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The Second World War: A Complete History xviii, 846 pp. "Gilbert charts week by week, month by month, the development and horror of a war in which more than 46 million people perished. In this history of a global war, the author weaves together all aspects - political, diplomatic, military and civilian. Heroes from all nations - soldiers, sailors and airmen, statesmen and r The Second World War: A Complete History xviii, 846 pp. "Gilbert charts week by week, month by month, the development and horror of a war in which more than 46 million people perished. In this history of a global war, the author weaves together all aspects - political, diplomatic, military and civilian. Heroes from all nations - soldiers, sailors and airmen, statesmen and resistance fighters are remembered and their stories put in the context of the wider struggle."Keywords: MARTIN GILBERT SECOND WORLD WAR WWII WW2 COMPLETE HISTORY MILITARY


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The Second World War: A Complete History xviii, 846 pp. "Gilbert charts week by week, month by month, the development and horror of a war in which more than 46 million people perished. In this history of a global war, the author weaves together all aspects - political, diplomatic, military and civilian. Heroes from all nations - soldiers, sailors and airmen, statesmen and r The Second World War: A Complete History xviii, 846 pp. "Gilbert charts week by week, month by month, the development and horror of a war in which more than 46 million people perished. In this history of a global war, the author weaves together all aspects - political, diplomatic, military and civilian. Heroes from all nations - soldiers, sailors and airmen, statesmen and resistance fighters are remembered and their stories put in the context of the wider struggle."Keywords: MARTIN GILBERT SECOND WORLD WAR WWII WW2 COMPLETE HISTORY MILITARY

30 review for The Second World War: A Complete History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    As with all of Martin Gilbert's works, this is an accomplished and polished history of World War II, looking both from a bird's eye view of events, to a closer more intimate picture of so many of those involved. It details the war in Europe, from the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1939, to then effects of the War even today. The millitary conflict, is set against the backdrop of the genocide by the Nazis of millions of Jews, Gypsies, Poles, Russians , Serbs, 'anti-social elements' and others. Even befo As with all of Martin Gilbert's works, this is an accomplished and polished history of World War II, looking both from a bird's eye view of events, to a closer more intimate picture of so many of those involved. It details the war in Europe, from the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1939, to then effects of the War even today. The millitary conflict, is set against the backdrop of the genocide by the Nazis of millions of Jews, Gypsies, Poles, Russians , Serbs, 'anti-social elements' and others. Even before the war, Hitler had boasted that the result of the war, would be the total destruction of European Jewry In response to Hitler's persecution of the Jews, Dr Chaim Weizmann, the elder statesman of the Zionist movement, wrote to the British Prime Minister, to declare that the Jews would fight on the side of the democracies against Nazi Germany- his letter was published in The Times on September 6. The human cost is recorded in harrowing detail. On September 25, the Germans launched Operation Coast. a massive air attack on Warsaw, which dropped a total of seventy incendiary tons on the Polish capital. A Polish officer's wife, Jadwiga Sosnkowska, who later escaped to the West recalled the horrors of that night. Also recorded by Gilbert was the bombing of Belgrade, in which 17 000 civillians were killed in one day. Gilbert covers the Soviet connivance in the rape of Poland, and quotes from a variety of sources on the holocaust, such as the diaries of Chaim Kaplan and Emanuel Ringleblum. The power of the German occupation authorities to tyrannize through hunger, fear and terror was unlimited. We can take inspiration from the words of Winston Churchill to the members of his new government: 'You ask what is our policy? I will say it is to wage war by sea, land and air, with all our might, and with all the strength that G-D can give us; to wage war against a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark, lamentable catalogue of human crime.' Roosevelt also gave us some wisdom on how to deal with totalitarian states by 'resistance, not appeasement'. There were always propagandists for Nazi Germany and her agression, such as the propagandist William Joyce, known as Lor Haw Haw, who broadcast pro-Axis messages from Radio Bremen, into Britain. Gilbert covers antisemitic filth, which has poured from Nazi faucets, which made the holocaust possible, indeed moral denigration encourages physical elimination. 'Even the world of film and entertainment had been dragooned to serve the cause of race hatred.' This is mirrored in the propaganda against the Jews of Israel, by the extreme Left, the international media, the United Nations, much of the European Union, the Non-Aligned Movement, Third World regimes, universities and leftist academics. The book highlights heros such as the Jewish volunteers from the Land of Israel- Peretz Rosenberg, Hannah Szenes , Enzo Sereni, French heros such as Jean Moulin, British heros such as Noor Inayat Khan, Norwegian heros such as Arne Dahl, and those brave Germans who opposed the Nazis such as Hans Scholl, his sister Sophie Scholl of the White Rose, Pastor Niemoller, Bernhard Letterhaus and Gertrude Seele. Also villains such as Himmler, Eichmann, Mengele, Stroop , Hans Frank, the Mufti Haj Amin El Husseini and The scale of human cruelty is mindblowing. Even after it was clear that all was over for Hitler and the Nazis, 20 Jewish children were hung on Hitler's birthday, ranging in age from five to twelve years. The basic message of remembering thse events is that totalitarian evil must be fought without quarter, and that the forces of good must never surrender.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anders

