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The Collected Fantasies, Vol. 4: The Long Tomorrow and Other Science Fiction Stories

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This out-of-print English translation collects The Long Tomorrow (written by Dan O'Bannon), Variation #4027 on The Theme and Is Man Good? by Jean "Moebius" Giraud.


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This out-of-print English translation collects The Long Tomorrow (written by Dan O'Bannon), Variation #4027 on The Theme and Is Man Good? by Jean "Moebius" Giraud.

30 review for The Collected Fantasies, Vol. 4: The Long Tomorrow and Other Science Fiction Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tamahome

    Woah, the art is amazing. It's on archive.org in Heavy Metal vol 1 #4 and #5. Some nudity. Inspired the city look in Bladerunner. That's the same O'Bannon that wrote Alien. You can read it in 15 minutes. I used Comic Book Lover on Mac. https://archive.org/search.php?query=... Woah, the art is amazing. It's on archive.org in Heavy Metal vol 1 #4 and #5. Some nudity. Inspired the city look in Bladerunner. That's the same O'Bannon that wrote Alien. You can read it in 15 minutes. I used Comic Book Lover on Mac. https://archive.org/search.php?query=...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    The stories in this volume are some of the most accessible of the entire series. There are no mystic experiences, no blurring of the line between reality and fiction. It's just straight up traditional science fiction. In his comments on the stories, Moebius talks about consciously aiming for the feel of the short stories appearing in Galaxy magazine, particularly those of Robert Sheckley. “The Long Tomorrow” itself is based on a comics story done by Dan O’Bannon. He and Moebius were working with The stories in this volume are some of the most accessible of the entire series. There are no mystic experiences, no blurring of the line between reality and fiction. It's just straight up traditional science fiction. In his comments on the stories, Moebius talks about consciously aiming for the feel of the short stories appearing in Galaxy magazine, particularly those of Robert Sheckley. “The Long Tomorrow” itself is based on a comics story done by Dan O’Bannon. He and Moebius were working with Alexandro Jodorowsky on the ill-fated Dune project. Since the movie was still in the concept and design phase, there wasn't much for special effects artist O’Bannon to do yet. He kept busy by drawing a comics story, intended to be a parody of the hardboiled genre, but with SF elements. Moebius’ imagination was fired up by the story, and he was given permission to do his own version. The resulting creation is a delightful fusion of science fiction and noir detective elements that appears to have been the inspiration for the look of Ridley Scott’s Bladerunner. Honestly, this volume is probably a good introduction to Moebius’ work for the uninitiated. They give you an opportunity to see his style in the service of some more conventional plots. I’m not sure I completely understand Marvel/Epic’s reasoning in ignoring the original publication order when presenting this series. Sure, Moebius has done some weird and trippy stuff, but it didn't just appear out of nowhere. His style and storytelling developed and evolved. This may be Volume 4 of the series, but many of these stories predate the ones in earlier volumes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Moebius' "The Long Tomorrow" as well as "The Incal" constitute my personal gold standard for high tech future film noir style science fiction artwork. These two comics are more or less how I imagine everything to look like in my head whenever I read Philip K. Dick, William Gibson etc. You can tell that the production designers for "Blade