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Thanks to their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia are much more like children than wolf cubs now. They are accustomed to wearing clothes. They hardly ever howl at the moon. And for the most part, they resist the urge to chase squirrels up trees. Yet the Incorrigibles are not entirely civilized, and still managed to ruin Lady Constanc Thanks to their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia are much more like children than wolf cubs now. They are accustomed to wearing clothes. They hardly ever howl at the moon. And for the most part, they resist the urge to chase squirrels up trees. Yet the Incorrigibles are not entirely civilized, and still managed to ruin Lady Constance's Christmas ball, nearly destroying the grand house. So while Ashton Place is being restored, Penelope, the Ashtons, and the children take up residence in London. As they explore the city, Penelope and the Incorrigibles discover more about themselves as clues about the children's--and Penelope's own--mysterious past crop up in the most unexpected ways...


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Thanks to their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia are much more like children than wolf cubs now. They are accustomed to wearing clothes. They hardly ever howl at the moon. And for the most part, they resist the urge to chase squirrels up trees. Yet the Incorrigibles are not entirely civilized, and still managed to ruin Lady Constanc Thanks to their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia are much more like children than wolf cubs now. They are accustomed to wearing clothes. They hardly ever howl at the moon. And for the most part, they resist the urge to chase squirrels up trees. Yet the Incorrigibles are not entirely civilized, and still managed to ruin Lady Constance's Christmas ball, nearly destroying the grand house. So while Ashton Place is being restored, Penelope, the Ashtons, and the children take up residence in London. As they explore the city, Penelope and the Incorrigibles discover more about themselves as clues about the children's--and Penelope's own--mysterious past crop up in the most unexpected ways...

30 review for The Hidden Gallery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    "Strange babies," the woman intoned. "Wolf babies! Be careful!" She tapped the card with her long crooked index finger. "The hunter is on the loose." Well, this one was nowhere near as charming as the first book. With Ashton Place in a state of disrepair after the disastrous Christmas ball, Lady Constance decides to temporarily relocate to London, where she hopes to take the city by storm. A tempest may indeed be brewing, as Miss Lumley and her Incorrigible charges are along for the trip. Urban te "Strange babies," the woman intoned. "Wolf babies! Be careful!" She tapped the card with her long crooked index finger. "The hunter is on the loose." Well, this one was nowhere near as charming as the first book. With Ashton Place in a state of disrepair after the disastrous Christmas ball, Lady Constance decides to temporarily relocate to London, where she hopes to take the city by storm. A tempest may indeed be brewing, as Miss Lumley and her Incorrigible charges are along for the trip. Urban temptations abound for a trio of children raised by wolves, not the least of which is the tasty pigeon-shaped snacks roaming the streets and parks. There are many educational outings, including a memorable trip to Buckingham Palace, and a visit to the British "Mew-eezum." We are introduced to Simon Harley-Dickson, a probable love interest for Miss Lumley. And speaking of that dear girl, she has an adventure on a runaway velocipede, and shares a tasty luncheon with her favorite teacher. Far from being a comfort, Miss Mortimer is behaving strangely, and fills the girl's head many unanswered questions. Oh, dear. The entire book answers none of the quandaries posed in the first volume, while tossing even more mysteries into the pot. So, though I didn't enjoy this one as much as the first story, I'll move on to number three. Inquiring minds just gotta know. And, as Agatha Swanburne, founder of the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, cautions, "Time will tell, but only in hindsight, for time is not talking just yet."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Sometimes surreal, often hilarious, this book made me laugh out loud in a crowded café, and I gobbled it all up with total delight. I love, love, love this series! The Incorrigibles are wonderful, and the mad zaniness of this whole book is just delicious. It is such a pleasure to read such a funny series, with so much heart underneath the humor. My favorite Swanburne-ism from this book: "As Agatha Swanburne once said, 'To be kept waiting is unfortunate, but to be kept waiting with nothing intere Sometimes surreal, often hilarious, this book made me laugh out loud in a crowded café, and I gobbled it all up with total delight. I love, love, love this series! The Incorrigibles are wonderful, and the mad zaniness of this whole book is just delicious. It is such a pleasure to read such a funny series, with so much heart underneath the humor. My favorite Swanburne-ism from this book: "As Agatha Swanburne once said, 'To be kept waiting is unfortunate, but to be kept waiting with nothing interesting to read is a tragedy of Greek proportions.'" I am definitely a Swanburne girl wannabe!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cortney LaScola - The Bookworm Myrtle Beach

