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At the dawn of "Morning in America"--a period that would nurse the rise of suit-and-tie culture--there emerged a national network of anti-corporate record shops, college radio stations, fanzines, nightclubs, and entrepreneurial record labels. In the watershed year 1981, this "indie" scene fostered several seminal releases. Among recordings by bands such as Sonic Youth, Blac At the dawn of "Morning in America"--a period that would nurse the rise of suit-and-tie culture--there emerged a national network of anti-corporate record shops, college radio stations, fanzines, nightclubs, and entrepreneurial record labels. In the watershed year 1981, this "indie" scene fostered several seminal releases. Among recordings by bands such as Sonic Youth, Black Flag, Husker Du, The Minutemen, and R.E.M. was an album called "Sorry Ma . . . Forgot to Take Out the Trash", recorded by a scruffy, flannel-clad quartet from Minneapolis called The Replacements. Now, for the first time, all of the hearsay, half-truths, legends, and allegations associated with this maelstrom of a rock & roll band are unraveled in this oral history by longtime Twin Cities music journalist Jim Walsh. Through interviews with family, friends, and fans; former manager Peter Jesperson; Twin/Tone record label cofounder Paul Stark; and musicians around the nation influenced by the band, Walsh lays bare with painful clarity a tale that unfolds like a tragic comedy in three perfect acts. Celebrated by national publications, "the Mats" often seemed more hell-bent on sabotaging their status as critical darlings than parlaying it. With their markedly apolitical stance amid their decidedly political peers, their uncool embrace of "classic rock" influences like KISS and The Faces, and their Dionysian appetites (and the resulting tendency to literally fall on their own faces), The Replacements lasted 12 years despite themselves. From the bands founding to their rise through the local and national club circuits, their major label deal in 1985, and the slow and painful implosion that followed, The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting lays down the gripping oral history behind the little band that could--but didn't.


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At the dawn of "Morning in America"--a period that would nurse the rise of suit-and-tie culture--there emerged a national network of anti-corporate record shops, college radio stations, fanzines, nightclubs, and entrepreneurial record labels. In the watershed year 1981, this "indie" scene fostered several seminal releases. Among recordings by bands such as Sonic Youth, Blac At the dawn of "Morning in America"--a period that would nurse the rise of suit-and-tie culture--there emerged a national network of anti-corporate record shops, college radio stations, fanzines, nightclubs, and entrepreneurial record labels. In the watershed year 1981, this "indie" scene fostered several seminal releases. Among recordings by bands such as Sonic Youth, Black Flag, Husker Du, The Minutemen, and R.E.M. was an album called "Sorry Ma . . . Forgot to Take Out the Trash", recorded by a scruffy, flannel-clad quartet from Minneapolis called The Replacements. Now, for the first time, all of the hearsay, half-truths, legends, and allegations associated with this maelstrom of a rock & roll band are unraveled in this oral history by longtime Twin Cities music journalist Jim Walsh. Through interviews with family, friends, and fans; former manager Peter Jesperson; Twin/Tone record label cofounder Paul Stark; and musicians around the nation influenced by the band, Walsh lays bare with painful clarity a tale that unfolds like a tragic comedy in three perfect acts. Celebrated by national publications, "the Mats" often seemed more hell-bent on sabotaging their status as critical darlings than parlaying it. With their markedly apolitical stance amid their decidedly political peers, their uncool embrace of "classic rock" influences like KISS and The Faces, and their Dionysian appetites (and the resulting tendency to literally fall on their own faces), The Replacements lasted 12 years despite themselves. From the bands founding to their rise through the local and national club circuits, their major label deal in 1985, and the slow and painful implosion that followed, The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting lays down the gripping oral history behind the little band that could--but didn't.

30 review for The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting: An Oral History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Duke Haney