    Wow! What a terrible, horrific, bloody, incomprehensible, period of world history. The book gives almost a day by day account from the war's beginning, with the military/racial conquests of Nazi Germany, to the long lasting effects years later. It really re-defines what human beings are possible of, from the extremes of unthinkable brutality, and lack of conscience and respect for human life, to the amazing perseverance of people of many races, and from many countries, facing unthinkable pain, l Wow! What a terrible, horrific, bloody, incomprehensible, period of world history. The book gives almost a day by day account from the war's beginning, with the military/racial conquests of Nazi Germany, to the long lasting effects years later. It really re-defines what human beings are possible of, from the extremes of unthinkable brutality, and lack of conscience and respect for human life, to the amazing perseverance of people of many races, and from many countries, facing unthinkable pain, loss, and odds. An amazing overview of the whole conflict, I would recommend this book to everyone, to bring to light what this huge part of our recent history was about, the sacrifices and trials involved, and to gain from it, knowledge that might help inform our opinions and about right and wrong, what is morally acceptable, both in life, and in current conflicts, and issues that we have a say in. There were many times during Hitler's rise to power, where situations could have been turned, and years of strife, been avoided. Hitler preyed upon people's fears, promoted hate, and justified morally unthinkable acts in the name of a political and racial ideology. It's sad to see people today, promoting causes in the same ways. Why can't we learn? There are a couple quotes that have stuck with me, ones that ring true in current politics, both in the nationally, and internationally, that I think speak volumes about the WWII era, as well as current times: “The great mass of people will more easily fall victim to a big lie than to a small one.” --Adolf Hitler -- “All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.” --Hermann Goering--

  3. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Gilbert does a great job with an extremely difficult subject. He is factual but not graphic. And yet the horrors of this war are practically endless. Millions upon millions of lives. Ironically we finished on the 71st anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. July 6, 2016: This was an excellent if sobering listening choice for dear husband and myself this past July 4th weekend. It was good to recall and give thanks for the debt owed to so many for our sacred freedom. It left both of us overwhelme Gilbert does a great job with an extremely difficult subject. He is factual but not graphic. And yet the horrors of this war are practically endless. Millions upon millions of lives. Ironically we finished on the 71st anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. July 6, 2016: This was an excellent if sobering listening choice for dear husband and myself this past July 4th weekend. It was good to recall and give thanks for the debt owed to so many for our sacred freedom. It left both of us overwhelmed, certainly not for the first time, at the horrors which we human beings are capable of against each other. Lest we ever forget...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Gilbert's a very able historian of WWII and his choice to follow a strict, day by day, chronological approach was obviously very conscious, but it's also a serious flaw. I think he chose it primarily to bring out details and maintain focus on Nazi atrocities large and small, and those of the German army generally, as well as those of Imperial Japan. It works, to the point where it gets tiresome for me, and that’s because it so badly interferes with coherent historical narrative. Maybe more impor Gilbert's a very able historian of WWII and his choice to follow a strict, day by day, chronological approach was obviously very conscious, but it's also a serious flaw. I think he chose it primarily to bring out details and maintain focus on Nazi atrocities large and small, and those of the German army generally, as well as those of Imperial Japan. It works, to the point where it gets tiresome for me, and that’s because it so badly interferes with coherent historical narrative. Maybe more importantly, it contributes to this preposterously subtitled “complete” history of the war having large gaps in important areas. The battles for Stalingrad and St. Petersburg, for example, are so chopped up that it’s hard to pull the disparate pieces together. But they’re nevertheless covered reasonably well; we’re never told how and when German forces got into Italy, in what numbers, formations, with what materiel, etc. The Pacific war is particularly chopped up, and you’ll have to go elsewhere to get any clarity or detail about what was happening on the east Asian mainland. To be fair, Gilbert certainly knew the weaknesses inherent in his approach and he surely chose it knowingly. It is too easy to think of the Holocaust as an abstraction, and a sanitized one, and to use that abstraction to avoid thinking about its true horrors, about the very human depths of evil involved, and about all the other atrocities and evils that weren’t part of the plan to eliminate European Jewry. Apparently, cutting through this tendency was Gilbert’s first, second and third priority. He probably succeeded, but that precluded producing a good history of the war. For me, that’s unfortunate. The book has its place, and a valuable one, but it misrepresents itself. It probably should have let the context of the war be more of a background to the book’s primary focus, allowing the author to both focus more on the atrocities and not pretend to be presenting a solid history of the war. I wouldn’t suggest this book to anyone who hasn’t read a couple other good histories of WWII. As a footnote, it does have many very good maps, which similar books often don’t have.

