convince them. And then - lo and behold - Rebekah herself fails...and learns that she, too, is prone to the same struggles as her parents, of trying to do the right thing and getting it wrong. I've always wondered a little, why the people of Genesis weren't more perfect - after all, God spoke directly to them! And yet Abraham doubted and ended up trying to get an heir the practical way instead of the way God had told him, and Sarah laughed when God told her she would have a baby, and Rebekah achieved Jacob's reception of the birthright through trickery. I have wondered why, if Jacob really was the right person to receive the birthright, Rebekah had to deceive her husband in order to do God's will. That doesn't seem like the story I would have picked out to show God's ways... And yet, Card shows that while these people were led by God, they were also incredibly woven into their natures and habits too. The Abrahahm in his story was cranky and headstrong, and Isaac doubted himself to the point of often being blind to how God wanted to work in him. Rebekah, while courageous and faithful, was filled with religious pride too. What I loved was seeing how, even in their faults, God was able to write a story that would point to Himself, and His faithulness, which I think Card showed well. I am especially glad I read the forward to the book, where the author explained that, now that he himself had grown children, he had come to recognize the ways that he had often done the wrong things even when he thought he was doing right, and how this theme greatly played into his envisioning of Rebekah. I thought he was incredibly humble to share this insight, which has probably been a comfort to many parents who have read the book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Get to know the women of the Bible. It is a historical fiction but leaves an impression on your heart. You will always remember the scripture story from now on because you feel like you personally know Rebekah.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    My husband got me 3 of the Women in Gen series for my birthday, and I am so glad he did. These are written as "fiction" but it is evident that there is a lot of research put into it as well. Card portrays an honest view of Jewish life far surpassing the vulgar cave-man "Red Tent" version. My copy of Rebekah has an endorsement from the Jerusalem Post on first page which says a lot about it's accuracy. Also commendable is the fact that Card does not alter the Genesis account. What he adds gives de My husband got me 3 of the Women in Gen series for my birthday, and I am so glad he did. These are written as "fiction" but it is evident that there is a lot of research put into it as well. Card portrays an honest view of Jewish life far surpassing the vulgar cave-man "Red Tent" version. My copy of Rebekah has an endorsement from the Jerusalem Post on first page which says a lot about it's accuracy. Also commendable is the fact that Card does not alter the Genesis account. What he adds gives deeper meaning and a higher understanding of what is already in the scriptures. There are hints that some of Rebekah was loosely taken from other ancient texts as well. As an example; Jasher 24: 39 ... and they gave him Rebecca, the daughter of Bethuel, for a wife for Isaac. 40 And the young woman was of very comely appearance, she was a virgin, and Rebecca was ten years old in those days. Early on in the Book Card mentions Rebekah being 10 years old, and makes a point that she was very mature for her age. Her age is mentioned in such a way that most readers will not realize how young she was when married though. Card also mentions the book of Noah in reference to another account of the flood - and the Book of Noah does actually exist, you can buy it on Amazon, usually in combination with the works of Enoch. He also discretely brings up the Israelite Goddess Asherah, AKA, Heavenly Mother. If you don't mind, I would like to provide some additional background on Asherah to anyone interested in reading this, or any other books related to Jewish histories. The existence of a Heavenly Mother is not just Mormon doctrine - although I do not want to misrepresent the LDS either, they do not worship Her, they only admit to Her existence. In Genesis 21:33 Abraham planted a tamarisk tree (tree of life representing feminine child bearing ability) and called there on the name of Yahweh el Olam (a combination of two divine names). In Genesis 30:13 Leah names her son Ahser whose names means "with Asherah's help". Perhaps the most beautiful description of Asherah in the Bible is the Proverbs 3:13-18 inclusio (happy, wisdom, and tree of life are all "discrete" translations of the Hebrew words Ashre, chokmah, and ets chayyum). Asherah is very much a part of the Old Testament. Just as Abraham sacrificing Isaac represents Heavenly father sacrificing Jesus, I strongly suspect Sarah, Abraham's beautiful wife, represents Asherah. The many righteous barren women combined with the polygamy throughout the OT possibly symbolic of Mary, not Asherah, becoming the mother of Their "only" begotten son. The background of the ever so important baptism as being an actual "birth"... a birth respecting the free agency of the "children" in which divine Parents are chosen rather than forced upon a spirit through a physical birth... Also adding to the reason that Jesus was baptized, not to take away sin, or to become a child of Heavenly Father... the words "This is my beloved son" perhaps being spoken by a female voice after Jesus' baptism. Of course inappropriate worship of the beautiful Asherah lead to Her presence being hidden, the commandment of not worshipping images. Ex 19: 4 Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above - this commandment does not come about until Ex, so Abraham and others are perhaps not really doing something that was wrong at the time although the idea of men protecting and respecting the sanctity of womanhood was in place starting with Adam. Card points out the fact that the Jewish people do not dare utter the name of Heavenly Father and protect Asherah even more vehemently. The great sin of inappropriately worshiping Her much worse than using the Lord's name in vain. (I know the account surrounding Rebekah's mother is fictional, but the points made by the story are very real). If Orson happens across my ramblings, I apologize for over analyzing your fictional work. Perhaps I read too much into it, or combine it with things I should not... or perhaps I am right, and just not as discreet at introducing some subjects as Card is... In any event, Rebekah is a beautiful read, perhaps I misrepresent it, I do not think it is meant to be a scholarly research paper, it reads like a best-seller novel, although to those who have read some other things, there are elements in it that are much deeper than perhaps the uneducated reader might grasp - which is what makes all of Card's books so intriguing. Disturbing how accurately Card, a male, is able to portray all that is female. Beautiful that he is able to reveal the real power women had and still have to those who do not yet understand the nobility of being a mother and wife. I will pass this book along to others not only as a testimony builder that brings the scriptures to life, but also as a book that reveals the beauty of male and female roles and the appropriate honest way people from "Mars and Venus" can come to respect and support one another. My deepest thanks to Bro. Card for all of his work.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Guzman