    Enjoyed another adventure with the Incorrigibles and Penelope and I loved the addition of Simon! I hope we see him in the next book too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeni

    Although I like the writing of these books, there is something ultimately unsatisfying in the plot. I don't mind the mysterious referrals to hidden identities, etc. and the gradual revealing of clues to the past. But each book itself doesn't have a main plot or climax. The first one was "we had a Christmas party and things went terribly wrong." This book is basically "we went to London and things went terribly wrong, but we are becoming aware that something strange is going on behind the scenes. Although I like the writing of these books, there is something ultimately unsatisfying in the plot. I don't mind the mysterious referrals to hidden identities, etc. and the gradual revealing of clues to the past. But each book itself doesn't have a main plot or climax. The first one was "we had a Christmas party and things went terribly wrong." This book is basically "we went to London and things went terribly wrong, but we are becoming aware that something strange is going on behind the scenes." If you are going to write a series, that's fine - I love reading those. But at least make each book able to stand alone on its own plot. There is too much reference to the first book here, reminders of things that really don't matter to this story, as flimsy as it is. So I like the language these are written in, but actually both of these books could be combined, in my opinion. If you have a big point to make, at least be making smaller points along the way; don't keep dawdling with minor adventures hinting that there's a bigger adventure just ahead out of reach. Did this book have an editor?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    These books are so cute!! I recommend the audio version. The reader is a brilliant actress and the British accent makes me want a cuppa tea while enjoying the story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Booth

    A nice second to a series. The kids are back with their intrepid governess and in London to shake things up for polite society and learn some more pieces in the story of our heroine and her charges. Lady Astor is about as difficult an individual as one ever hopes to meet and finds London doesn’t quite suit her idea of things. The mysteries deepen with each new clue and the entertainment factor is high. I shall keep reading this series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    There is an undeniable charm about Maryrose Wood's odd tales of the three Incorrigible children who were literally raised by wolves until they were rescued by a wealthy British lord Frederick Ashton and placed under the loving if sometimes flustered care of Miss Penelope Lumley, lately graduated from Swanbourne Academy for Poor Bright Females. I love the quirky humor, the witty wisdom from all those Agatha Swanbourne quotes, and Penelope's vibrant spirit. The Victoriana is a delight, too. This i There is an undeniable charm about Maryrose Wood's odd tales of the three Incorrigible children who were literally raised by wolves until they were rescued by a wealthy British lord Frederick Ashton and placed under the loving if sometimes flustered care of Miss Penelope Lumley, lately graduated from Swanbourne Academy for Poor Bright Females. I love the quirky humor, the witty wisdom from all those Agatha Swanbourne quotes, and Penelope's vibrant spirit. The Victoriana is a delight, too. This installment finds the children and Penelope in London, with a Hixby's guide book that doesn't seem to have very helpful directions to anything--except a mysterious hidden gallery!--and which some nefarious persons would like to get their hands on. There are odd warnings from gypsy women involving a "hunt," and the charming attentions of a handsome young man who befriends Penelope and the children in an hour of need, and then the taxing tasks of trying to keep the children from climbing up the palace guards (those tall fur hats! why they look like bears!) and running wild in the London Zoo. And why, oh why, is Lord Ashton so obsessed with his almanac and the cycles of the moon? As much as I smiled my way through the book, I did find the constant "wolf-talk" of the children a bit grating at times. And I found it grossly unfair that Penelope solves a mystery at the end but the author doesn't let the readers in on it. Of course, I thought smugly (I'll admit it) to myself, *I* solved that particular "mystery" at the end of the first book--but perhaps younger readers would still be a bit baffled. Still, on the whole it's a charming read and I will probably seek out the next book to finish the series and see if I really am right about that mystery!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Your Lemony Snicket fans sobbing in the aisles because they've read the series five times? Hand them The Mysterious Howling and this sequel. Penelope Lumley, having gotten the feral children to a presentable state only to have the house come down around their ears on Christmas, has the brilliant idea to go to London while the house is being fixed. She can meet with her teacher, Miss Mortimer while Lady Constance embraces the social whirl. Educational opportunities for the children abound, but ce Your Lemony Snicket fans sobbing in the aisles because they've read the series five times? Hand them The Mysterious Howling and this sequel. Penelope Lumley, having gotten the feral children to a presentable state only to have the house come down around their ears on Christmas, has the brilliant idea to go to London while the house is being fixed. She can meet with her teacher, Miss Mortimer while Lady Constance embraces the social whirl. Educational opportunities for the children abound, but certain things, like the hats on the Buckingham Palace guards, set them off, and the fact that someone is trying to do them in doesn't help. With the help of a guide book that Miss Lumley's parents had, she finds a few clues as to why someone might wish the children ill, and also a few hints about her own past. Strengths: The voice and choice of language. Funny, funny stuff. There are Snicketesque asides on vocabulary, but they aren't irritating. Penelope is a great character, and a great teacher. Jon Klassen's illustrations are wonderful and remind me of some childhood books I can't quite put my finger on. Weaknesses: The mysteries are not intriguing me, for some reason, and the feral children's addition of "woo" to words (while perhaps realistic) started to grate on me. Small complaints.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Two books in, and I'm still enjoying this series. I like the characters, especially Penelope, a lot, I'm interested by the central mystery, and I really like the narrator on the audiobooks. This is one of the best uses of a Lemony Snicket style narrator outside A Series of Unfortunate Events, which makes me very happy. And yet I'm started to feel slightly frustrated with the pace that central mystery is unfolding at. It's going very, very slowly, so much so that I'm starting to think that there Two books in, and I'm still enjoying this series. I like the characters, especially Penelope, a lot, I'm interested by the central mystery, and I really like the narrator on the audiobooks. This is one of the best uses of a Lemony Snicket style narrator outside A Series of Unfortunate Events, which makes me very happy. And yet I'm started to feel slightly frustrated with the pace that central mystery is unfolding at. It's going very, very slowly, so much so that I'm starting to think that there isn't really enough mystery to support six books. And outside of that central mystery, there really isn't much plot to speak of. If it weren't for liking the characters so much, I doubt I'd get through this series. And yet, I continue, and I hope I won't be terribly disappointed in the end.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    No. I needed something to listen to and this was available. I thought that maybe my opinion might have changed about this series since I last listened to the first book, but no. I found this story too slow moving and odd, even though the Incorrigible children took a backseat to the governess this time around and I find that character more interesting than the children. Will not continue on with this series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joel Larson