  5. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    Part 1 of The Second World War consists of Chapters 1 through 27 of Martin Gilbert’s complete book of the same name. It brings the reader up to November 1942 with Operation Torch, the Allied landing in Tunisia, the largest amphibious landing ever to date and the failure of the German Army to take Stalingrad which gave the Allied peoples everywhere so much hope. Gilbert’s book is almost a day-by-day chronology of the war. Hearing of the loss of so much life, the inhuman brutality perpetrated in t Part 1 of The Second World War consists of Chapters 1 through 27 of Martin Gilbert’s complete book of the same name. It brings the reader up to November 1942 with Operation Torch, the Allied landing in Tunisia, the largest amphibious landing ever to date and the failure of the German Army to take Stalingrad which gave the Allied peoples everywhere so much hope. Gilbert’s book is almost a day-by-day chronology of the war. Hearing of the loss of so much life, the inhuman brutality perpetrated in the name of who-knows-what becomes a bit mind numbing. Listening to it, one begins to wonder-if it happened before, what, or who is to stop it from happening again? May 26, 2016: We have admired how far-reaching and universal Martin Gilbert’s narrative has been. He smoothly transitions from the thousands killed to the individual nightmare atrocity to the political machinations from country to country keeping our interest throughout. Continuing on... May 6, 2016: Martin Gilbert was the official biographer of Winston Churchill. Having lived in the UK for four years I confess to being partial to British history. Dear husband and I are listening to this when we have the time. So much better than the telie.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Luís

    More than 70 years after the most devastating conflict in the history of humankind, with the macabre procession of 40 million dead, it continues to be the object of study and analysis, in which rationalize such a carnage, which should not forget. In this memorialist and rationalizing effort, Martin Gilbert, famous for Winston Churchill's monumental biography, takes a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to that conflict. The book, impeccably written, contains essential documentation - maps, More than 70 years after the most devastating conflict in the history of humankind, with the macabre procession of 40 million dead, it continues to be the object of study and analysis, in which rationalize such a carnage, which should not forget. In this memorialist and rationalizing effort, Martin Gilbert, famous for Winston Churchill's monumental biography, takes a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to that conflict. The book, impeccably written, contains essential documentation - maps, diagrams and photographs - to see the evolution of war.

  7. 4 out of 5

    R.F. Gammon

    Somehow, I read this entire book in about two months. 53 chapters and 750 or so pages. It was a lot. When I first started, I didn't think I was going to be able to make it. I knew I couldn't quit, because this was a school book...but at the same time, I was pretty sure there was no way I could keep on. Not with the weight of human depravity being thrown at me with every page and paragraph and line. The Second World War was, throughout, less a war of battles and more one of mass destruction everyw Somehow, I read this entire book in about two months. 53 chapters and 750 or so pages. It was a lot. When I first started, I didn't think I was going to be able to make it. I knew I couldn't quit, because this was a school book...but at the same time, I was pretty sure there was no way I could keep on. Not with the weight of human depravity being thrown at me with every page and paragraph and line. The Second World War was, throughout, less a war of battles and more one of mass destruction everywhere and largely that of innocent civilians. Millions and millions of these died, and the stories of their ends is heartrending to read but impossible to look away from. This is not an easy book, either in reading level or brutality level. It is a brilliantly written book, one that gives insight into all the leaders on all sides of the war. As a history of the brutality that was the Second World War I'd recommend it in a heartbeat. If you're just looking for an interesting history lesson, however, this would not be the place to start. "The unfinished business of the Second World War is human pain," says the epilogue to this book, and that is the truth. This was a war of pain. So much pain. Never again...and what we know will help us to avoid letting something of this scale happen again. Learn of the Holocaust. Learn of the occupation of Poland, of the destruction of Russia, of the torture of prisoners of war. It's brutal and violent and heartrending. It makes us question humanity. But it is needed. This was a bit of a brain-dump...but I have many thoughts after reading this book. If you stuck around, thank you. This isn't exactly a review like I normally do, but it's my honest thoughts.