    A reviewer somewhere below refers to the Replacements as “tragically overrated.” Clever line, dude, in a mediocre sort of way. Now let’s see you sustain that level of mediocre cleverness in review after review, as consistently as Paul Westerberg wrote songs with gems small and large in a lyric as well as sonic sense. I’m holding my fucking breath. Now comes before us a bunch of reviewers who apparently think that oral histories began with Please Kill Me, so that this oral history of the Replace A reviewer somewhere below refers to the Replacements as “tragically overrated.” Clever line, dude, in a mediocre sort of way. Now let’s see you sustain that level of mediocre cleverness in review after review, as consistently as Paul Westerberg wrote songs with gems small and large in a lyric as well as sonic sense. I’m holding my fucking breath. Now comes before us a bunch of reviewers who apparently think that oral histories began with Please Kill Me, so that this oral history of the Replacements is a “rip-off.” Don’t you just love how people always stand at the quick with accusations of forms, or ideas or whatever, being ripped off? Yeah, and so does my copy of Edie, an oral history of Edie Sedgwick, which predates Please Kill Me by seventeen years, as well as my copy of Jack’s Book, an oral history of Jack Kerouac, published seven years prior to Edie. People, people. I know it’s tempting to want to cast stones—believe me, I feel the urge to cast stones all the time—but let us ask ourselves beforehand if we’re truly authorized to do so, yes? A little knowledge, ineptly applied, causes us to appear, well, little. In fact, this book, strictly speaking, isn't an oral history. Too many of the accounts in it were clearly written, not spoken into a tape recorder, by people who don’t know how to write well, despite painful-to-read effort. Either way, something evocative occasionally occurs, per this bit from a fan’s account of purchasing his copy of Let It Be, arguably the Replacements' best work: I remember it as a cool fall night. It seems to me it was a Wednesday night. And maybe it was none of those things, but that’s the way I remember it. I just couldn’t believe the album was finally out. Anticipation at last rewarded. Remember that? Probably not. Sorry this is taking so long, you busy, busy people out there. Of course I couldn’t possibly be busy, so I’m going to sum up by saying that if you think that the Replacements are overrated, tragically or not, you should proceed to iTunes, a sub-god of the greatest god of all, Apple, which oversees all music, and have a listen. Even though that won’t really work, because the Replacements had to be seen live to be fully appreciated. But never mind. That was in fact the name of one of their songs, “Never Mind.” Think that has any connection to Nevermind, the classic album by Nirvana? Of course it doesn’t! Or maybe, without kneeling to the great god Apple, you can listen to “Never Mind,” which is of course tragically overrated: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W42APB... Or you can listen to another tragically overrated, though gorgeous, song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faAFV... Or another one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n2EO... And now, busy, busy people, I really will conclude with this bit from an L.A. radio interview with Paul and Tommy of the Replacements, a transcription of a transcription included in All Over But the Shouting: D.J.: When are you playing in town? PAUL: Maybe tomorrow night. D.J.: Where? PAUL: I don’t know. D.J. [sarcastically]: That’s a good answer, my friend. The next song up is “I.O.U.” What can you tell us about it? PAUL: God, he’s got a great voice, don’t he? TOMMY: It’s a fake voice. Listen to him. PAUL: No, he’s a fucking professional. Oops. I’m not supposed to swear, I guess.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    While reading this book I spent a lot of time trying to decide whether or not The Replacements were complete assholes. Their story as young kids coming together (their bassist was 13!) to form a band is incredible. Their lyrics to later ballads are touching and inspired (though I admire their earlier punk delinquency more, of the “I hate music, sometimes I don’t / I hate music, it has too many notes” variety). But so much of the recollection in this oral history is about this band--so important While reading this book I spent a lot of time trying to decide whether or not The Replacements were complete assholes. Their story as young kids coming together (their bassist was 13!) to form a band is incredible. Their lyrics to later ballads are touching and inspired (though I admire their earlier punk delinquency more, of the “I hate music, sometimes I don’t / I hate music, it has too many notes” variety). But so much of the recollection in this oral history is about this band--so important to independent bands and the Midwest--acting like rock star assholes: constantly drunk, destroying hotel rooms. Paul Westerberg wound up playing the role of poet-tyrant who called the shots, fired band members, and ultimately made some poor calculations about “getting big” with a major label, resulting in some lame later albums in their discography. This classic rock assholery makes banal reading of one of the most beloved underground rock bands. I suspect that a better oral history book could have produced a more interesting narrative. Much praise given by people interviewed in this book is deserved. But there’s a lot of hyperbole about the Mats being the greatest rock n roll band or whatever. They’re not. In fact, no band is. If you find yourself calling one band the greatest, then it just means that you haven’t heard enough bands. As times change, so do the frames in which we hear bands. With time, bands take on new meanings and sounds. Our ears change and we hear different things. Contexts shift and bands’ influence and importance do too. The Replacements are interesting because, in retrospect, they bridged hardcore audiences with college rock audiences, setting things up for the industry-created genre of “alternative,” and its underground indie counterparts. And they put the “roll” back into a lot of staid rock at the time. But after traveling 267 pages culled from scores of interviews, I arrive at the same place as I was before reading the book. After all is over, the Replacements were a band whose first three releases were great. Nothing more, nothing less. I’m into The Replacements much like I’m into a number of west coast punk bands from the same years: Crime, The Urinals, Flipper, The Germs, The Minutemen. Like those bands, the early Mats had furious youthful energy, a biting sense of humor, and a keen sense of artful delinquency.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angie and the Daily Book Dose