    I gave this one a 3 1/2 stars. I love stories of the bible told in a novel. This one was good, not great. I really wanted to like it better than I did. The story of Rebekah, wife to Isaac (son of Abraham). I would have liked to hear more of the culture of the times to give me more of a feel of the times. Not so much. The one thing I didn't care for was the author had the characters talk in a modern way and didn't give me a sense of the times. Anyway I might read another book by this author on bib I gave this one a 3 1/2 stars. I love stories of the bible told in a novel. This one was good, not great. I really wanted to like it better than I did. The story of Rebekah, wife to Isaac (son of Abraham). I would have liked to hear more of the culture of the times to give me more of a feel of the times. Not so much. The one thing I didn't care for was the author had the characters talk in a modern way and didn't give me a sense of the times. Anyway I might read another book by this author on biblical stories.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    This novel by Orson Scott Card about the life of the matriarch Rebekah, is at once moving and engaging. Unlike some novels, such as Sarah by Marek Halter and The Red Tent, by Anita Diamant, where the women are portayed as worshiping idols and other gods, she is shown as a strong women, devoted to the service of Yahweh since she was little, as are the other matriarchs in the Women of Genesis series. Card has done a great job of filling in the gaps and bringing the women of the Bible to life. The dig This novel by Orson Scott Card about the life of the matriarch Rebekah, is at once moving and engaging. Unlike some novels, such as Sarah by Marek Halter and The Red Tent, by Anita Diamant, where the women are portayed as worshiping idols and other gods, she is shown as a strong women, devoted to the service of Yahweh since she was little, as are the other matriarchs in the Women of Genesis series. Card has done a great job of filling in the gaps and bringing the women of the Bible to life. The digressions from the Biblical account are not major and are, I believe, in the overall spirit of the Biblical account. As a believing Jew, I did not find anything incongruent or objectionable in this book, although it is written by a Mormon. Rebekah loses her mother as a baby, and is brought up under by a doting father, by her simple-minded and devoted nurse Deborah. She is also close to her brother Laban. Her beauty is renowned and she has a headstrong and powerful personality temprered by an innate compassion.When she is seven years old an accident renders her father, Bethuel, deaf. She rejects marriage to a wealthy nobleman Ezbaal, because he worships pagan gods, and not Yahweh, and is by a strange series of events reunited with her mother Akyas, who was sent by Bethuel shortly after Rebekah's birth. Later she knows, through G-D, when Eliezer meets her at the well, that it is her destiny to go with him and marry Isaac, and go's with Isaac to dwell at the home of his father Abraham at Kirjath-arba. The love between Rebekah and Isaac is great but it is strained by the rivalry with his brother Ishmail, and the domineering nature of Isaac's father,. Abraham. She falls pregnant after twenty years, and in a dream is visited by her great ancestors Seth, the son of Noah, and Eber, and several others of whom she knew less. They inform her she will give birth to twins " You have two great men inside you, two mighty nations, two ways of life, and the one will be stronger than the other, and the elder will serve the younger". Not long after the twins Jacob and Esau are born, their different natures become apparent. Jacob is good natured and obedient, while Esau is wild and wilfful. Rebekah favours Jacob and Isaac favours Esau. Esau hunts and kills the animals, while Jacob tends and loves them. A powerful anecdote is related to show their different natures, when they are five years old and and Jacob weeps because Esau throws stones at a puppy until it is blinded. They grow up and finally Esau shows his true waywardness, bloodthirsty caharacter and his disinterest in the word of G-D, and he marries two Hittite women. The book draws to a close with the famous events where Esau sells his birthrigh to Jacob for a mess of pottage, and where Jacob tricks Isaac into giving him the birthright instead of Esau. But according to the author's interpretation, Isaac really knows it is Jacob, but G-D tels him that indeed Jacob is worthy of the blessing. The dialogues show the conflicts prevalent in the narrative. It is written in modern language, and should bring the narratives alive to the readers. I look forward to reading the other Women of Genesis novels.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gayle