Runner" used this comic as a reference for what they wanted to accomplish, and understand why Moebius actually sued the makers of "The Fifth Element" for plagia Moebius' "The Long Tomorrow" as well as "The Incal" constitute my personal gold standard for high tech future film noir style science fiction artwork. These two comics are more or less how I imagine everything to look like in my head whenever I read Philip K. Dick, William Gibson etc. You can tell that the production designers for "Blade Runner" used this comic as a reference for what they wanted to accomplish, and understand why Moebius actually sued the makers of "The Fifth Element" for plagiarism. To this day, there are several things that make "The Long Tomorrow" a fresh reading experience despite how much it's been imitated. One is that instead of drawing everything in either drab grey colours, or different nuances of blue and purple, Moebius uses bright vivid colours chosen and combined on the basis of interesting compositions and sharp colour contrasts over realism. Another thing about "The Long Tomorrow" that makes it a distinct Moebius is all the work on display put into creating architectural styles, fashions and designs that fit into coherent aesthetic styles that do not quite match any existing human culture. Yet the reader still ends up feeling that this is a convincing future society, despite Moebius'. signature surrealistic sensibility. Then we have the uniquely French touches that make the result very different from UK or US or Japanese cyberpunk, eg one of the bad guys driving a hovercar that is clearly modelled on the Citroën DS, or the overall sense of absurdist humour that results in quite a few funny moments throughout the story. Speaking of the world building, Moebius conveys many of the basic details about the fictional universe just by showing instead of telling, or with an off-hand detail in the dialogue that ends up setting up a plot twist later down the road. I like how the setting for most of the story is not our Earth or even anywhere in our solar system, but instead a subterranean city on a moon in a distant solar system. This allows Moebius to really go wild with thinking up future architecture styles and design sensibilities and weird things in the story. Something he would later take even further with "The Incal", even though this one is obviously a much easier place to start.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    A powerful sci-fi small story of sixteen pages by O'Bannon (after the unsuccessful try with the cinematic adaptation of Dune he worked on Alien with Riddley Scott) and the master of science fiction, monsieur Moebius. Even in that small a size Jean Giraud manages to hide a complete world full of details and untold stories, based on the clever sci-fi noir plot by O'Bannon. "The Long Tomorrow" is a fine speciment of how the 9th art influenced (and continues to this day) a lot of movies (Blade Runne A powerful sci-fi small story of sixteen pages by O'Bannon (after the unsuccessful try with the cinematic adaptation of Dune he worked on Alien with Riddley Scott) and the master of science fiction, monsieur Moebius. Even in that small a size Jean Giraud manages to hide a complete world full of details and untold stories, based on the clever sci-fi noir plot by O'Bannon. "The Long Tomorrow" is a fine speciment of how the 9th art influenced (and continues to this day) a lot of movies (Blade Runner and Empire strikes back in this case) that later became landmarks of the genre.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is a collection of short sci-fi stories by Moebius (some are written by others). The art is really fantastic. Some of the stories are really awesome, others are just alright (predictable, but fun).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Monkey Feyerabend