    The Replacements. I am very fortunate to have seen them at one of their reunion gigs at Riot Fest in Denver 2013. The performance changed my life. I wasn't the overweight and underwhelmed with life 40 year old; for about two solid hours I was young and alive, and the world was still beautiful because we are all ordinary and nothing matters. There are no solutions and no one has an answer, but for once I was okay with that. The book was not a hagiography of the band. The recollections are mainly f The Replacements. I am very fortunate to have seen them at one of their reunion gigs at Riot Fest in Denver 2013. The performance changed my life. I wasn't the overweight and underwhelmed with life 40 year old; for about two solid hours I was young and alive, and the world was still beautiful because we are all ordinary and nothing matters. There are no solutions and no one has an answer, but for once I was okay with that. The book was not a hagiography of the band. The recollections are mainly from associates and fans of the band during their entire career. There is not a lot of salacious gossip, and the people tended to treat the band in realistic terms warts and all. The Replacements would never make it as a band if they formed today. The market wouldn't take their antics. It was pretty clear from the book that the band had more than a few 'off' nights, and only by seeing them several times did you really get a since of their musical ability. (Fortunately I saw them on a good night!) Through changes in lineup and management we heard about it all. The Replacement's much hyped 'rivalry' with Husker Du is talked about. The personal relationships within the band aren't really discussed at length, nor are their relationships with their wives/girlfriends ever really cogently expressed in the text. My main complaint about the book is the choppiness of the format. The lack of timeline and clarification about certain people; and why they were important to the band. The little Who's Who at the end...left me.... Unsatisfied.

  4. 4 out of 5

    George Bradford

    In 1983 in Austin, Texas my path crossed the path of four guys from Minneapolis. I was 18 years old. And, after that night, as the cliché goes, nothing would ever be the same. I was totally unprepared for The Replacements. And, yet, in retrospect, everything in my life had been leading me to that encounter. The early 1980s were bleak times for me. Lennon was gone, Reagan was president, the music on the radio was insufferably lame, childhood was over and adulthood was imminent. Just when it appe In 1983 in Austin, Texas my path crossed the path of four guys from Minneapolis. I was 18 years old. And, after that night, as the cliché goes, nothing would ever be the same. I was totally unprepared for The Replacements. And, yet, in retrospect, everything in my life had been leading me to that encounter. The early 1980s were bleak times for me. Lennon was gone, Reagan was president, the music on the radio was insufferably lame, childhood was over and adulthood was imminent. Just when it appeared things couldn’t get any worse, here came The Replacements! Blasting out of Minnesota with a reckless attitude, ferocious sound and incredible songs, they laid waste to everything in their path. The Replacements were nothing less than the future of rock and roll. And I wanted as much of that future as I could get. Of course, they burned too bright, too hot and too fast to last very long. The brilliant ones always do. And the heartbreaking end came way too soon. But when they glowed -- oh, man – when they glowed, they lit up everything. Everything! When I saw Jim Walsh’s ‘biography’ on The Replacements at my local book store, there was no hesitation in buying it. This band was that important. And their story demanded to be documented in a book. Scratch that. Their story demands to be documented in as many books as possible. So, here was the first one: Jim Walsh’s “oral history” of the band. To be honest, I had a tough time with the format. This is not a narrative tale of what happened from start to finish. This is a sting of quotes from dozens of individuals who may or may not have been there and may or may not actually recall what actually happened. Artistically, this is an effective way to convey the story. But it’s not always easy to read. And if you don’t know the history of the band you’ll probably be lost. The quotes are almost always completely out of context. And as for these ‘eyewitness accounts’, I don’t doubt the words of Peter Buck or Peter Jesperson. But the rest of the cast of characters is suspect. Paul Westerberg allegedly ‘helped’ but insisted it be published as an ‘unauthorized’ account. Christopher Mars and Tommy Stinson did not participate in the book at all. Three hundred pages in to book, I was feeling pretty disappointed. But then Walsh redeemed his book and made it an indispensible text for anyone who ever cared about The Replacements. His account of Bob Stinson’s life and final days is wrenching. And the eulogy he wrote (and read) at Bob’s memorial (reprinted in full here) is one of the greatest strings of words I’ve ever read. That alone makes this book essential. Hopefully additional books will be written about The Replacements. Their story deserves to be preserved for future generations of students. But until then, Jim Walsh’s book blazes the trail for others to follow. And for that, fans of this band, can be grateful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    matt

    A lot of the reviews here compare this to "Please Kill Me" since both are oral histories of rock bands within the (relative) same time period but "All Over but the Shouting" utilizes this writing style to its benefit (an appropriately narrow focus) instead of something as broad as Punk in the 70s. All the major players are here (most of the times culled from earlier interviews, however) and Walsh puts the puzzle pieces together just as nicely, if not better, than Azerrad did in "Our Band Could B A lot of the reviews here compare this to "Please Kill Me" since both are oral histories of rock bands within the (relative) same time period but "All Over but the Shouting" utilizes this writing style to its benefit (an appropriately narrow focus) instead of something as broad as Punk in the 70s. All the major players are here (most of the times culled from earlier interviews, however) and Walsh puts the puzzle pieces together just as nicely, if not better, than Azerrad did in "Our Band Could Be Your Life." Westerberg's self-deprecating quotes show him in rare (typical) form, proving once again that your favorite songwriter is probably an asshole. As the song goes "I want it in writing, I owe you nothing."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tony Mize

