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A Choice Outstanding Academic Book. A musicologist and cultural critic as well as a professional musician, Robert Walser offers a comprehensive musical, social, and cultural analysis of heavy metal in Running with the Devil. Dismissed by critics and academics, condemned by parents and politicians, fervently embraced by legions of fans, heavy metal music attracts and embodie A Choice Outstanding Academic Book. A musicologist and cultural critic as well as a professional musician, Robert Walser offers a comprehensive musical, social, and cultural analysis of heavy metal in Running with the Devil. Dismissed by critics and academics, condemned by parents and politicians, fervently embraced by legions of fans, heavy metal music attracts and embodies cultural conflicts that are central to our society. Walser explores how and why heavy metal works, both musically and socially, and at the same time uses metal to investigate contemporary formations of identity, community, gender, and power.


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A Choice Outstanding Academic Book. A musicologist and cultural critic as well as a professional musician, Robert Walser offers a comprehensive musical, social, and cultural analysis of heavy metal in Running with the Devil. Dismissed by critics and academics, condemned by parents and politicians, fervently embraced by legions of fans, heavy metal music attracts and embodie A Choice Outstanding Academic Book. A musicologist and cultural critic as well as a professional musician, Robert Walser offers a comprehensive musical, social, and cultural analysis of heavy metal in Running with the Devil. Dismissed by critics and academics, condemned by parents and politicians, fervently embraced by legions of fans, heavy metal music attracts and embodies cultural conflicts that are central to our society. Walser explores how and why heavy metal works, both musically and socially, and at the same time uses metal to investigate contemporary formations of identity, community, gender, and power.

30 review for Running with the Devil: Power, Gender and Madness in Heavy Metal Music (Music/Culture)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Martin