    I have liked Orson Scott Card's other books on women of the Bible but was disappointed in this one for I was very uncomfortable about the way he portrayed Rebekah and her family and mostly with the image that was depicted of Abraham and Isaac. This is not the way I want to think of them. It is an interesting and well written book, but my opinions seem to be different than the author. I know that we have to remember that this is fiction written about real people who we don't have very much detail I have liked Orson Scott Card's other books on women of the Bible but was disappointed in this one for I was very uncomfortable about the way he portrayed Rebekah and her family and mostly with the image that was depicted of Abraham and Isaac. This is not the way I want to think of them. It is an interesting and well written book, but my opinions seem to be different than the author. I know that we have to remember that this is fiction written about real people who we don't have very much detail about, but still this was the author's own interpretation of people we know very little about.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elar

    It was same as first book in series - same dilemmas, same problems and similar solutions. And clearly I am not the audience :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daciana Washburn

    I couldn’t decide between a 3 and 4 stars - so maybe 3.5 ⭐️ would be closer to how I really feel. There were parts I really liked and things about the characters that really frustrated me. But over all I really enjoyed getting a new perspective of Rebekah

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Sampson

    As with Card's other biblical fiction, Rebekah tells the familiar story in a very real way. Card's strength is with his characters, with the very real and very familiar struggles they face that make them entirely real people. So many things that seem black and white in the Bible story—parental favouritism by both Isaac and Rebekah, numerous layers of deception, and so on—are put in the light of humans struggling with what they believe to be right and what they believe to be God's will. Biblical f As with Card's other biblical fiction, Rebekah tells the familiar story in a very real way. Card's strength is with his characters, with the very real and very familiar struggles they face that make them entirely real people. So many things that seem black and white in the Bible story—parental favouritism by both Isaac and Rebekah, numerous layers of deception, and so on—are put in the light of humans struggling with what they believe to be right and what they believe to be God's will. Biblical fiction is just that—fiction based on the Bible. I know much of this book is made up. But Card writes these people so beautifully that I could wish it were not so.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Eh. It was not the lack of swash-buckling, swordplay, magic, Austen-worthy wit or romance that left me unimpressed, it was the bleakness and constant fretting of the characters. Isaac was weak and self-doubting. Rebekah was a whiner. Abraham was a manipulator. All they did was argue. (Har! Where were the pirates?) The jarring switch between third and first-person narration made me dizzy. And good heavens, what does one expect from a Bible story, other than bleakness? In all fairness, Card did po Eh. It was not the lack of swash-buckling, swordplay, magic, Austen-worthy wit or romance that left me unimpressed, it was the bleakness and constant fretting of the characters. Isaac was weak and self-doubting. Rebekah was a whiner. Abraham was a manipulator. All they did was argue. (Har! Where were the pirates?) The jarring switch between third and first-person narration made me dizzy. And good heavens, what does one expect from a Bible story, other than bleakness? In all fairness, Card did portray the relationships between the characters believably, and his representation of their faith was inspiring. However, I think I'll try the Ender's series to partake of his literary prowess.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Liked it, but not so much as Sarah. It's likely because there's so much information in the Bible about Sarah I felt Card was just filling in the blanks, rather than inventing the story. Rebecca is less-mentioned in scripture, so Card had to take more liberties creating her character, which made it a little less compelling to me, although still interesting. I did really like some of his insights on listening to the Spirit, and how impressions come.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I love the Women of Genesis books and can't wait for the next one. I love historical fiction about scriptural people, particularly women because they are so rarely mentioned in the scriptures at all. Anyone who can help me to better understand or relate to women in the scriptures rocks. Also amazing that these books are written by a male author.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I really liked the beginning of the book about Rebekah's childhood and how she married Isaac, but then I did not like how Card portrayed Isaac and Abraham and especially their relationship with each other. I ended up disliking both of them very much, which is terrible way to feel about these wonderful Old Testament prophets.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I really enjoyed this book. I started reading it while in Georgia visiting my SIL and had to hurry and request it from the library when we got back. I'm a sucker for romance and thought that Rebekah and Isaac were so beautifully written. I thought that Card did really well in describing events and the human side of them.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    This book was interesting, but it's hard to read fiction based on something that I only know about from the Bible. It was very different from what I expected and it made me think about that whole story a little differently. 6/14/2007