    Not really an oral history, more of a fan's scrapbook. It doesn't cover much of the Replacements' history in any depth, but it does convey, precisely and in great detail, the sensation of being on the upwards side of 40 and looking back on your 20s when finding a great band seemed like the most important thing on earth. If you're not a fan of the Replacements already, you'll think it's all a little pathetic. If you are a fan, you'll still think it's pathetic, but you won't care. Either way, chan Not really an oral history, more of a fan's scrapbook. It doesn't cover much of the Replacements' history in any depth, but it does convey, precisely and in great detail, the sensation of being on the upwards side of 40 and looking back on your 20s when finding a great band seemed like the most important thing on earth. If you're not a fan of the Replacements already, you'll think it's all a little pathetic. If you are a fan, you'll still think it's pathetic, but you won't care. Either way, chances are good you'll be entertained - I was.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Warren Truitt

    Needed more imput by Peter Jesperson and MUCH more imput from the actual members of the band. If you're gonna do an oral history, you have to concentrate on the main five or six people involved in a band's history, not just buddies who saw a few early shows or neighbors who went to school with a friend of the singer. The Replacements deserve a better bio than this, but then again, in true Replacements fashion, maybe they would get a kick out of a shitty recounting of their musical career.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I guess I should have realized what "An Oral History" meant, but there are a lot of quotes by a lot of people strung together, managing to be both repetitive and unenlightening. So I'm not finishing because life is too short and there are other books on about The Replacements out there that can be better.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    There probably is a compelling narrative in the life and music of the Replacements, but unfortunately this book doesn't find it. The oral history format is always a gamble because one is depending on the cast of characters to carry the day. This worked well in Legs McNeil and Co.'s history of Punk, "Please Kill Me," mostly because the accounts came from such a compelling group of witnesses, and the story itself had an inbred dramatic arc. But in this book, there really aren't any insightful voic There probably is a compelling narrative in the life and music of the Replacements, but unfortunately this book doesn't find it. The oral history format is always a gamble because one is depending on the cast of characters to carry the day. This worked well in Legs McNeil and Co.'s history of Punk, "Please Kill Me," mostly because the accounts came from such a compelling group of witnesses, and the story itself had an inbred dramatic arc. But in this book, there really aren't any insightful voices. Instead it's mostly over-reverent fans all saying the same things about how the band changed their lives, how drunk they were on stage, and how they deserved to be more popular. The collected stories still feel overly disjointed and the book gathers no real steam, let alone insight into what motivated the band. Maybe I expect too much of the 'Mats on this level, but if I'm going to plop down 25 bucks, the author should have made a greater effort to make the argument about the band's importance rather than rely on the words of others to carry the day.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

    An entertaining and nostalgic read. I think it could have used more squalor and gossip -- something more along the lines of Please Kill Me or Motley Crue the Dirt -- but there's lots of cool trivia and factoids to be discovered. Also the quotes from old interviews and reviews are often priceless (Westerberg on KQRS in '81: "Where is it written? Where is it written that you have to pay your dues before you [make a record]?") The story arc does take a sad trajectory, as their music gets lame, Pau An entertaining and nostalgic read. I think it could have used more squalor and gossip -- something more along the lines of Please Kill Me or Motley Crue the Dirt -- but there's lots of cool trivia and factoids to be discovered. Also the quotes from old interviews and reviews are often priceless (Westerberg on KQRS in '81: "Where is it written? Where is it written that you have to pay your dues before you [make a record]?") The story arc does take a sad trajectory, as their music gets lame, Paul sobers up, and then Bob Stinson dies (nice coverage of that here), so it all ends up a bit depressing: brace yourself. Oh: great photos too.

  11. 4 out of 5

    RandomAnthony

    I don't know. The author is both a drooling fanboy and a thief of the exact same format of "Please Kill Me: An Oral History of Punk Rock." Still, the guy did his research and the Replacements inner circle seems to trust him. You can get past the flaws if you're a fan, but you'll like this book more because you liked the band than because you liked the book. I think you know what I mean.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Phil Overeem

    Not horrible...but a lot like their seventh record Don't Tell a Soul: missing a firing piston. I much prefer the far shorter section in Michael Azerrad's fabulous This Band Could Be Your Life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Conrad Zero

    My review for "The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting" can be found here: http://www.conradzero.com/book-review... -Z My review for "The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting" can be found here: http://www.conradzero.com/book-review... -Z

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melva

    I read this to gain insight on a band I knew little about. It was well written and a quick read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tom Choi

    That guy from the Hold Steady isn't such a douche after all

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    I really wanted to read "Trouble Boys", a recent biography of Minneapolis punk band The Replacements, but the library didn't have it. I opted to get this one instead, intrigued by the idea that it was an oral history. Get the information from the horse's mouths, as it were. I'm gonna have to read "Trouble Boys" anyway, I think. And hopefully, it will be better than this one. I didn't hate it. The fact that I finished it should be proof enough of that. But I didn't feel, as I read it, that I was I really wanted to read "Trouble Boys", a recent biography of Minneapolis punk band The Replacements, but the library didn't have it. I opted to get this one instead, intrigued by the idea that it was an oral history. Get the information from the horse's mouths, as it were. I'm gonna have to read "Trouble Boys" anyway, I think. And hopefully, it will be better than this one. I didn't hate it. The fact that I finished it should be proof enough of that. But I didn't feel, as I read it, that I was learning anything new about one of my favorite bands. It's pretty lackluster. It doesn't help that the information isn't presented in any discernible order, but there's also an issue with the material presentation. Quotes and snippets of information are presented with a name of the person who said it, but it isn't clear what said person has to do with the actual band. There are also a lot of citations on quotes, revealing that the quote in question came from another book or interview and not from an actual interview with the person writing the book. It's slipshod and disorganized. And yeah. I know. It's punk rock. That's the point, right? But if I wanted disorganized, I could just put their eight albums (I'm including b-side set "All For Nothing/Nothing For All" in that count) in my CD player and hit "shuffle". I'd probably learn just as much about the band without having to Google a name to see why I should care about what they have to say about Paul Westerberg's choice of beer.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Ross