    This is a pioneering account of the cultural importance of heavy metal by an eminent musicologist and cultural critic, formerly one of my professors at UCLA, now at Case Western Reserve University. This book is a reworking of Walser's doctoral dissertation. Though Walser covers the history and origins of metal in the late 60s and early 70s, this book is not primarily a history. Rather, it is a critical interpretation of metal's cultural significance. Walser's writing style is exemplary in its cl This is a pioneering account of the cultural importance of heavy metal by an eminent musicologist and cultural critic, formerly one of my professors at UCLA, now at Case Western Reserve University. This book is a reworking of Walser's doctoral dissertation. Though Walser covers the history and origins of metal in the late 60s and early 70s, this book is not primarily a history. Rather, it is a critical interpretation of metal's cultural significance. Walser's writing style is exemplary in its clarity and ease of readability without sacrificing high-level intellectual theorizing, making this book accessible to a far broader readership than that usually reserved for academic texts. Though Walser is thoroughly versed in critical theory, cultural studies, feminist theory, and poststructuralism, he wears his considerable learning lightly without drawing overt attention to it. The book is divided into 5 chapters dealing with various aspects of metal, including genre, reception history, virtuosity, prestige, gender, mysticism, and, what he terms throughout, metal's constructions of "transcendence," what some critics, such as Fredric Jameson, drawing on The Frankfurt School, have termed culture's utopian strivings, its attempts to inscribe desire into utopian social forms, to create an alternative to current society. The first chapter is devoted to the emergence of metal in English lower-middle and working class culture, identifying two seminal bands and albums (Deep Purple's In Rock and Black Sabbath's debut album) as ground zero for later developments, with each tendency serving as models for later developments. Following Foucault and, more distantly, Nietzsche, Walser identifies power, metaphorically represented by the "power chord," as the most important motivator for heavy metal fans and practitioners. He emphasizes the low prestige of metal within dominant musical circles (the book was written in the early 90s), linking this with social location and (what used to be) the hegemony of classical music within the canons of high culture. Metal thus represents the construction of a cultural practice representing the assertion of agency by social groups previously denied it. In accordance with postmodernism, Walser seeks to deconstruct the distinction between "high" ("serious") and "low" ("popular") culture, a distinction that also parallels the rise of the New Social Movements and receiving its theoretical justification through psychoanalysis, with metal providing him with substantial resources enabling him to do this, as mostly played out in his third chapter, dealing with the influence of classical music (mostly late Baroque music, particularly Bach and Vivaldi, and virtuosic violin music, mostly Paganini) on metal guitarists and musical forms (i.e. ground bass, the use of modality, harmonic minor scales, etc.). While Deep Purple's Ritchie Blackmore was an early player who drew upon classical music in his guitar stylings, Walser names Eddie Van Halen as a major innovator for second generation metal guitarists, while also spotlighting Randy Rhodes and Yngwe Malmsteen as musicians who sought to raise the prestige of metal by drawing upon models of virtuosity derived from classical music. Walser deftly deconstructs various claims ordinarily thought to ground the prestige of classical music (it's more complex, it requires long years of intensive study to master, etc.) showing that metal fulfills many of these criteria. However, this strategy also underscores my major criticism with Walser's approach: by showing how heavy metal is "really" as complex, etc. as classical music, he covertly accepts the institutional, and thus the class, criteria upon which this hierarchical valuation rests rather than seeking to undermine the original assumptions that sustain such an evaluation. To use Hegelian terminology, he fails to proceed to the essential dialectical step of "negating the negation," of deconstructing the very form that sustains such a hierarchical inscription in the first place; he covertly accepts the terms of the original valuation but only seeks to show that metal "really" meets these criteria without questioning these criteria themselves. His approach is thus undertheorized, thus undermining its effectivity as a critique. Perhaps the most interesting and certainly the most topical chapter of the book is the fourth one on constructions of gender in metal. Walser claims metal is primarily a masculine genre, which was certainly true when he was writing it, but is one of the things that dates the book. Still, he is to be commended for his awareness of the inclusion of women into the institutions and fan base of metal. One of his most interesting and insightful forays into the gendered constructions of metal is his evocation of androgyny in metal, particularly as evidenced in glam metal and "bad boy" groups such as Bon Jovi (yeah, I know, I agree) and Van Halen. Yet, even here he tends to downplay the role constructions of androgyny play in creating and sustaining sexual attraction, though he notes the increase of female fans and rockers in metal as a result of these developments. However, much more could be done along these lines while still acknowledging Walser's pioneering efforts. Another problem with Walser's approach that appears throughout, but is most evident in his final chapter dealing with "madness," with the irrational, mysticism, and horror as subject matter in heavy metal music. He rightly identifies this dimension as the aspect of metal that causes the greatest discomfort to the guardians of establishment culture. Yet, his own approach largely consist of showing how metal is "really" in line with the establishment, that accusations of devil worship, BDSM, etc. are not "really" what metal is all about, thus largely whitewashing these dimensions, making metal "safe" for mainstream consumption. He is completely clueless about the way these discourses in metal are related to strains of occult practices and oppositional counter-cultures long cultivated by subaltern populations within oppressive regimes, particularly in the borderlands of Christian Europe, where Christian colonization came late or was incompletely performed (i.e. the Celtic fringe, Scandinavia, the Baltic States, and Eastern Europe more generally), or, in the case of witchcraft, was cultivated as a counter-discourse by women. He thus seeks to placate establishment concerns by either ignoring these dimensions or by reinscribing them in a manner acceptable to the status quo. This may have been a successful strategy for getting tenure, but it makes his book much less useful to many devotees of metal, especially now that metal has largely become a lingua franca for popular music with a system of subgenres that taxes even the most inveterate of catalogers. All in all, a worthwhile text, peppered with many insights, especially useful for the way he takes the music seriously as music and comes up with new ways of analyzing the music which make it useful to trained musicians and professional musicologists, without being so esoteric as to render it overly forbidding to fans, readers from other disciplines. This could be made into a great book if one were to take seriously the counter-cultural claims of metal, linking them up to histories of colonization, conquest, and class domination within the counter-hegemonic cultures of Europe and beyond.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ian Vance

    ten dollar words about power chords.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abra