  8. 5 out of 5

    S.

    nearly 1000 pages, constitutes a "complete history" indeed. battle by battle action interspliced with the atrocities committed at the same time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kalyn✨

    “For those civilians who were fortunate to survive privation, deportation and massacre, similar scars, physical, mental and spiritual, remained—and still remain—to torment them. The greatest unfinished business of the Second World War is human pain.” I came into this book with absolute ignorance. I only took Canadian history in school, so I didn't know much about WWII and had always assumed it was only toward Jewish people. Martin Gilbert does an excellent job explaining the horrors o “For those civilians who were fortunate to survive privation, deportation and massacre, similar scars, physical, mental and spiritual, remained—and still remain—to torment them. The greatest unfinished business of the Second World War is human pain.” I came into this book with absolute ignorance. I only took Canadian history in school, so I didn't know much about WWII and had always assumed it was only toward Jewish people. Martin Gilbert does an excellent job explaining the horrors of one of the most devastating events in history, and how it changed, and ended, the lives of many people. Gilbert covers nearly everything, from the very first victim of the war, to the effect the war has on people nearly 50 years later. I wish he delved into certain topics a bit more, and some a little less, but it was a very haunting and terrifying view on what hatred can lead to.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Deal

    This is a good, and informative book. Well researched. This book may not be for everyone as it is peppered with a lot of the atrocities done during the war. Some of them will pull you away from the rest of this book and this telling of history. Some can be quite jarring.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Gilbert's history of world war 2 should be the first choice of anyone not only interested in the military campaigns but also in the social atmosphere of the times. He is amazing in his ability and willingness to blend the two into this amazing narrative of possibly the largest human undertaking in history. I was enthralled from beginning to end. The story really comes alive. The refreshing thing is that it's not just told through the stories of the big names that we all know, much of it is seen Gilbert's history of world war 2 should be the first choice of anyone not only interested in the military campaigns but also in the social atmosphere of the times. He is amazing in his ability and willingness to blend the two into this amazing narrative of possibly the largest human undertaking in history. I was enthralled from beginning to end. The story really comes alive. The refreshing thing is that it's not just told through the stories of the big names that we all know, much of it is seen from the perspective of everyday folks like you and me caught up in the whirlwind. An impressive work through and through. If you are looking for a more strictly military history of the war try John Keegan's book by the same name.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Walter Mendoza

    Martin Gilbert's book of the Second World War is one of the best books about WWII, an detailed account of the camps of battle, with a vivid descriptions of concentrations camps, maybe is not analitical book, but he describes many facts of the conflict, the murderers of jews in Lithuania or Russian front. One book well documented and written, definitively an interesting overview of the WWII. I recommend this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Braedy

    It is no small feat to sum up a book in a few short words, but this book does not present that problem - Amazing and Haunting. Gilbert removes the layers of history that we've all been accustomed to, and delves into the accounts of individuals, showing us the atrocities that have gone untold. An absolutely amazing read, and absolutely haunting.

