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The Path of a Christian Witch

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A unique mix of memoir and how-to that includes practical daily Pagan rituals, this inspiring book shows how one woman blended Christian traditions with the magic and beauty of a Wiccan practice. Raised in the Catholic faith, yet strongly drawn to Paganism, Adelina St. Clair spent many years questioning and soul-searching before she found a way to blend aspects of Wicca and A unique mix of memoir and how-to that includes practical daily Pagan rituals, this inspiring book shows how one woman blended Christian traditions with the magic and beauty of a Wiccan practice. Raised in the Catholic faith, yet strongly drawn to Paganism, Adelina St. Clair spent many years questioning and soul-searching before she found a way to blend aspects of Wicca and Christianity into a vibrant and loving belief system. Filled with personal anecdotes, this book tells the story of St. Clair's journey of self-discovery and revelation, from her initial fear and guilt to her ultimate sense of peace and joy. With warmth and heartfelt reverence, St. Clair discusses vital aspects of Witchcraft and Christianity, as well as the commonalities between the two. Monotheism vs. polytheism Magical practice The teachings of Christ Goddess worship The femininity of God The Wheel of the Year Praying the rosary Sacred space


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A unique mix of memoir and how-to that includes practical daily Pagan rituals, this inspiring book shows how one woman blended Christian traditions with the magic and beauty of a Wiccan practice. Raised in the Catholic faith, yet strongly drawn to Paganism, Adelina St. Clair spent many years questioning and soul-searching before she found a way to blend aspects of Wicca and A unique mix of memoir and how-to that includes practical daily Pagan rituals, this inspiring book shows how one woman blended Christian traditions with the magic and beauty of a Wiccan practice. Raised in the Catholic faith, yet strongly drawn to Paganism, Adelina St. Clair spent many years questioning and soul-searching before she found a way to blend aspects of Wicca and Christianity into a vibrant and loving belief system. Filled with personal anecdotes, this book tells the story of St. Clair's journey of self-discovery and revelation, from her initial fear and guilt to her ultimate sense of peace and joy. With warmth and heartfelt reverence, St. Clair discusses vital aspects of Witchcraft and Christianity, as well as the commonalities between the two. Monotheism vs. polytheism Magical practice The teachings of Christ Goddess worship The femininity of God The Wheel of the Year Praying the rosary Sacred space

30 review for The Path of a Christian Witch

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lee Harmon

    Joyce called me to the center of the circle. I walked up to her, my heart pounding in my chest. Our eyes locked. She said, “Adelina, have you chosen your deity pair?” I answered, “I have.” She continued, “Who have you chosen?” I took a deep breath, bathed in the energy of this holy gathering and stated for all to hear, “Jesus of Nazareth and Mary of Magdala.” If you’re reading this from a Christian perspective, may I make a suggestion about how to approach this book? Don’t read critically. Suspen Joyce called me to the center of the circle. I walked up to her, my heart pounding in my chest. Our eyes locked. She said, “Adelina, have you chosen your deity pair?” I answered, “I have.” She continued, “Who have you chosen?” I took a deep breath, bathed in the energy of this holy gathering and stated for all to hear, “Jesus of Nazareth and Mary of Magdala.” If you’re reading this from a Christian perspective, may I make a suggestion about how to approach this book? Don’t read critically. Suspend disbelief, set aside your arguments, and enjoy the journey of this Christian-turned-Witch-turned-ChristianWitch as if reading a fantasy novel. As you approach the end of the book, gradually let it sink in that you’ve been reading a biography, the life-journey of a real person. I know little about the Wiccan religion, but my take on the book is this: Adelina St. Clair, the book’s author, discovered two basic truths in life. Christianity is real. Wiccan magic and practice is real. Both are good, both are healthy, Adelina needed the connection both to Christ and to nature’s rhythms, but the two religions are oil and water. Christians teach that witchcraft is evil, and Wiccans are polytheistic in practice. So what did Adelina do? She embraced Wiccan truths, but chose as a patron deity the Christian God and His pantheon (Jesus, Mary, the saints, the patriarchs, the angels). God is Love, writes John the Apostle. As a witch, Adelina agrees, saying “I believe in love, always and above all,” and hopes for a “new community of people, who will cultivate their light in a new-old way and spread a new wave of love into the world.” She turned to me briefly, let out a sigh, and said, “The answer is to love.” And she went on her way. There was something special about the way my angel told me the greatest secret of my life. She did not take on airs of mystery or make dramatic pauses to emphasize the importance of the message. Her attitude seemed to say, “There. You have it. Why are you so intent on finding something else? That’s all there is.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Silke