    5.5/10 Can a cartoonist count among the most influential in the history of comics, while being at the same time - and without contradiction! - among the most overrated solemn charlatans of the medium? My answer is yes, as proved by this book. The volume collects short sci-fi stories drawn and mostly written by Jean 'Moebius' Giraud in the early 70's. The importance of Moebius's artistic vision and style in comics, movies and all other kinds of visual arts has been well documented in the past fifty 5.5/10 Can a cartoonist count among the most influential in the history of comics, while being at the same time - and without contradiction! - among the most overrated solemn charlatans of the medium? My answer is yes, as proved by this book. The volume collects short sci-fi stories drawn and mostly written by Jean 'Moebius' Giraud in the early 70's. The importance of Moebius's artistic vision and style in comics, movies and all other kinds of visual arts has been well documented in the past fifty years. So, it is not up to me to reiterate that aspect of the French master career. Much less discussed - I dare to say, much less acknowledged by the collective consciousness of the people interested in the language of comics - is how Moebius utterly sucked at writing stories. We must be honest, ladies and gentlemen. Of course, 'writing' is a big word here. All over his sci-fi career Giraud admittedly never put any serious effort in the conception and storytelling development of his solo stories. He rather followed a - sometimes drugs driven, sometimes meditation/new age driven - free narrative take. An approach which I am sure was pleasant and liberating for the author (and a few of his admirers back in the early 70's), but turns out to be embarrassing painful for a modern reader. As I am the first to criticise a certain unbalance in many mainstream comics in favour of the writers (of scripts in prose), I will also be the first to admit that too much of the alternative scene from the 70's and 80's - the American underground à la Robert Crumb, the French school à la Métal Hurlant, the Italian school à la Frigidaire, and so on - is so unbalanced towards the artistic side that sometimes it feels to me as totally unreadable crap. Notice that I am not even complaining here about Moebius's more 'hermetic' tales, such as The Airtight Garage or Arzach. In fact, the volume in question is a collection of quite clear short stories. It is just that these stories are based on dumb ideas. Moebius's stories were dumb. I said it. Now, I am more than happy to condone a certain lack of deepness of the plot if the execution - the narrative tricks used to tell the story - captures my interest. In the end, comics are about the how much more than the what. But Moebius storytelling was just...bah, how can I describe it? Linear, banal. Here and there even vaguely pedantic. So, let's see what we have in this book and get over with it. The Long Tomorrow is the one good story in the book. Of course it is: it was written and originally completely drawn by Dan O' Bannon. A movie guy who, among other things, wrote Alien, Total Recall and was a central figure on the set of Star Wars. Yes, that good of a writer you need to obtain sixteen interesting pages out of Moebius's sci-fi career, at least from a storytelling perspective. The Long Tomorrow is a brief noir story with a visionary atmosphere and a decent final cliffhanger. It is somehow a preview of the urban landscapes that Moebius will envision a few years later on The Incal, minus all the esoteric mumbo jumbo that Alejandro Jodorowsky will inject in the latter. It's a Small Universe is a not particularly deep reflection on the violence of human nature. Variations No. 4027 on 'the' Theme is a not particularly deep reflection on the violence of human nature, in anti-war style. Christmas in Lipponia is a not particularly deep reflection on the violence of human nature, in brutal revenge style. The artifact is the most predictable story that I have ever seen. There is a Prince Charming on Phenixon is the second most predictable story that I have ever seen. It is also quite misogynistic in an unfunny way, even for the standard of the France of the 70's, I guess. The 2-pager Split the little space pioneer is, in the words of the author himself, 'an attempt to do something funny [...], although I do not think of myself as a humorist'. Well, these 2-page gag proves that he was right on the latter sentence. Moebius seems to think that all it takes to write a short story is a cliffhanger in the final page. I mean, the man literally states that in one of his intros in this book. Fair enough. If only he was good at it! Here it only worked for me in the story Blackbeard and the Pirate Brain. Approaching Centauri is just an excuse to make Druillet draw a few of his visionary pages. Ah, yes: unlike what stated in the credits of the volume, the art in this story is by Moebius only at the beginning and at the end, while the centre is clearly by his friend and master Druillet. (For those unfamiliar with this name, Philippe Druillet was some kind of 'slightly less incensed and slightly more talented Moebius'.) The final Is Man Good? provides us at least with a definitive answer to the title longstanding ethical dilemma. I will give it that. I don't know how to conclude this rantview of mine. The art is very good, sometimes breathtaking. So, yeah, you have that. Focus on the art and do not think too much about the stories you are reading. In the end, it is what Moebius actually wanted from us all.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jemppu