    This book has retained its relevance and does not read like a text that is 30 years old. Many of the points Walser mentions about Heavy Metal are still current while other points about censorship brought me back to my youth when heavy metal was yet more controversial. Walser tears apart common critiques of the music (too violence focused, too satanic, too meaningless, etc.) while re-situating the genre its own socio-economic and political context. But that doesn't mean heavy metal is exempt from This book has retained its relevance and does not read like a text that is 30 years old. Many of the points Walser mentions about Heavy Metal are still current while other points about censorship brought me back to my youth when heavy metal was yet more controversial. Walser tears apart common critiques of the music (too violence focused, too satanic, too meaningless, etc.) while re-situating the genre its own socio-economic and political context. But that doesn't mean heavy metal is exempt from criticism - Walser discusses at length the racism and sexism inherent to the genre, from the devaluation of femininity and overvaluation of masculinity, to the practice of straight up stealing songs from black musicians in the 1970s. It would be interesting to have an "update" on heavy metal using the same conceptual framework of Walser since heavy metal has become more international in recent years and now encompasses developing countries where it used to be virtually non-existent. I find that even though more modern texts about the genre pay close attention to economic factors, they are often 'color-blind' and exclude intersectional types of cultural and musical analysis. Walser's analysis is refreshingly different and critical, and should be taken as an inspiration for future investigations in music, also beyond the genre of heavy metal.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michal Puchovský

    Zatiaľ asi najlepšia vedecká kniha o metale, ktorú som čítal. Vhodne kombinuje diskurzívnu a žanrovú analýzu. A na rozdiel od D.Weinstein a do určitej miery aj Kahna-Harrisa sa muzikologicky vybrané metalové piesne. Jeho závery sú dobre podložené zo všetkých strán.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Theophilo Pinto