    First of all for you need to see this book in its right setting. Especially for West European readers like myself. In Canada and the united states Christianity is still a big thing. Whole communities are built around a church and at times I thought “really, are you serious about this?” But that is when I learned I had to put it a little bit in perspective. Here the churches are running empty and we don’t really follow the guidelines in the bible anymore. This book caught my attention because I my First of all for you need to see this book in its right setting. Especially for West European readers like myself. In Canada and the united states Christianity is still a big thing. Whole communities are built around a church and at times I thought “really, are you serious about this?” But that is when I learned I had to put it a little bit in perspective. Here the churches are running empty and we don’t really follow the guidelines in the bible anymore. This book caught my attention because I myself are still trying to find a way to mix my pagan ways with my catholic upbringing. The book made reflect on my own path and my own spiritual journeys. She was even able to set a light on some of the problems I have been encountering. I especially loved the way she found a bridge between two religions that at first seem so different. Why only 3 starts then? Because this book was mend to be a memoir of a woman finding her path. And in sorts it was, but it was too vague and not all to personal. We learn little of the author herself. She spends lots of time describing rituals and how she replaces the names of the gods by Christian names. And that is all well, but if I were looking for a description of rituals I would read another book. Much better literature about that subject out there.

  3. 4 out of 5

    druidessprincess

    This book spoke to me. So deeply. So powerfully. I don't really have words right now. Just...all the feels. Beautiful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gaile

    The author began in confusion over her christian faith and her interest in the feminine side of religion. During the course of this book, she manages to merge the two into a faith she can live with. She had a Roman Catholic upbringing. I too of that church but early Christianity had to work with the pagan beliefs of the common people who were very stubborn in letting go of them. Much of the rituals and practices of Catholicism have evolved out of the pagan religions. Much has also been lost. Find The author began in confusion over her christian faith and her interest in the feminine side of religion. During the course of this book, she manages to merge the two into a faith she can live with. She had a Roman Catholic upbringing. I too of that church but early Christianity had to work with the pagan beliefs of the common people who were very stubborn in letting go of them. Much of the rituals and practices of Catholicism have evolved out of the pagan religions. Much has also been lost. Finding her way through this maze is the root of her story. I found this book to be very inspiring, very uplifting and fascinating. It really absorbed my attention. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kar Schmidt Holloway

    In general a sweet and lovely book to read. In parts I was definitely uncomfortable with the culturally appropriative and inaccurate comments regarding Indigenous religions and closed cultures and it was definitely not okay to use the g-slur. The ignorant comments about cultures outside her own was troublesome, but I have to say that those things aren't a huge part of the book. I'm really conflicted about this rating because the non-problematic parts of the book really are very very good.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Pearl

    The Path of a Christian Witch is is a beautifully written account of one person's struggle to balance the faith she was born into and loved with a new found relationship with the Divine feminine. I really related to this book, being brought up Christian myself, and found a lot of comfort knowing that other people had gone through the same struggles. This book is an important work about spiritual tolerance. People of all religions spend so much time judging one another, and a person blending two The Path of a Christian Witch is is a beautifully written account of one person's struggle to balance the faith she was born into and loved with a new found relationship with the Divine feminine. I really related to this book, being brought up Christian myself, and found a lot of comfort knowing that other people had gone through the same struggles. This book is an important work about spiritual tolerance. People of all religions spend so much time judging one another, and a person blending two faiths gets it from both sides. "You cannot be a Christian and practice witchcraft! That's of the Devil!" "You worship Jesus? What a fluffy bunny." "Real Christians would never believe in a Goddess." "Don't worry, once you get more experience you'll drop that Christian phase." Instead of tearing people down, why not see the common ground we share? There are many paths to God, and just because another chooses to diverge from yours does not mean their path will not reach the Divine. Allow others to walk the path they were meant to walk, and be fulfilled all the more from yours. Let go of your fear, and love. For My law is love is unto all beings...Let My worship be in the heart that rejoices, for behold, all acts of love and pleasure are My rituals. Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in paganism or witchcraft but still feels a connection to their Christian roots or to any Christian or Pagan who wants to understand how someone could blend the two faiths together. If you approach this book with an open mind, I think you'll be surprised just how much it can teach you about your own faith and the many faces of God.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carola