  14. 4 out of 5

    William Glover

    This book about the complete Second World War is, a worthy addition to the mountains of books that have come before it. I would of given 5*, I really would of done but, there is problem I know the Author is Jewish and he talks about in great detail the holocaust which is fine but he goes on about so frequently it gets annoying, it sounds bad but it is true I’m sorry to say.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    A difficult, but important work of the history of World War Two. On the positive side, the author spends a large amount of time detailing the atrocities that occurred to the Jewish population of Europe. Week by week, in mind numbing details he follows the Nazi program to eliminate the Jewish population from Europe. It is difficult to read, difficult to understand and difficult to realize that people could possibly be so cruel. It is important that we try to do so. As a history of the events of th A difficult, but important work of the history of World War Two. On the positive side, the author spends a large amount of time detailing the atrocities that occurred to the Jewish population of Europe. Week by week, in mind numbing details he follows the Nazi program to eliminate the Jewish population from Europe. It is difficult to read, difficult to understand and difficult to realize that people could possibly be so cruel. It is important that we try to do so. As a history of the events of the war, it falls short - there didn't appear to be much regarding the strategy of the war, the marching out the events one after another gives the reader a window in which to peer through regarding the war on all fronts, but the overarching issues and strategy were never really discussed. The author also spends much time on the European theatre of the war, almost forgetting all the other fronts, particularly the war in the Pacific.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Extensive history of WWII. Gilbert covers the breadth and depth of the conflict, though I think he does not give the Asian theatre full coverage. I appreciated the chronological approach, and appreciated how challenging 1942 and 1943 were as the war was turning against the Axis powers but unevenly. Also learnt more about Rommel, a true master general. Gilbert was sensitive outlining the Nazi's "Final Solution" to destroy Jewish populations in Europe. He states how long it took for the Allies to u Extensive history of WWII. Gilbert covers the breadth and depth of the conflict, though I think he does not give the Asian theatre full coverage. I appreciated the chronological approach, and appreciated how challenging 1942 and 1943 were as the war was turning against the Axis powers but unevenly. Also learnt more about Rommel, a true master general. Gilbert was sensitive outlining the Nazi's "Final Solution" to destroy Jewish populations in Europe. He states how long it took for the Allies to understand what was happening - and then why the Soviets and Americans saw action against the camps as not central to their immediate war goals. I am glad I read this after visit Normandy and the D-Day beaches. True masterpiece.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Allan

    After reading this colossal account of the biggest, bloodiest conflict in history, you will want to compare every other book on the subject to it and you will fail. Martin Gilbert is one of the only historic authors who have ever been successful in conveying the massive scale of the genocide, industry' politicking, material destruction and general complexity of the second world war to the reader. This book was the only one that ever managed to scare the shit out of me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This book seemed to focus on every detail of violence that occurred during the war. I did not finish it because I am more interested in finding a book that deals primarily with the motivations and strategies on a broader scale.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Koloze

    During the coronavirus pandemic, learn what Nazis and the Democratic Party have in common. The parallels between Nazi oppression of Europe and Democratic Party oppression of the United States become obvious on reading Martin Gilbert’s mammoth history of World War II. While I originally wanted to learn more about the Nazi oppression of European nations only, imperialist policies of fascist Italy and imperial Japan reinforced several ideas about how dictatorships not only suppress, but eventually ki During the coronavirus pandemic, learn what Nazis and the Democratic Party have in common. The parallels between Nazi oppression of Europe and Democratic Party oppression of the United States become obvious on reading Martin Gilbert’s mammoth history of World War II. While I originally wanted to learn more about the Nazi oppression of European nations only, imperialist policies of fascist Italy and imperial Japan reinforced several ideas about how dictatorships not only suppress, but eventually kill freedom-loving people. Of course, Nazi actions in Europe parallel the policies of the Democratic Party in the United States, so reading a dated history of World War II is still relevant. Besides that, the 747 pages of text—and many full-page maps and photos—are sure to occupy time well spent indoors during the coronavirus pandemic. Some of the parallels between Nazis and Democratic politicians are obvious. First is the dominant Nazi belief that there is some human life which is not worth living. For Nazis, it was Jews, the Roma people (Gypsies), Slavs, and others (homosexuals and mentally ill persons). Democrats, similarly, despise the unborn, the handicapped newborn, and the elderly. That’s why their policies endorse abortion legal throughout the nine months of pregnancy for any reason whatsoever, infanticide (the killing of handicapped newborns), and euthanasia (the killing of the elderly and denial of care to medically-vulnerable senior citizens). Second are the means which Nazis used and Democratic politicians use to obtain and maintain political power. For Nazis, terror and violence were the order of the day. For Democrats, much the same, although the terror is usually masked in ad hominem and politically-correct attacks against their opponents, as when an opponent is branded as “homophobic” or “racist” when the person attacked is anything but. Sometimes, Democratic politicians endorse the practices of violent domestic terrorist groups like Antifa to intimidate law-abiding citizens. Third is the devastation which the Nazis and Democrats created. Nazi destruction of Europe is obvious; we have still photo and film documentation of the damage caused to European cities throughout their long reign of terror. The evidence of Democratic devastation is not as clear as a photo of a destroyed Warsaw, but nonetheless apparent. Democratic abortion policies, for example, have not only killed unborn children, but also harmed or killed mothers and alienated fathers. Democratic assaults on heterosexual normativity have affected the family and the importance of the husband and father in the family as much as any Nazi bomb would have destroyed an ancient European church. Gilbert’s interpolation of historical facts with countless narratives of victims of the war makes the reading of his 747 pages suspenseful and powerfully emotional. Although we know how the “story” ends (the Nazis lose, and Western civilization is saved from a vicious totalitarian threat), we do not know the specific facts of how Europe saved itself from Nazi oppression. Gilbert supplies those facts and relates painful episodes of people killed by the Nazis. Similarly, while we know the horrors of Democratic policies attacking human life, what is not so clear is whether we twenty-first century people have learned anything from Nazi oppression of Jewish and Christian (Western) civilization. One could answer “obviously not” since the policies of the Democratic Party in the United States are as oppressive as Nazi ideology yet are still endorsed by hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of Americans who align themselves with that party. One can only hope that Americans will reject Democrats’ Nazi-like policies and practices in November’s elections.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John Dembowski