    Uma das coisas que eu gosto em livros é ver seus autores colocando ideias e fatos de modo criativo ou inesperado. Por exemplo, li um tempo atrás que em 1964, quando os Beatles perderam o 1º lugar nas paradas americanas, foi para Hello, Dolly, de Louis Armstrong, então com 62 anos. Boa informação pra começar uma discussão sobre ‘boa música’... Esses mesmos Beatles mantiveram um recorde de público sendo uma banda estrangeira em solo americano. Foram superados pelo Led Zeppelin, em 1973. E se você Uma das coisas que eu gosto em livros é ver seus autores colocando ideias e fatos de modo criativo ou inesperado. Por exemplo, li um tempo atrás que em 1964, quando os Beatles perderam o 1º lugar nas paradas americanas, foi para Hello, Dolly, de Louis Armstrong, então com 62 anos. Boa informação pra começar uma discussão sobre ‘boa música’... Esses mesmos Beatles mantiveram um recorde de público sendo uma banda estrangeira em solo americano. Foram superados pelo Led Zeppelin, em 1973. E se você acha que os Beatles e o Led Zep têm em comum o estilo rock pura e simplesmente, vale a pena ler o livro de Robert Walser Running with the Devil, título de seu livro e de uma música de Van Halen. Taí um livro bacana, especialmente para quem não quer apenas saber sobre sua banda de Heavy Metal (HM) favorita. Walser cita outra coisa interessante: o primeiro festival Monsters of Rock dos EUA (que teve uma reedição há pouco tempo aqui em Sampa) foi um fracasso de público lá. Isso porque os empresários colocaram várias bandas que eram conhecidas como HM na estante da loja de disco, mas que tinham públicos diferentes, às vezes antagônicos. Resultado: a presença de determinada banda numa noite espantava o público de outra, que se apresentaria em seguida, mostrando como o gênero tem um público ‘engajado’ e informado. Também mostrou o quão pouco sabe quem é de fora desse mundo. Naturalmente, Walser critica também a Academia no geral, que por muito tempo viu esse assunto como pouco digno de ser estudado. O livro é um dos impulsos (pontapés?) que ele tenta dar para reverter a situação. Acho que conseguiu. Walser gasta um bom espaço tentando mostrar alguns elementos musicais do HM que são únicos, ou pelo menos principais, a ele. Para quem pensa numa musicologia mais “hardcore” (me desculpem o trocadilho, mas não pude resistir!...) onde são analisadas partituras, o livro de Walser é um prato cheio. Imagino que alguém que não saiba ler partituras não precisa lê-las para seguir adiante, mas para quem quer ver algumas transcrições de solos como os de Van Halen e outros, não vai sair decepcionado. É claro que os solos hoje em dia devem estar disponíveis na internet, mas não as análises de Walser. Recomendadíssimo. Uma das coisas que eu não havia percebido é que, mesmo compartilhando o virtuosismo do rock progressivo, sua fonte de inspiração não vem dos autores românticos. Exemplifico: Emerson Lake & Palmer, famosa banda ProgRock fez ‘releituras’ de compositores eruditos como Mussorgsky (Quadros de uma exposição) e de Aaron Copland (Hoedown). A primeira peça tornou-se um disco gravado ao vivo e colocou a banda no cenário mercado musical definitivamente. A segunda tornou-se uma espécie de ‘abertura’ para a maioria dos shows que fizeram por pelo menos uma década a partir daí. Rick Wakeman, outro progrocker usou trechos de Grieg em Journey to the centre of the Earth. Isso para falar de dois artistas apenas. Mostra Walser que muito do HM vem de Bach e não de Mozart, Paganini e não Liszt. O HM não estaria querendo apropriar-se de uma música prestigiada para ser glorificado, caso do progressivo, e sim fazer uma releitura de compositores eruditos num contexto atual. Só essa ideia já deve deixar muita gente querendo dizer o que pensa (diferente) sobre isso, não será? Um capítulo menos contundente para mim refere-se à questão do gênero nessa música, indicando que há prioritariamente um público masculino que a consome. Ainda que isso seja verdade, vejo problemas em transportar a representação do masculino/feminino para a realidade brasileira, que me parece muito diferente daquela que deve ser a americana, mostrada por ele. Afinal, não me parece que neste país a mulher seja vista como necessariamente passiva na sua ação frente ao seu parceiro ou que todo o brasileiro veja o próprio automóvel como uma extensão do seu órgão sexual. Enfim, algumas coisas parecem mesmo de outras terras e fica mais difícil seguir suas ideias nessa área. Outra parte ótima é a crítica que ele faz sobre alguns autores que escreveram sobre o estilo, mas numa ótica menos construtiva. Alguns deles culpam a música pela apologia às drogas, ao culto ao diabo e outras coisas que também são vistos em outros gêneros musicais, dependendo de quem está fazendo o resmungo. Afinal, basta pensar na música eletrônica, no funk carioca e tantas outras para encontrar os mesmos demônios que, me parece, não estão nas músicas e sim na cabeça de quem as ouve. De qualquer modo, o capítulo é bom para mostrar quem é o ‘inimigo’ no campo do HM, digamos assim. Em resumo, este é um bom livro para quem quer saber alguma coisa sobre o Heavy Metal e as ideias que passam em um debate ligado à história, à musicologia e outras ciências humanas. Pode ser que interesse também a alguém que goste apenas da música. Faça a aposta!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Simon Mcleish