    I really enjoyed reading this book. It's part memoir and part "how-to". Being someone who grew up Catholic, it gave me a lot to think about. All along I felt that the church (at least the ones I went to) only preached fear and used that to bully people into doing what they wanted. This is why I follow the Wiccan path. I loved the authors journey, but a little different than mine. I feel a pull and connection to elemental beings, the fairy folk, and mystical beings, so I don't think the Christian I really enjoyed reading this book. It's part memoir and part "how-to". Being someone who grew up Catholic, it gave me a lot to think about. All along I felt that the church (at least the ones I went to) only preached fear and used that to bully people into doing what they wanted. This is why I follow the Wiccan path. I loved the authors journey, but a little different than mine. I feel a pull and connection to elemental beings, the fairy folk, and mystical beings, so I don't think the Christian Witch path is 100% for me. I do, however, enjoy reading and learning about different religions for personal enrichment. I love how the author uses Mary Magdalene as her Lady, while Jesus is her Lord. Regardless of what the church says, I do believe that Mary Magdalene was Jesus's consort and that she was a powerful woman, hence why the Catholic church fears her and has tainted her name. I also like how the author follows "true" Christianity, which is what Jesus taught, being full of love and acceptance. Much different than what the churches teach nowadays. As I mentioned above, I truly enjoyed reading this book and might incorporate some of her suggestions into my daily life, but with a small modification. :-). Blessed Be!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jenne

    The book was written from the perspective of a Catholic Christian so she very much had different views than my own Christianity. I was able to understand most of her Catholic background but it still didn't provide for me the connection with Christianity I was hoping for. She does however share my frustrations with feminism being cast down, authority/organized religion truncating personal spirituality so much of what she wrote was very familiar. Overall, I liked it. I'm glad I own a copy of it an The book was written from the perspective of a Catholic Christian so she very much had different views than my own Christianity. I was able to understand most of her Catholic background but it still didn't provide for me the connection with Christianity I was hoping for. She does however share my frustrations with feminism being cast down, authority/organized religion truncating personal spirituality so much of what she wrote was very familiar. Overall, I liked it. I'm glad I own a copy of it and will likely refer to it in the future. This book is probably a good starting point for me as I study more of the Goddess, and the female counterpart to my Heavenly Father. Next we need a book written by a Mormon in how to honor the divine by connecting with nature and seeking the divine feminine in everyday life. But don't look at me for that...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy Law

    I picked up this book out curiosity and was pleasantly surprised. I very much enjoyed the book. Its more a spiritual diary more than anything. But done in a very enjoyable way. Recommended for: those that feel conflicted between the two religions This book does seem to bring up an issue I see more and more lately in the pagan community. Which is this animosity against any differing of opinions. Its truly sad. The people who claim to be the most open minded, seem to become the most closed minded. I picked up this book out curiosity and was pleasantly surprised. I very much enjoyed the book. Its more a spiritual diary more than anything. But done in a very enjoyable way. Recommended for: those that feel conflicted between the two religions This book does seem to bring up an issue I see more and more lately in the pagan community. Which is this animosity against any differing of opinions. Its truly sad. The people who claim to be the most open minded, seem to become the most closed minded. People get so quick to label something as fluffy bunny or wrong, without out taking in account different people need different paths, and that they have no right to judge someone another's path. If you are truly an open minded person and truly wish for true freedom of religion then I suggest stop becoming what you claim to hate the most.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kit