    I CANNOT GET ENOUGH OF THIS SERIES. If you mixed the style of Series of Unfortunate Events with the spirit of Anne of Green Gables and the setting of Jane Eyre, with a good bit of British wit and humor thrown in for good measure, the Incorrigibles are what you'd get. Also would 10/10 recommend the audiobooks read by Katherine Kellgren, she is a genius!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    One Sentence Review: A stellar sequel in a great series though it does maddeningly create more questions than it answers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Caridee Chau

    Due to the author's craft and the slow-moving plot of the book "The Hidden Gallery" by Maryrose Wood, I have decided to give up completing it. I found the characters unappealing. I first decided to pick up the book due to an introduction of werewolf children in the blurb and their struggle to adapt to the norms of human society. However, upon reading the book, I found that the "wolf children" were quite like normal children apart from their lacking ability to speak and their urges to chase squir Due to the author's craft and the slow-moving plot of the book "The Hidden Gallery" by Maryrose Wood, I have decided to give up completing it. I found the characters unappealing. I first decided to pick up the book due to an introduction of werewolf children in the blurb and their struggle to adapt to the norms of human society. However, upon reading the book, I found that the "wolf children" were quite like normal children apart from their lacking ability to speak and their urges to chase squirrels up trees. Due to their inability to comprehend human languages, I didn't get to see much of their personalities apart from their playful sides when chasing creatures. This made the characters less memorable for me. Penelope and Lady Constance, who somehow possessed the ability to speak when her children didn't and weren't taught to, narrated the story in too formal and calm a way that caused me to interpret events differently than the author. This in turn, muddled up events for me and made the book less enjoyable. For those who thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, I just simply didn't see or feel what you did during "The Hidden Gallery".