    Originally published on my blog here in October 1999. Heavy metal music is a strange phenomenon. Despite derision from rock critics and bitter emnity from the establishment, it became one of the most popular subcultures of the eighties, when it and rap changed mainstream popular music indelibly. Such a phenomenon is clearly a gift to cultural studies. Running With the Devil is a sympathetic examination of heavy metal, looking at its history, defining musical characteristics, examining its appeal Originally published on my blog here in October 1999. Heavy metal music is a strange phenomenon. Despite derision from rock critics and bitter emnity from the establishment, it became one of the most popular subcultures of the eighties, when it and rap changed mainstream popular music indelibly. Such a phenomenon is clearly a gift to cultural studies. Running With the Devil is a sympathetic examination of heavy metal, looking at its history, defining musical characteristics, examining its appeal to its fans and the claims of its detractors. Walser is well qualified to do this, being a classically trained musician who has been a guitarist in a heavy metal band, as well as a researcher in cultural studies. He criticises preceding studies of metal on several grounds. Like many accounts of popular music, the more musicological ones have tended to concentrate on the lyrics, ignoring what most fans feel forms the major part of the songs (the musical content, which Walser feels is vital to the appeal of heavy metal). This is partly because in verbal descriptions it is easier to analyse words than music and partly because of the automatic assumption that there is nothing worth analysing in popular music. On the other hand, critical accounts that have concentrated on the cultural aspects of heavy metal have had distinctly flawes methodologies, frequently accepting the stereotypes of heavy metal without investigation. (An example of this is the assumption that fans of heavy metal are almost exclusively working class in background; Walser used questionnaires and conversations with fans to discover that in the late eighties at least this was not the case: fans' economic backgrounds followed the distribution of the US as a whole.) Walser uses his own musical analysis to convincingly explain the large fan base built up by heavy metal. The music is about power and transcendence. This is not just because of the high volume. Effects like the guitar solo, where the virtuousity of the lead guitar overcomes all opposition, and the aggressive nature and delivery of the lyrics alsoe contribute. This is the reason why fans of heavy metal are in my experience as well as in Walser's far more gentle than the violent image frequently assigned to the music. Listening to heavy metal has such a cathartic effect that it is a calming rather than enraging influence. The empowerment provided by heavy metal explains why it appeals to so many, particularly teenaged boys; why the fans tend to be quite gregarious, seeking out other fans to form a strong subculture; why the right wing US establishment saw it as such a threat. A fair proportion of the book is devoted to refutation of many of the claims made by critics of heavy metal, some of which are sufficiently ludicrous that it's a pity that they need to be contradicted. They are based on a stereotypical view of the genre, on selective quotation of lyrics - Walser gives a wonderful example of this: lines from Iron Maiden's Number of the Beast have been used to "prove" that Satanism is the hidden agenda of heavy metal, yet the next few lines express strong disapproval of the Satanic ritual described - and on misleading and invented statistics - the claim that "most" heavy metal songs are about Satanism is easily refuted just by counting song themes. Running With the Devil is a fascinating examination of the heavy metal subculture. A little ironic touch is contained in the title: the difference between heavy metal culture and the academic culture for which the book is written is shown by the restoration of the final "g" to the first word of the title of Van Halen's song Runnin' With the Devil.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robb Bridson