    This book was the first I read on my spiritual journey. I think it really bridged the gap between Christianity and witchcraft, and enforced my own belief that Church dogma and the teachings of Jesus are, often times, two separate things. I recommend this book for anyone interested in witchcraft, but unsure how it will mesh with currently held beliefs. You'll learn a lot.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Grete

    Part spiritual memoir, part apologetics, part how-to manual - this book tries to be and do too many things, and doesn't do any of them particularly well. Competent but uninspiring prose; curiously impersonal, for a memoir. St. Clair is seriously underinformed about the diversity within Christian theology and practice, and she relies heavily on stereotypes about the Church.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Linda Fithian

    Christian Witch here I absolutely loved this book. It made me understand my feelings and know that I am not alone. Very informative and simply explained. Bravo!!!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    The Overflowing Inkwell

    I've never understood people's connection with Jesus. Every few years, I come back to give Christianity another try, as if it were some food I disliked, and am tasting it again to see if my tastebuds have changed since last time. Having run in Pagan circles for a good deal of my life at the same time, this is one of those books to revisit Christianity with, a trial run, a merger of two parts of my life as well as hers, and also a book I was very surprised to find in our tiny library in the South I've never understood people's connection with Jesus. Every few years, I come back to give Christianity another try, as if it were some food I disliked, and am tasting it again to see if my tastebuds have changed since last time. Having run in Pagan circles for a good deal of my life at the same time, this is one of those books to revisit Christianity with, a trial run, a merger of two parts of my life as well as hers, and also a book I was very surprised to find in our tiny library in the South. But I still don't get it. This book felt too short, too vague. I enjoyed reading it, but I wished there was more in every section. Something more concrete, perhaps even an in-depth look at exactly what she felt was Jesus and what was Church. I did think it was strange that in one retelling of a bad sermon, she recounts ranting to her husband about the exclusion in church of (among others) divorcees. And while the divorcees themselves might be one thing, what does she think about those who remarry? Because that actually was one of the things Jesus said, that divorce is wrong and those who remarry are adulterers. I would loved to have heard more about what all they did at her magical school. It sounds brilliant.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book is much more a memoir than a “how to” book. So if that’s what your looking for it’s likely not going to satisfy. That said I love reading personal spiritual memoirs and like every one I have ever read there were real gems in this book. Sentences I just wanted to think about or linger over because they contained beautiful spiritual thoughts. If you want a primer on Wicca or paganism there are other places for that. But if you want to read about one woman’s spiritual journey and how she This book is much more a memoir than a “how to” book. So if that’s what your looking for it’s likely not going to satisfy. That said I love reading personal spiritual memoirs and like every one I have ever read there were real gems in this book. Sentences I just wanted to think about or linger over because they contained beautiful spiritual thoughts. If you want a primer on Wicca or paganism there are other places for that. But if you want to read about one woman’s spiritual journey and how she found freedom in drawing from different traditions, I recommend this book to you.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman

    Thank you, Adelina St Clair. I was feeling alone in my struggles and your experiences have helped ease my ... confusion. Like St Clair, I was raised Catholic, but then converted to Orthodoxy. I am still Ukrainian Orthodox though I feel pulled to a more natural path. Some friends and associates who realized my struggle, suggested this book - and I am so grateful. I feel as though a burden has been lifted. I just have to blend my worlds to mesh with what I am. As long as I harm no one, including my Thank you, Adelina St Clair. I was feeling alone in my struggles and your experiences have helped ease my ... confusion. Like St Clair, I was raised Catholic, but then converted to Orthodoxy. I am still Ukrainian Orthodox though I feel pulled to a more natural path. Some friends and associates who realized my struggle, suggested this book - and I am so grateful. I feel as though a burden has been lifted. I just have to blend my worlds to mesh with what I am. As long as I harm no one, including myself, then all is good.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Archer