    A solid overview of the war from start to finish. The author practically went day by day, inserting little vignettes of both horror and heroism. What amazed me at first was the toll of human lives this war took. I was distraught by the thousands of civilian lives lost in London as Britain held out against Germany alone. But as time went on, the casualty numbers and statistics would skyrocket. Where at the beginning of the book I was upset by thousands losing their lives, by the end I was unphase A solid overview of the war from start to finish. The author practically went day by day, inserting little vignettes of both horror and heroism. What amazed me at first was the toll of human lives this war took. I was distraught by the thousands of civilian lives lost in London as Britain held out against Germany alone. But as time went on, the casualty numbers and statistics would skyrocket. Where at the beginning of the book I was upset by thousands losing their lives, by the end I was unphased by the loss of hundreds of thousands or millions. The statistics of this war are truly mindnumbing, and only through exploring further personal stories and eyewitness accounts can one recapture the human element, and therefore the empathy that so easily gets lost in statistics. A side note that this book hasn't really been updated since 1989. While this generally did not cause much of an issue, there was one instance where the author mentioned the Polish politician, Ignacy Jan Paderewski. The author mentioned that he died in the US in 1941, and that he would be buried in the US until Poland was free again. The author then said he was still interred in the US to this day. Turns out, his body was returned to Poland in 1992. My point being that this being written before the fall of the USSR has a limited perspective on some aspects of the war's effects.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Akin

    About as comprehensive account as you could ask for. Light on analysis, context. More of a global daily diary from 1939 to 1945. But this is a history that does not stint from lots of details about the daily horrors of the Holocaust. The Holocaust is not a separate chapter in this 1,000 page book. It is present on just about every page. That is an important, valuable difference versus many other histories which focus on forces under arms.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tiago Gala

    Thorough account of the 2nd world war. Some details are over explored while some other important events are skipped. The writing tends to use the same stylistic forms, which makes for a boring and difficult to follow read. Also, the book doesn’t explain the motivations behind the war and instead focus almost exclusively on accounts of the killings. It is very focused on a British and North-American perspective.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Narayanan

    Concidentally I finished reading this book on the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. This book really is a magnum opus on WWII. Its 15 pages of bibliography points to the amount of research that has gone into its making. A must read for anyone who is interested in the big picture of WWII

  24. 5 out of 5

    vibhor nigam

    A detailed account of the events which happened during the second world war and how it progressed. The book gives in details the facts rather than presenting an opinionated view. A good start point for anyone who wants to learn the history of second world war in detail

  25. 5 out of 5

    bob drongowski

    Very important book Very interesting, well written, hard to put down. The enormous nu,bet of peoples killed is staggering. Must never forget how the Nazis came to power. History repeats itself, so knowledge from this book is important.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vytautas

    Additional reading required I enjoyed the book very much. However it felt that a complete overview is lacking. The book lacks a deeper analysis of soviet war crimes, hence it does not pretendend that there were none.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hotrats

    In depth coverage of the entire war.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Morleymor

    A bleak reminder of the horrific events of WW2.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tom D

    Tried twice to read, stalled out both times. Little perspective offered, just a day by day WW2 almanac.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    An exhaustive read But if you want a complete understanding of an event that shaped the world we live in today - you can't do better than this.

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