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kim Davison

    Of all the Women of Genesis books, I enjoyed this one the most. I liked the development of Rebekah's character. An inspiring read if you can get past ancient personalities acting in ways more appropriate for modern people.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Smith

    Loved this book. Best one I've read in a while. I read this one before Sarah so I guess we'll see how much I like Sarah if it really is repetitive. It felt good to read a book that could keep me up at night.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alisha

    I really enjoyed Orson Scott Card's Women of Genesis series even though I totally read them out of order. I loved how the women came to life and each had unique yet strong personalities. I really hope writes a fourth book in the series!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    It was too jarring to have the characters speak in contemporary language. I didn't buy it and I never got into the story because of it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pokeyann

    Once again loved this installment in the series, I really like the humanistic quality put into these eternal stories.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Intriguing fictional look at women from the scriptures. If you try not to think of her as the same Rebekah, it is a beautiful story!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    Great fictional story around the life of Rebekah. Orson Scott Card did a great job and I couldn't put it down.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I know it's very fictionalized but I really enjoyed this story of Rebekah from the Old Testament.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

    I thought his portrayal of Isaac was SO insightful and unique. This is my favorite thus far of the Women of Genesis series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This book was my favorite out of the Women of Genesis series. I wish I had the misfortune of needing to wear a veil over my face. :)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Orson Scott Card does a great job with Rebekah's story, though he ends on what is probably an overly optimistic note.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ronni Jo

    Not as great as I'd hoped, but I have very high expectations for Card. I enjoyed it, but I thought there could have been more character development and maybe, I don't know, less whining?

  30. 5 out of 5

    StoryStormBlog

    ~4.5 stars. “Rebekah” by Orson Scott Card is a superb example of how to use inner conflict to make even a slower, character-driven story riveting. Each of the main characters was sympathetic—at least, those who were meant to be. As in “Sarah,” the first in this series, Card still excels in his use of dialogue, but in this second novel—unlike the first—I had only the praise and none of the scriptural reservations. It’s true that Card interprets the repeated sister-wife narratives the same way as s ~4.5 stars. “Rebekah” by Orson Scott Card is a superb example of how to use inner conflict to make even a slower, character-driven story riveting. Each of the main characters was sympathetic—at least, those who were meant to be. As in “Sarah,” the first in this series, Card still excels in his use of dialogue, but in this second novel—unlike the first—I had only the praise and none of the scriptural reservations. It’s true that Card interprets the repeated sister-wife narratives the same way as some literary critics do: Card assumes a singular event, which he already included in “Sarah,” so readers won’t find another here. A few liberties don’t concern me so long as the spirit of the Scripture remains intact—which I believe it did in this second novel. The Jacob painted in this story is compelling and lovable enough I’m curious to read the next book in the series to see how Card paints the rest of Jacob’s story. I will say—though it doesn’t bother me—Card’s style in this series seems to be to add in—for lack of a better word—“diversions” from the Scripture. These diversions don’t contradict the biblical account. Readers can imagine these “diversion” are events that never got recorded. In “Rebekah,” these story threads are all plausible and interesting, even enhancing characterization. I enjoyed the additions in this book, though if you’re looking for something that adheres only to the biblical account, with no diversions or embellishments, this might not suit. Personally, I thought it was a well-written and interesting story that explains some of the questions that rise in my mind when I read the biblical account… like, for example, why Isaac didn’t revoke the blessing he’d given to Jacob in error. Furthermore, why bless him again, more intentionally, after Isaac became aware of his son’s deception? This novel provides plausible answers, as well as familial themes that will likely provoke deeper thinking of just what the original account means. As Card writes, inherited behaviors… “would show up in the way each treated his children. And so on, and so on, in a never-ending cycle that began with nothing worse than good people trying to do what was right and getting it wrong without meaning to.” And indeed Jacob errs in the same way as his father. Just as Isaac favored Esau, reaping rivalry between sons, so too Jacob’s favoritism reaps discord.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.