  14. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Picking up shortly after the events of The Mysterious Howling, indefatiguable teenage governess Penelope Lumley is back, along with her charges, Alexander, Beowulf, and Casseopia Incorrigible, three siblings who were actually (probably) raised by wolves. Also back is Nutsawoo, the squirrel that Casseopia unexpectedly adopted as a pet after he crashed Lady Constance's Christmas party. When the human inhabitants of Ashton place are packed off to London during estate repairs, poor little Nutsawoo i Picking up shortly after the events of The Mysterious Howling, indefatiguable teenage governess Penelope Lumley is back, along with her charges, Alexander, Beowulf, and Casseopia Incorrigible, three siblings who were actually (probably) raised by wolves. Also back is Nutsawoo, the squirrel that Casseopia unexpectedly adopted as a pet after he crashed Lady Constance's Christmas party. When the human inhabitants of Ashton place are packed off to London during estate repairs, poor little Nutsawoo is left behind. “Of course we will send postcards to Nutsawoo. And we shall bring him back a present as well. In fact,' she went on, with the instinctive knack every good governess has for turning something enjoyable into a lesson, and vice versa, 'I will expect all three of you to practice your writing by keeping a journal of our trip so that Nutsawoo may know how we spend our days. Why, by the time we return, he will think he has been to London himself! He will be the envy of all his little squirrel friends,' she declared. Penelope had no way of knowing if this last statement was true. Could squirrels feel envy? Would they give two figs about London? Did Nutsawoo even have friends?” While Penelope attempts to make the children's (and, indeed, her own) first trip to London educational and culturally enriching, strange events continue to follow the quartet, including a creepy warning from a mysterious gypsy woman, a guidebook that is often less than helpful, a confusing encounter with Penelope's former headmistress and more strange behavior from Lord Ashton. More questions than clues regarding the Incorrigibles' origins (as well as Penelope's) pile up, with no real answers, but since this is only the second of six books, I'll assume that all the mysteries will eventually be solved. In the meantime, I'll be satisfied with charming passages like this: “Nowadays, people resort to all kinds of activities in order to calm themselves after a stressful event: performing yoga poses in a sauna, leaping off bridges while tied to a bungee, killing imaginary zombies with imaginary weapons, and so forth. But in Miss Penelope Lumley's day, it was universally understood that there is nothing like a nice cup of tea to settle one's nerves in the aftermath of an adventure- a practice many would find well worth reviving.”

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karen Barber

    After the chaos caused by the children at the ball, Ashton Place is in need of renovation. To make this palatable, the whole family pack up and move to London for a time. Penelope receives an unusual illustrated guide to London, the like of which has never before been seen, from her ex-headmistress and it's evident that something odd is going on. Characters who don't seem to exist, strange noises from the attic, an obsession with charting the phases of the moon and people attempting to attack the After the chaos caused by the children at the ball, Ashton Place is in need of renovation. To make this palatable, the whole family pack up and move to London for a time. Penelope receives an unusual illustrated guide to London, the like of which has never before been seen, from her ex-headmistress and it's evident that something odd is going on. Characters who don't seem to exist, strange noises from the attic, an obsession with charting the phases of the moon and people attempting to attack the children. There's the usual chaos surrounding the children, and Penelope's determination to hang onto the power of education is amusing. Though it's good fun, the clues about the origins of the children and suggestion that Penelope is linked were never developed and this felt rather short on answers.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susy C. *MotherLambReads*

    4.5 ⭐️s Littles loved this book. Story gets more and more mysterious. The vocabulary in these books are pretty high level. Love how they explain what a word is through the story's characters. Some parental guidance probably needed as it mentions a fortune teller and past curses on the children. For a highly sensitive child it could be a tad scary.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen ⊰✿

    Another cute instalment where Penelope tries valiantly to educate the Incorrigibles despite continual disruptions and mysteries. We still don’t have answers on the children’s parents or the connection with Penelope but there are lots of clues which are perhaps more obvious for adult readers. Quite a bit of fun!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Devil

    Imagine that you are waiting impatiently to watch your favorite show on tv and just when the show is about to begin, the power goes off. How would you feel? . . . . That's exactly how I felt when I finished reading this book. Just when I thought things were spicing up a bit, the author put the end card thereby clipping the wings of my high flying spirits.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Liz F.