    If you like books that you can easily put down, stay far away from this one. But for the hardcore and even causal Mats fan, odds are you'll find this an entertaining and insightful read. Rather than following an author's narrative, Jim Walsh choose to tell the story through the voices of those who where connected to the Replacements (music management, rival bands or plain ol' fans) as the band went from rebellious young punks to rebellious seasoned rockers.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Dobrinski

    “They’d simultaneously crush you and charm the life out of you.” The Replacements. The Last Best Band of the ‘80s (according to Musician magazine in 1989 – a copy of which I still own to this day). The band that changed everything. In December, my friend Andy posted that he received this book for Christmas. Soon after, he mentioned reading it. Although I had a self-imposed ban on buying any new books before I finished the multiple dozen I had on hand to read, I could not resist. It was the Replace “They’d simultaneously crush you and charm the life out of you.” The Replacements. The Last Best Band of the ‘80s (according to Musician magazine in 1989 – a copy of which I still own to this day). The band that changed everything. In December, my friend Andy posted that he received this book for Christmas. Soon after, he mentioned reading it. Although I had a self-imposed ban on buying any new books before I finished the multiple dozen I had on hand to read, I could not resist. It was the Replacements after all – the one band for which I would forsake all others if told I could only take one discography with me while exiled on a desert island. I bought it on a Friday and finished reading it by Sunday (only because I went out of town on Saturday). The Replacements are one of those bands that I remember exactly when I first heard them. I was 14 years old and it was just after the release of Tim. A native Chicagoan transplanted to the Deep South at the beginning of that typical teenage angst, I was feeling doubly out of place. I looked up at the television to see a black and white video on MTV – a shoe, a speaker, a cigarette in an ashtray. The opening chords, the guttural scream, and that was it. Nothing would exist before; nothing would exist after. Since that day the Replacements have been my all-time favorite band. Ever. “Favorite for now” bands come and go. In the 1990s, I could not get enough of Pearl Jam. U2 will always be among my personal top 10, and so will Social Distortion and Fugazi. There are other bands that always make me smile. For the past six months, my latest musical obsession has been Frank Turner & the Sleeping Souls – I can listen to them on constant repeat for weeks at a time. But the Replacements will always make my heart smile. The Replacements were the only band I listened to regularly for the entire four years of high school. During that time I had the biggest crush on Tommy Stinson (and, come to think of it, on Andy, too). My friend David was just as Replacements-obsessed as I was. We had a psychology assignment to write our own obituary and David wrote his tongue-in-cheek using Replacements song titles – he was married to the “Waitress in the Sky,” etc. He once said that “Achin’ to Be” always made him think of me. At the few Replacements shows we saw in Birmingham between high school and the band’s break up, he would find me wherever I was in the crowd and put his arms around my shoulders for the duration of the song. We never dated, but I still think of him whenever I hear this song. So many things come to mind when I mention the Replacements. I own everything they released on vinyl or CD (or both). I’ve had their music used in a (successful, of course) seduction move. A guy I dated in high school gave me a Replacements CD as a birthday present when we reconnected as friends more than a decade later. Almost 30 years after hearing “Bastards of Young” for the first time, Westerberg’s words still resonate and likely will continue to do so until I get scolded by the doctors for blowing out my hearing aids by cranking up “I Hate Music.” I have seen reviews for this book say the Mats were overrated; that they don’t understand the appeal. I feel old saying this, but if you think that, you just don’t get it. Yes, the band was good – great even. But if Paul didn’t reach in and pull your heart out, if Bob’s riffs didn’t completely blow your mind, if the madness didn’t make you want them even more, this book probably isn’t for you. This book is for Replacements fans. It puts into words so many of the things the band made you think and feel about music, about life, about the world. It is like sitting around with a group of friends talking about something that, at that time in your life, was a monumental event. Take this review – I spent the first 500 words telling you what this band meant to me. These are the things I thought about while reading All Over But the Shouting. If you are a Replacements fan, I don’t know how you can NOT read this book. I’ll close this with two excerpts from the book: First, is from a story told by Peter Jesperson (the band’s first manager) about Paul Westerberg writing what would become the song “Within Your Reach.” As a writer, not only do the lyrics to this song still blow me away, but to get a glimpse into its creation is priceless. “Paul was liquored up enough so that he pulled me aside and said, ‘I gotta tell you, I wrote the best line I’ve ever written and I have to tell you what it is.’ I said, ‘What’s that?’ He said, ‘I could live without your touch if I could die within your reach.’ I stood there amongst all these people, bar people, and Suburbs people, going, ‘Wow.’” The next excerpt is about the reaction of someone hearing “Bastards of Young” for the first time. His thoughts struck a chord because this song was also my introduction to the Replacements. “Is it possible to point to the moment life starts? I can: the first seven seconds of ‘Bastards of Young.’ First that guitar, then that Howl. Rewind. Play. The guitar and then the Howl again. I felt like I was being born.” This review originally appeared at Zen Dixie, http://www.zendixie.com/read.html