    This book was exactly what I needed exactly when I needed it. I appreciate how the author was completely open and honest about her practice and how she got there. I can relate to so much of her spiritual experience and questions about religion ,God, Jesus and the Holy Sprit. This book was easy to read and understand and perfectly aligned the two practices to make them one. The author gave examples of daily practice, complex practices and easy practices. I am great full that the Universe put this This book was exactly what I needed exactly when I needed it. I appreciate how the author was completely open and honest about her practice and how she got there. I can relate to so much of her spiritual experience and questions about religion ,God, Jesus and the Holy Sprit. This book was easy to read and understand and perfectly aligned the two practices to make them one. The author gave examples of daily practice, complex practices and easy practices. I am great full that the Universe put this book in my path. Thank You

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    A really interesting and relatable memoir of someone who has Christian beliefs but is also drawn to a wider spirituality. The author makes an important distinction between faith and religion, one that speaks volumes to someone who is born and raised culturally Christian but also has sincere reservations about Christian dogma, doctrine and culture. It's a fascinating peek into the author's spirituality and how she's reconciled two seemingly contradictory traditions.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Moss

    this is one of the most beautiful accounts of a spiritual journey I have read so far ... pick this one up if you want validation if you've ever started to believe in something that seems odd. People are going to try and judge you ... exactly as this author went through. She's putting her story out there to tell you that this horrible misconception can be overcome. Puts multiple nails in the coffin of organized religion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Hartweg

    Encouraging in a time of confusion I am so glad for this book. I have been trying to find a balance between two different spiritual callings, and this book gives me so much comfort to know that I am not alone in this journey. It's given me a lot to think about, for sure, and I'm glad to have spent the time to read it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Very insightful. The whole ritual part of Christianity shown in Catholic churches has been omitted in Protestant churches, so coming from a Protestant background, some of the Catholic elements were lost on me. This book isn't the end-all, say-all, but it has given me plenty to think about and read into.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    The premise of this memoir intrigued me; I've always been interested in syncretism. One thing I found particularly compelling about this memoir is St. Clair's description of the dynamics between the Christian and Pagan communities.

  22. 5 out of 5

    donnarooks

    A must read Very interesting! A great book if your looking towards witchcraft without leaving behind some of the Christian traditions. I would reccomend this book for those searching for a path.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Puckett

    As someone living in the conservative South, who also has beliefs that would be considered "sinful" or "evil" by the church, this book was the first step on a journey of Self religious discovery for me. I am grateful for it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Onyx