    I enjoyed the second book in the Incorrigible Children series! I think I will continue to read them! ;) 4 stars.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    A lot of fun. The mysteries in this series unfold very slowly but it's pleasant reading (or, in our case listening) so I don't mind.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    4.7 stars I adore this series. The characters jump off the page and Penelope is a wonderful heroine - compassionate, plucky, hard-working, and practical. The writing has lots of witty asides and tangents, but they are all so delightful I never mind that it slows the story. I find myself wanting to quote the intrepid Agatha Swanburne and wishing I could discuss poetry with Penelope. The audio books are magnificent.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    In the last installment, Ashton Place was left in ruins thanks to The Incorrigibles and their new pet squirrel, Nutsawoo. This one picks up a month or so after. As repairs are still underway, Lady Ashton gets the bright idea (of course, after it was mentioned to her by Miss Lumley) to temporarily move everyone into a London townhouse. This presents plenty of opportunity for “educashawoo” excursions for Miss Lumley and The Incorrigibles as well as social opportunities for Lady Ashton. Or so, that In the last installment, Ashton Place was left in ruins thanks to The Incorrigibles and their new pet squirrel, Nutsawoo. This one picks up a month or so after. As repairs are still underway, Lady Ashton gets the bright idea (of course, after it was mentioned to her by Miss Lumley) to temporarily move everyone into a London townhouse. This presents plenty of opportunity for “educashawoo” excursions for Miss Lumley and The Incorrigibles as well as social opportunities for Lady Ashton. Or so, that’s the plan. But, as the book points out even the best laid plans go astray. The book started a tad slower than the first one, but once it got going it was pretty good. I liked how Ms. Wood reminds readers of what happened in the previous book without going on for pages or interrupting the flow of the current story. Not many authors share this talent. She’s also able to inject educational tidbits without bringing the story down. In this second installment, we have the same characters as before but we also meet a nice playwriter dubbed Simawoo by the children and we finally meet Miss Mortimer, Penelope’s old school mistress. We also meet Gypsawoo and some pirates! As for the mystery portion of the story, just like the last one there is no resolution. However, readers are given a few more clues, so the plot thickens in time for the third installment. Like the first this one is a fun read. It’s appealing to children of both sexes and I think adults will enjoy it too. This was one of my favorite quotes in the book: "As Agatha Swanburne once said, 'To be kept waiting is unfortunate, but to be kept waiting with nothing interesting to read is a tragedy of Greek proportions.'" So true, Agatha. So true.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mara