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dwightfryed

    Just not a fan of this "scrapbook" style of rock memoir. Two lasting impressions after reading that are unshakeable: 1. Tommy Stinson was the heart and soul of this band. His death transformed their sound from distinctive to derivative. His antics are chronicled pretty well here. 2. Westerberg is a vicious, selfish tool. Always too cool for the room. Already knew both.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike Malaski

    Loved it. Interesting read with the story told from various, unique perspectives.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary McCoy

    It's incredibly tempting to allow this review to devolve into a shortlist of my favorite personal recollections about the Replacements. In fact, the only thing holding me back is the knowledge that everybody latches onto the same things about the Replacements, and has the same sorts of insights. I know this for a fact because I wrote an essay about them in college, before all those Replacements essays and personal narratives were easily available on the internet. I wrote the thing in a freakin' v It's incredibly tempting to allow this review to devolve into a shortlist of my favorite personal recollections about the Replacements. In fact, the only thing holding me back is the knowledge that everybody latches onto the same things about the Replacements, and has the same sorts of insights. I know this for a fact because I wrote an essay about them in college, before all those Replacements essays and personal narratives were easily available on the internet. I wrote the thing in a freakin' vacuum, and although it was judged good, and I still think it has some nice stuff in it, it sounds exactly like every other essay that has ever been written about the Replacements. Walsh's book, however, does not. Sure, there's a healthy sprinkling of stories from people whose big brothers and sisters passed down their 'Mats mix tapes, and people who saw a show or two; however, most of the book's interviews come from folks who were there, who knew the band, and who helped them along on the way up. It's a Twin Cities townie kind of book, and Walsh's interviews soak up that mid-80s so uncool it's cool Midwestern indie rock vibe that never really ended. Words from Paul, Tommy, and clearly, Bob, are clipped from previously published interviews; however, there are plenty of good bits from Chris Mars and Slim Dunlap, both of whom come across as thoughtful, diplomatic, stand-up guys. Others interviewed extensively for the book include Twin/Tone founders Peter Jesperson and Paul Stark, Soul Asylum guitarist and founder Danny Murphy, band friends and family members, and Alex Chilton, who is, oddly enough, pleasant as punch and talkative, to boot. Does the whole story get told? Of course not. It probably never will be, but All Over But the Shouting is just about everything a fan could ask of an unauthorized Replacements book. Besides, a girl's gotta have some mystery.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    For Christmas, my grampa used to get books about Minneapolis and St Paul, as it was back in the prohibition / gangster days. Back then, as the story goes, grampa paid his way through college by running booze, and as he reached his later days, he loved to read about the places he used to go, people he used to know. Holidays were always filled with stories about Kid Cann, the 1934 union riots and how gramps got sapped on the head by a cop with a nightstick. This book is like those books we’d give G For Christmas, my grampa used to get books about Minneapolis and St Paul, as it was back in the prohibition / gangster days. Back then, as the story goes, grampa paid his way through college by running booze, and as he reached his later days, he loved to read about the places he used to go, people he used to know. Holidays were always filled with stories about Kid Cann, the 1934 union riots and how gramps got sapped on the head by a cop with a nightstick. This book is like those books we’d give Gramps - full of firsthand stories (and some second hand) from people who where there at the time, a few pictures, a lot of memories. Through quotes, this book tells the story of The Replacements, their rise and fall, and to a lesser extent, the story of Minneapolis indie-music in the 1980’s. And for people who lived here then, it’s like a trip back in time to places that are either gone or slowly dimming, but still worth remembering. Or as my wife would say, “it’s like taking a ride with you through Bloomington”. All the side streets and connected parking lots the police never patrolled. Every turn, another “oh that’s where… “ My only beefs with this book are minor: the bio’s are at the back rather than with the first quote from each person, which caused me to keep flipping to the back and losing my page (having it both places would have been nice); I’d probably argue with the relevance of one or two of the folks quoted. But my biggest beef is that it made me a bit misty eyed for the old days and forced me to blow $150.00 on one of those analog-to-digital record players so I can get my molding records out of the basement and onto the iPod. I’d recommend this book to any Replacements fans, or fans of Minneapolis music post Trashmen, pre-Rhymesayers, or just music fans in general.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Rife with the heady prospect of severely meshing Facebook with Catholic domination, I ended up creating a Facebook group entitled Missals for Missiles, or M4M as they say in The City Pages. The goal of the group was as follows: Convert the duped followers of some laughable untrue religion to that of Catholicism by offering to these aforementioned followers a fair trade: From them, a series of guided missiles that have a terrain-following radar system that fly at moderate speed and low al Rife with the heady prospect of severely meshing Facebook with Catholic domination, I ended up creating a Facebook group entitled Missals for Missiles, or M4M as they say in The City Pages. The goal of the group was as follows: Convert the duped followers of some laughable untrue religion to that of Catholicism by offering to these aforementioned followers a fair trade: From them, a series of guided missiles that have a terrain-following radar system that fly at moderate speed and low altitude. To them, at no additional cost, a selection of books containing all that is said or sung at mass during the entire year. And we're not snobs over there at M4M on Facebook . What with missile being a somewhat vague term (by design mind you, our marketing department is top notch), we'll take all newcomers provided that either cruise, ballistic, or antiballistic missiles are part of the bargain. Could you imagine the Catholic Church with a cache of missiles that offer guidance in the ascent of a high-arch trajectory? How about the Catholic Church with a cache of missiles that maintain the ability to freely fall in descent? That's staying power. And that's our goal.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    A hodge podge about the life and times of the Replacements. I am a huge fan and probably won't be as critical as I would otherwise. But it is a hodge podge, reading more like running into a bunch of replacements fans in a bar and everyone is talking at once, and you're getting snippets of stories. You sort of want to know more, but at the same time you know that there is no getting to the heart or the truth of story. Capturing the story of the Replacements is like trying to catch smoke. Walsh ma A hodge podge about the life and times of the Replacements. I am a huge fan and probably won't be as critical as I would otherwise. But it is a hodge podge, reading more like running into a bunch of replacements fans in a bar and everyone is talking at once, and you're getting snippets of stories. You sort of want to know more, but at the same time you know that there is no getting to the heart or the truth of story. Capturing the story of the Replacements is like trying to catch smoke. Walsh made a valiant effort, but in parts you could tell the stories didn't quite meet up, and the narrative was coming from a different time and place. I saw it to the end, and didn't skip any parts which is saying something with the way I read rock and roll books. I admit I overlooked many of the flaws and just embraced spending time with people who seem to love my favorite band as much as I did. Full confession, I cried after I met Paul Westerberg- it was very emotional. But I also failed a philosophy exam at college after hearing Achin to Be on the radio just before. Sad, I know....