    This book kind of came to me at the right time.... I have my doubts though, that the author has written this book under her real name, because to do that would have invited some to stone her and others to roast her. After all, this an attempt to join together two beliefs systems that are notoriously uncomfortable with each other into one that's workable. I nevertheless see a woman who was courageous enough to take an honest look at her beliefs and ask herself, "But what is it that I'm really abou This book kind of came to me at the right time.... I have my doubts though, that the author has written this book under her real name, because to do that would have invited some to stone her and others to roast her. After all, this an attempt to join together two beliefs systems that are notoriously uncomfortable with each other into one that's workable. I nevertheless see a woman who was courageous enough to take an honest look at her beliefs and ask herself, "But what is it that I'm really about mystically?" That isn't easy when almost every philosophy in the world tends to partition its beliefs, requiring its adherents to hold a certain way of seeing, which includes acknowledging who the allies are, who the enemy is, what the established rules are that you're supposed to play by, and so on....If you don't believe these things, then you're not one of us. So what happens when, like the author, a person faces the situation that places them in between belief systems, not really feeling totally part of one or totally part the other? What if they don't feel right in simply sacrificing one way of being for the sake of another in order to find a sense of community? Here is a person who seems to have the guts to take time to face herself and do some relevant soul-searching...and a ton of research, just in case she's being challenged to give an account for her faith. Being in between established systems, one ancient and one recent, she discovers that finding out what she exactly believes isn't as easy as simply choosing one way over another. Important choices are rarely that simple. At least she's being authentic about it...a lot of others will just go along with the flow and never ask if the road they walk on is where their heads....and hearts...are really at. This is a controversial book for sure. Some on both sides might scream "Blasphemy!" in one form or another, saying that you can't have your cake and eat it, too...you must choose. They will say, "Well, then you're not really Wiccan," or "Well, then you're not really Christian." The hybrid of beliefs reminds me of any child born of interracial relationships..."You're not Native American"..."You're not White"....or whatever. They're stuck in this limbo of self-identification, with all and sundry wanting to kill them off because they're half-breeds; embraced by none, demonized by all. And this is what she's got, only on a religious level. She has to name herself because nobody else is going to name her. (Well actually, I found out later that there Is a community called Trinitarian Witchcraft. You can look them up online.) Coming out like this puts her in a special kind of jeopardy. For those who feel beforehand that she's just trespassing, just deciding to dig up excuses to justify her present theological (thealogical?) position, there's nothing that can be done to ask them to listen before judging. Well, I wish her all the luck in the world because publishing this personal journey, although it might bring people who are hanging in philosophical suspension, like myself, an alternative perspective (even though I'm not Wiccan), it could invite some serious consequences for her to prepare herself for. But she probably already knew that and decided to publish her account anyway. I'm not going to say that she's right or wrong. But what I'm willing to say is that it will take an open mind to hear what she has to say without getting mad, because what she's saying here in her book is potentially inflammatory. I admire her bravery. The book has a lot of fresh, helpful ideas on how to (re)create my mystical time. I think it would be a book I'll be returning to a few times on how to pull together my own personal mystical time. I like some of those ideas, and some others gave me inspiration to write some of my own. One of the things that stuck out about this book was near the very end. It was "the creed" of sorts...a reworking of the Apostle's Creed to include both of what the author believed as a resulting harmonious alchemy of two conflicting belief systems. I may not have written it quite this way; nevertheless, I could imagine the word "we" replacing the word "I," and instead of one voice, hers, reciting the credo, I could imagine a whole community behind her reciting it in a room that slightly echoed inside the walls of any parish or temple. I don't know about you, but I found that rather inspiring. She knows how to write. Even the book's ending was an amalgamation of blessings from both faiths...."Blessed be, and peace be with you always." To which I could probably respond, "And may bright blessings also be with your spirit" or something.... Not bad. What I appreciate overall is that, while I have do a lot of books relative to the subject she wrote on, she gave me a much better understanding about my own interest than almost all the other books I got. But I guess if it wasn't for me reading the other books first, I wouldn't have realized how she would have tied together all of what I learned within such a neat little box. I kind of like that. My research time wasn't wasted. :-)

  25. 5 out of 5

    THT Steph

    While the author and I have both similar views on some things, and completely opposing views on others, there was something to be learned just by reading the viewpoint of another person's journey.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gracie

    Very well written, and informative, as well as informal and somehow familiar. I only wish it were longer. As it is, I'll just keep re-reading it!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Shields

    Dumb book of no substance. Would have done better as a series of blogposts. She also casually uses the slur “Gypsy.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I enjoyed this book since I have recently re-explored my Catholic roots by attending RCIA and getting confirmed at age 48. I was curious as to how the author bridged the thinking between Catholicism and being a Witch. I think she has done well although I don't agree with some because that isn't my experience. I do agree there is a lot of occult in the Catholic church which I find fascinating. The rigidity of the church though has turned me away but I also took a lot away from my experience.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Betty Cross

    A truly original spiritual perspective, but it's likely to drive mainstream theologians (whether Catholic, Protestant or Orthodox) nuts. Ms. St. Clair describes a journey of spiritual discovery. She is not out to found a new religion. She may not even have a coven. Much of what she does is in the "solitary practitioner" mode. Recommended for neo-Pagans and those who feel internally torn when faced with the choice of being Pagan or Christian.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    was well written and I enjoyed finding there were many connections or similarities in paganism and Christianity. Was nice knowing I'm not completely alone in my journey and though I may not be a catholic or witch I understand the dilemma of finding your own inner voice and peace and feeling you belong. excellent book will be rereading it in the future. loads of great advice for developing a practice.

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