    Like I said on the review of the first volume: Moebius is rather the alpha and omega of modern SF&F visualizations. Right from the beginning of this particular volume the visual similarities to Besson's Fifth Element are glaringly obvious. And then there are what seem like lone designs 'borrowed' to Star Wars: Imperial probe, Queen Amidala fashion, even a creature quite alike 'Sy Snootles' the cantina singer. The quotation marked "Art" in " "Art" par Moebius" credits definitely makes you smile Like I said on the review of the first volume: Moebius is rather the alpha and omega of modern SF&F visualizations. Right from the beginning of this particular volume the visual similarities to Besson's Fifth Element are glaringly obvious. And then there are what seem like lone designs 'borrowed' to Star Wars: Imperial probe, Queen Amidala fashion, even a creature quite alike 'Sy Snootles' the cantina singer. The quotation marked "Art" in " "Art" par Moebius" credits definitely makes you smile with sympathy to that recognizable artistic self-scrutiny.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marion

    Not at ALL what I was expecting. I thought this would be small (52 pages) story, I didn't expect it to be 8 super tiny ones. The art looks really cool. There's a spaceship at one time that I could not stop staring at.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    While nothing in this collection is essential to the canon of Jean Giraud, it's an interesting look at his minor (mostly early) works, created before he really found his groove with the Aedena cycle and The Airtight Garage. His wonderful artwork is very much present throughout these pages, making up for the largely formulaic sci-fi plots. This volume includes commentary from the author on each piece, and he notes especially the violent endings of many of these stories, something that evolved into While nothing in this collection is essential to the canon of Jean Giraud, it's an interesting look at his minor (mostly early) works, created before he really found his groove with the Aedena cycle and The Airtight Garage. His wonderful artwork is very much present throughout these pages, making up for the largely formulaic sci-fi plots. This volume includes commentary from the author on each piece, and he notes especially the violent endings of many of these stories, something that evolved into spiritual awakenings in his later work. That point highlights the raw energy that courses through this collection, a much rougher and direct approach to narrative than many readers associate with Moebius. So for the completist, this book is entirely worthwhile as part of the foundation that would lead to later and greater things from the same artist.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    A sci-fi short stories collection of the highest quality by Moebius. The spiritual meanings hidden beneath each story are vast and the complementary notes by the creator offer a unusual reading experience. It's better to read the notes after the story and then read it again, you'll see it in a different (and most of the times far more interesting) perspective. It's a pity these paperbacks by epic are so expensive and I had to resign to scanned cbrs. I'll surely continue to the other albums of th A sci-fi short stories collection of the highest quality by Moebius. The spiritual meanings hidden beneath each story are vast and the complementary notes by the creator offer a unusual reading experience. It's better to read the notes after the story and then read it again, you'll see it in a different (and most of the times far more interesting) perspective. It's a pity these paperbacks by epic are so expensive and I had to resign to scanned cbrs. I'll surely continue to the other albums of the series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    [Comics Canon Review] A collection of minor Moebius stories, some of which he drew for other writers. The eponymous story, “The Long Tomorrow,” is the best of the bunch, but it’s a story more notable for its influence on films like Blade Runner and The Fifth Element rather than for anything noteworthy in and of itself.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sebastien

    Long Day Tomorrow was top notch, heavy influence on Blade Runner so that is really neat. Otherwise I found the quality of many of the other stories to be choppy. Probably more of a 3-3.5 stars but bumping up a bit just cuz it's Moebius and you always gotta love his art. I do enjoy that this collection includes Jean Giraud's (Moebius') commentary on each piece, which stories and art turned out best and why he thought so along with his critique of where he felt certain pieces fell short. It's alwa Long Day Tomorrow was top notch, heavy influence on Blade Runner so that is really neat. Otherwise I found the quality of many of the other stories to be choppy. Probably more of a 3-3.5 stars but bumping up a bit just cuz it's Moebius and you always gotta love his art. I do enjoy that this collection includes Jean Giraud's (Moebius') commentary on each piece, which stories and art turned out best and why he thought so along with his critique of where he felt certain pieces fell short. It's always fun to see an artist of Moebius' stature analyze his own work while also offering insights to his creative process. Overall I was more impressed with The Airtight Garage which I also just recently read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Perry

    Alien screenwriter and noted John Carpenter associate Dan O'Bannon wrote this one, so of course I had to check it out. A nice, short little proto-cyberpunk comic with some killer art by Moebius and one hell of a finale. It's not the most substantial thing in the world, but damn if it isn't good.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    Alright, Giraud, that was your last chance. We're done, you and I.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Pablo Martinez

    Really nice collection of short stories by Moebius which really highlight his genius. Featuring The Long Tomorrow which was one of the main visual inspiration for my favourite movie of all time, Blade Runner.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marco Silva