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    A very nice oral history as recalled from Minneapolis/St. Paul insiders, scene vets and other notable musicians/personalities from all over. The Replacements were a band that had to be seen live to be believed, and if you saw them live (as I did, twice) with Bob in the band it was a treat, a mess, a musical masterwork and a train moving at breakneck speed which you knew would eventually smash into something. Hard. I'm sure most interested punk rockers and other fans of this band will have alread A very nice oral history as recalled from Minneapolis/St. Paul insiders, scene vets and other notable musicians/personalities from all over. The Replacements were a band that had to be seen live to be believed, and if you saw them live (as I did, twice) with Bob in the band it was a treat, a mess, a musical masterwork and a train moving at breakneck speed which you knew would eventually smash into something. Hard. I'm sure most interested punk rockers and other fans of this band will have already picked this up, but if not I say it's well worth a read. Quite even-handed, never too high on the praise (though it is heaped on a bit) and realistic about the problems this band worked through during a wonderful career. The first five records are all essential listening for fans of melodic punk/rock/garage/folk/pop music ('Sorry, Ma, Forgot To Take Out The Trash', 'Stink', 'Let It Be', 'Hootenanny' and 'Tim'), and while the later recordings do have some charm and great songs they are nowhere in the same zip code as the first five. If this band is new to you I highly recommend checking out this book and their music. -Kenny Nonymous

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hamish

    Well, it's an oral history of one of my favorite bands who also happen to have a really interesting back-story and mystique, so it's already got that in its corner. It's kind of padded though, take out the preface and introduction and the epilogue and the pictures and all the sources at the back it's probably only about 150 pages. Plus it didn't seem like any of the band members (except Slim) were interviewed for the book, so all their quotes come from elsewhere which kind of detracts from the i Well, it's an oral history of one of my favorite bands who also happen to have a really interesting back-story and mystique, so it's already got that in its corner. It's kind of padded though, take out the preface and introduction and the epilogue and the pictures and all the sources at the back it's probably only about 150 pages. Plus it didn't seem like any of the band members (except Slim) were interviewed for the book, so all their quotes come from elsewhere which kind of detracts from the intimacy of it. Plus that causes there to be a constant switching between past and present tense which is awkward. The bit at the end though, about Bob's death, is really well done and poignant. Probably not worth it for the casual fan, but if you love your Replacements (and how can you not?), definitely pick it up. P.S. They could probably have given this the sub-title "Paul Westerberg is a humongous dick". Dunno if the author had an ax to grind or that's how all his quotes really sound, but Jesus does he come off like an asshole.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alex Orr