    This series is certainly going to develop is some interesting ways - ways that I am having a hard time imagining. The Hidden Gallery is actually better than The Mysterious Howling; a great rarity, that, for a sequel to be better than its predecessor. Penelope Lumley continues to be a terrific heroine - sensible, brave, and not one to give into silly whims or brook any nonsense. When she wants something, she accomplishes it; no questions asked. And the children are just as cute as before - perhap This series is certainly going to develop is some interesting ways - ways that I am having a hard time imagining. The Hidden Gallery is actually better than The Mysterious Howling; a great rarity, that, for a sequel to be better than its predecessor. Penelope Lumley continues to be a terrific heroine - sensible, brave, and not one to give into silly whims or brook any nonsense. When she wants something, she accomplishes it; no questions asked. And the children are just as cute as before - perhaps more so. The Hidden Gallery introduces many new characters, one of them being Simon Harley-Dickinson - a truly wonderful, unannoying young man who also happens to be an actor - and a few other mysterious ones. Maryrose Wood manages to offer just enough answers and illusions to what may be going on without giving too much away, maintaining the Reader's curiosity and suspense. At times, The Hidden Gallery was strange - the chase scene towards the end had me truly baffled; I had to wonder if I was reading it correctly. But judging by how this series is turning (and believe me, I was never expecting it), I think that strange is probably going to be quite normal for it. But I feel that it will be a good strange, maybe mixed in with a little "okay, that was odd" strange. I desperately look forward to the next installment!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    It seems odd to say that a book I read in a couple hours dragged, but The Hidden Gallery did. The story itself, a continuation of The Mysterious Howling, should have been lively enough, but Wood's Lemony Snickett-esque explanations seemed intrusive here, slowing the pace rather than providing comic relief or enhancing the mood of the story. In fact, dragging the story out seems to be the main objective in the series. I would have found it more enjoyable to have the "mysteries" introduced in The It seems odd to say that a book I read in a couple hours dragged, but The Hidden Gallery did. The story itself, a continuation of The Mysterious Howling, should have been lively enough, but Wood's Lemony Snickett-esque explanations seemed intrusive here, slowing the pace rather than providing comic relief or enhancing the mood of the story. In fact, dragging the story out seems to be the main objective in the series. I would have found it more enjoyable to have the "mysteries" introduced in The Mysterious Howling resolved earlier in the book, and new, more convoluted ones introduced, but, no, everything is dragged out as long as possible. Penelope may have pluck, but she seems a bit slow on the uptake in this installment. Having said that, I think the story of the mysterious wolf-like children and their governess is an appealing one, and I think many children would enjoy the series, especially young but strong readers. The clues are pronounced enough that a younger reader would feel good about noticing them before the heroine, and offer just the amount of mystery to engage their imagination without making outcomes too obvious.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Book Two of the delightful and hilarious Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, this book was even better than the first. It delves deeper into the storyline and unearths some mystery surrounding the unique...situation of the Incorrigibles. The fun characters are entertainingly woven through a fascinating and complicated plot; I understand a good deal of the mystery now, and I'm still not sure where this is going. Definitely recommended for younger readers, but also good for older readers looking Book Two of the delightful and hilarious Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, this book was even better than the first. It delves deeper into the storyline and unearths some mystery surrounding the unique...situation of the Incorrigibles. The fun characters are entertainingly woven through a fascinating and complicated plot; I understand a good deal of the mystery now, and I'm still not sure where this is going. Definitely recommended for younger readers, but also good for older readers looking for something light-hearted. This series has the great qualities of a classic children's book, like E Nesbit's or Edward Eager's work. In full disclosure, I have only listened to the series on audiobook. Katherine Kellgren's narration is excellent, but I understand the books do have good illustrations.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I think that I may have liked this book less than the first one because of the audio book. I wasn't so much a fan. I think it might have been the fact that the narrator made the annoying characters' voices REALLY REALLY ANNOYING. Like annoying to the point where I had to turn down the volume to keep my eardrums from bursting. Anyway. Too effectively annoying audio book narrator aside, I do really like this series. I love Penelope and I care about her and want to know what happens. It's reminding I think that I may have liked this book less than the first one because of the audio book. I wasn't so much a fan. I think it might have been the fact that the narrator made the annoying characters' voices REALLY REALLY ANNOYING. Like annoying to the point where I had to turn down the volume to keep my eardrums from bursting. Anyway. Too effectively annoying audio book narrator aside, I do really like this series. I love Penelope and I care about her and want to know what happens. It's reminding me a lot of Lemony Snicket in that the author does NOT like to divulge secrets. Not only are the secrets from the first book not solved, but there are a ton MORE secrets and mysteries piled on. I must admit I kind of like the piled on mystery/secret thing, but I think it might annoy some readers? I do want to keep reading this series. Mostly because Penelope and her charges are so...charming.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    I enjoyed The Mysterious Howling enough to continue on to this book; I may read the third but I'm starting to lose interest! This book in particular felt repetitive, 3/4 of the way through I felt like I would barf if I heard one more quote or reference to Agatha Swanburne. The relationship between the children and Penelope is still really endearing and fun; overall I would not hesitate to recommend this series to a middle-grade reader.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is the second book in The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place by Maryrose Wood. interesting quotes (page numbers from edition with ISBN13): "When a great distance must be leaped, a running start is recommended. So get running." (p.) "" (p.) "" (p.) "" (p.) This is the second book in The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place by Maryrose Wood. interesting quotes (page numbers from edition with ISBN13): "When a great distance must be leaped, a running start is recommended. So get running." (p.) "" (p.) "" (p.) "" (p.)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Simply hilarious! And delightful! I would've loved this series in middle school. However, deep down I think it's written for us adults.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    Err yes please, this book was amazing. If I take a step back I see how the plotline is unorthodox and surely, the unanswered questions still left from The Mysterious Howling (#1) and the many more mysteries introduced in this book would leave me unsatisfied. But the thing is, this read was so far from unsatisfying it's laughable to even consider. Penelope is one of the most wonderful main characters ever. Her consideration, pluck, brains and ability to re-focus are admirable, and I do admire her Err yes please, this book was amazing. If I take a step back I see how the plotline is unorthodox and surely, the unanswered questions still left from The Mysterious Howling (#1) and the many more mysteries introduced in this book would leave me unsatisfied. But the thing is, this read was so far from unsatisfying it's laughable to even consider. Penelope is one of the most wonderful main characters ever. Her consideration, pluck, brains and ability to re-focus are admirable, and I do admire her greatly! The Incorrigible children are so brilliant and Wood's writing is unique and stylish. This book is set in the 1800s but the narrator occasionally makes reference to the modern day, sounds jarring but it works really well, along with the motivational & wise quotations sprinkled throughout. There are many references and explanations of real world history, facts, words, objects and occasions; full of gems for both children and adults. And I would frame the illustrations, so cute! Spending time with The Hidden Gallery was seriously good fun, somehow even more enjoyable than book 1. It's amusing (laugh out loud hilarity) and dramatic (literal gasp, have to get up with the excitement). Too good.

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