    It's too short, unfortunately. The art is amazing and it's no wonder it was a visual reference to Blade Runner. Some panels are works of art... I recommend reading this short story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    The comic that started the cyberpunk genre. Not my cup of tea, but the influence on later works like Blade Runner is obvious. Definitely a must-read for fans of this genre.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    The main story is pretty dull despite its great imagery, but the assortment of short works afterwards proved to be surprisingly charming: imaginative little stories with an ironic twist.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steve Gutin

    I am really enjoying this Moebius series, which I somehow never read before.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    This volume holds a series of fantastically satisfying short stories. All of them are futuristic, original and beautifully illustrated in any style Moebius can offer.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Shehu

    The genius of Moebius is on full display in this collection. As readers we get to enjoy his distinct style of illustration and the way his approach towards storytelling and comics as a medium has changed throughout the years. While this is no Arzach, The Long Tomorrow provides us with a story that has in a way influence modern culture far more, as Moebius himself states on the importance that The Long Tomorrow has had on science fiction movies such as Star Wars(they lifted a droid off of this st The genius of Moebius is on full display in this collection. As readers we get to enjoy his distinct style of illustration and the way his approach towards storytelling and comics as a medium has changed throughout the years. While this is no Arzach, The Long Tomorrow provides us with a story that has in a way influence modern culture far more, as Moebius himself states on the importance that The Long Tomorrow has had on science fiction movies such as Star Wars(they lifted a droid off of this story), or The Blade Runner which had it as its inspiration. The rest of the stories are sublime, and all of Moebius' comments are a joy to peak into the inner workings of what is arguably the greatest sci-fi illustrator of all time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Caparo

    The Long Tomorrow is one of those stories that became pillars for many emerging creators on the 70s. It clearly marked what would become in the 80s the Ciberpunk movement with it's mix of decaying future cities, hardboiled stories and antihero characters. The chemistry between the orignal story by Dan O'Bannon and the art of Moebius is excellent. Also in this book is another of my favorite Moebius works: Is Man Good?. A comic without dialogs where Moebius displays his amazing narrative and cinema The Long Tomorrow is one of those stories that became pillars for many emerging creators on the 70s. It clearly marked what would become in the 80s the Ciberpunk movement with it's mix of decaying future cities, hardboiled stories and antihero characters. The chemistry between the orignal story by Dan O'Bannon and the art of Moebius is excellent. Also in this book is another of my favorite Moebius works: Is Man Good?. A comic without dialogs where Moebius displays his amazing narrative and cinematographic talents with a touch of humor.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Martyn Halm

    Both The Long Tomorrow (written by Dan O'Bannon) and The Incal were influential in designing the movie Blade Runner by Ridley Scott and The Fifth Element by Luc Besson. The Incal is a classic story that comes highly recommended to lovers of graphic novels and Sci-Fi buffs. Both The Long Tomorrow (written by Dan O'Bannon) and The Incal were influential in designing the movie Blade Runner by Ridley Scott and The Fifth Element by Luc Besson. The Incal is a classic story that comes highly recommended to lovers of graphic novels and Sci-Fi buffs.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt Gonzalez Kirkland

    Of Moebius's work of this era, think this general length is my favorite - the longer form ones don't work quite as well for me, but plenty of the shorter SF stories in here have a nice mix of ornate psychedelic science fictional weirdness and goofy/scuzzy/juvenile-but-mostly-charming post-underground comix stoner comedy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    The Long Tomorrow was so good. Love to see the birth of Blade Runner's inspiration and earlier work Moebius did before the storyboards for 5th Element. According to this book some of the ideas came out of the failed Dune project with Alejandro Jodorowsky; I really wish they made that a reality.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    drawn by moebius, written by dan obamon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

    Well, I can't really rate this, because the edition I have is in German. Anyways, the art is great ... and from what I could infer from that, it looked pretty good!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    A handful of good-to-forgettable stories, the standout being The Long Tomorrow. Seeing Moebius do a gag comic in an Aragones style was fun.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    the long tomorrow is the best of the bunch here, especially notable for its Star Wars and blade runner influence plus lots of weird sci fi nudity.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chips

    Two geniuses about tomorrow land.

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