    To a very large degree, how much you enjoy this book directly correlates with how much you love the Replacements. That may seem obvious, but there are many music books that work on multiple levels outside of simply appealing solely to the initiated fan...and this book isn't one of those. Yes, there are some bits about the larger Minneapolis scene as well as the indie underground of the '80s, but as a whole, this is a series of loving recollections tracing the specific history of the 'Mats. If yo To a very large degree, how much you enjoy this book directly correlates with how much you love the Replacements. That may seem obvious, but there are many music books that work on multiple levels outside of simply appealing solely to the initiated fan...and this book isn't one of those. Yes, there are some bits about the larger Minneapolis scene as well as the indie underground of the '80s, but as a whole, this is a series of loving recollections tracing the specific history of the 'Mats. If you're a die-hard fan, you will love it, but if you aren't, my guess is that it will quickly begin to sound repetitive and never really quite explain why you should care so much about this band and their music. I suppose that seemingly apparent limitation might warrant a lower number of stars, but, again, the audience for this book is pretty well-defined, and that audience WILL really enjoy Walsh's book, whereas if you're not in the intended audience...well...go give the albums another listen ;)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Jon Bon Jovi: "How can the Replacements be the best band of the 80s when I've never even heard of them?" Peter Buck [quoting Paul]: "Uh, Peter? You might want to throw everything out of the refrigerator. Bob's been opening up all of the condiments and pissing in them everywhere we stay." Tommy was 12 when the band started, would drink tons of coffee and wear ankle weights all day before a show so he could jump more and higher, and he dropped out of 10th grade to go on tour (at which time his Mom m Jon Bon Jovi: "How can the Replacements be the best band of the 80s when I've never even heard of them?" Peter Buck [quoting Paul]: "Uh, Peter? You might want to throw everything out of the refrigerator. Bob's been opening up all of the condiments and pissing in them everywhere we stay." Tommy was 12 when the band started, would drink tons of coffee and wear ankle weights all day before a show so he could jump more and higher, and he dropped out of 10th grade to go on tour (at which time his Mom made their manager his legal guardian). Steve Albini comes off like an asshole, Paul as pretty difficult, Slim Dunlap as a good guy in a bad spot, and the Midwest as a place you can't really understand from the outside (Paul and Chris went to Catholic school!?!?! Paul never left the state until they went on tour!?!?). They wrote Color Me Impressed, I Will Dare, and Swinging Party, and Bob died of natural causes from drinking, etc. at the age of 35. Unreal. Walsh's framing is a little overwrought, but most of the oral history stuff is priceless and judiciously curated.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Like the Pixies, I discovered the Replacements after they had broken up. In high school they were my favorite band, along with R.E.M. I missed their rambunctious early days (I was 5 when Sorry Ma came out) and was only fortunate to catch Paul solo a few times. In any rate I recently made plans to see the reunited 'Mats (Paul and Tommy) play in Boston this fall, and Jim Walsh's oral history seemed a great way to prepare, especially for a late blooming fan like me. The oral history seems like the Like the Pixies, I discovered the Replacements after they had broken up. In high school they were my favorite band, along with R.E.M. I missed their rambunctious early days (I was 5 when Sorry Ma came out) and was only fortunate to catch Paul solo a few times. In any rate I recently made plans to see the reunited 'Mats (Paul and Tommy) play in Boston this fall, and Jim Walsh's oral history seemed a great way to prepare, especially for a late blooming fan like me. The oral history seems like the best form to capture the 'Mats, to distill the influence they had through the '80s and beyond. Slim Dunlap and Peter Jespersen provide a lot of great insights on the band, especially on Bob Stinson and Paul. I've always felt that the 'Mats are one of the great unappreciated bands - most young people don't really know them - yet they had as much influence on music the last 20 years as the Pixies. If you don't know the 'Mats I recommend checking out their seminal album Let It Be, and picking up this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Alexander

    I finally caught the Replacements two weeks ago here in Philly. Let it Be and Tim may be my two favorite albums the 80s, but I was confused by how lame they were live. I could not agree more with Joe Henry's assessment from thirty years ago: "They irritated me that night the same way they would every time I saw them over the next five years or so...always hoping to see them pull the cork out of one of the really good bottles they were clearly hoarding and let those great songs unfurl...I knew the I finally caught the Replacements two weeks ago here in Philly. Let it Be and Tim may be my two favorite albums the 80s, but I was confused by how lame they were live. I could not agree more with Joe Henry's assessment from thirty years ago: "They irritated me that night the same way they would every time I saw them over the next five years or so...always hoping to see them pull the cork out of one of the really good bottles they were clearly hoarding and let those great songs unfurl...I knew they were a great band but I knew as well they'd never assume that as a public posture. Better to fall off the face of the earth with your chuck Taylor's on than have to live up to the responsibility of being good. Then you might have to keep being good and who needs the trouble? Funny that I still managed to care enough about them as a band to feel hurt when they wouldn't honor their potential." The shocking thing is that many of their most ardent fans agree, and will sit through nine bad shows to catch them the tenth time when they actually show up.

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