    Excellent scholarly work on the subject of heavy metal. This book uses musicology, music theory, sociology, and critical theory to blow away opponents of metal and to essentially build something like a cultural theory of metal. To the metalhead, this book makes a lot of what you already know more tangible, from the emptiness of elitist critiques to the genius of the great works of metal, without glossing over some of the real cultural problems within metal (such as acting as a conduit of patriarc Excellent scholarly work on the subject of heavy metal. This book uses musicology, music theory, sociology, and critical theory to blow away opponents of metal and to essentially build something like a cultural theory of metal. To the metalhead, this book makes a lot of what you already know more tangible, from the emptiness of elitist critiques to the genius of the great works of metal, without glossing over some of the real cultural problems within metal (such as acting as a conduit of patriarchal values). Despite the academic tone, this was an enthralling read. It's not just about metal, but about society itself. It's a little old. In fact it was written around the time I was in high school, just beginning to really scratch the surface of metal, and it was written before a lot of huge things that changed metal, how metal is classified, and how elements of metal blurred into other forms of music (grunge, the death of glam, ni metal, industrial metal, the mainstreaming of death metal, evolution of black and goth metal)... all of which I'd love to see the author's take on.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Sadly not as much critical theory as I had hoped for but an excellent analysis of heavy metal. The book adequately addresses heavy metal as a whole from within and provides truly insightful analysis of quite a few different bands. Walser analyzes everything from videos, lyrics, musical notes to shifts in tempo to create an in-depth critique of the music. Sadly, the book is limited in scope. Addressing only a few themes and due to it's time written it doesn't address anything past 1990. An accoun Sadly not as much critical theory as I had hoped for but an excellent analysis of heavy metal. The book adequately addresses heavy metal as a whole from within and provides truly insightful analysis of quite a few different bands. Walser analyzes everything from videos, lyrics, musical notes to shifts in tempo to create an in-depth critique of the music. Sadly, the book is limited in scope. Addressing only a few themes and due to it's time written it doesn't address anything past 1990. An account of feminism would be interesting taking into consideration Dark Angel's Time Does Not Heal or the misogyny in early death metal. What is most important in this book is that it's a great template for further research into music. This is a respectable scholarly work and an interesting read for any fan of music, not just the aforementioned genre.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    thought-provoking (but VERY academic) look at heavy metal culture from 1970's to the 1980's. not being a trained musician, i did have some difficulty following the more technical passages regarding music theory. Despite this, i still found Walser's arguments to be lively and ultimately engaging, if not somewhat dated giving the genre's evolution over the past two decades. even for those who aren't necessarily fans of heavy metal, but are interested in culture and the impact music has on the form thought-provoking (but VERY academic) look at heavy metal culture from 1970's to the 1980's. not being a trained musician, i did have some difficulty following the more technical passages regarding music theory. Despite this, i still found Walser's arguments to be lively and ultimately engaging, if not somewhat dated giving the genre's evolution over the past two decades. even for those who aren't necessarily fans of heavy metal, but are interested in culture and the impact music has on the former (and you don't mind reading books published by an academic press) then this is a good book to pick up.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Curtis

    There are not many academic theory books about metal style so this is a welcome rarity. But, the book sometimes borders on hagiography. The theory portion is maybe drawn out a little too thin, perhaps too limited in scope. Mostly about guitarists like Randy Rhoads, and could summarized as "they preferred Bach and Vivaldi to Handle and Mozart." This is not much of a revelation. The academic form of the book seems mostly an attempt to validate metal as a genre. Personally, I found the Vitamin Stri There are not many academic theory books about metal style so this is a welcome rarity. But, the book sometimes borders on hagiography. The theory portion is maybe drawn out a little too thin, perhaps too limited in scope. Mostly about guitarists like Randy Rhoads, and could summarized as "they preferred Bach and Vivaldi to Handle and Mozart." This is not much of a revelation. The academic form of the book seems mostly an attempt to validate metal as a genre. Personally, I found the Vitamin String Quartet's recording of Slayer a more revealing examination of metal style.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tiny Pants

    This is one of my favorite books ever. I first read it in 1998 or 1999, but I remember reading the review of it in Rolling Stone in 1993 when it came out (since RS are morons, they didn't totally love it). The author is a musicologist at UCLA, he was mostly working at Dartmouth when he was writing this though. He is the man! I'd like to meet him, but I'd prob either freak out or nerd out, like correcting him that when he says a KISS song is playing on the radio in the beginning of a Poison video This is one of my favorite books ever. I first read it in 1998 or 1999, but I remember reading the review of it in Rolling Stone in 1993 when it came out (since RS are morons, they didn't totally love it). The author is a musicologist at UCLA, he was mostly working at Dartmouth when he was writing this though. He is the man! I'd like to meet him, but I'd prob either freak out or nerd out, like correcting him that when he says a KISS song is playing on the radio in the beginning of a Poison video, it is actually a Poison cover of a KISS song that is playing.

  12. 4 out of 5

    K

    Walser's book is an early attempt to garner some academic credibility for the study of HM. It is, however, woefully lacking in several respects, and underlines the difficulties of crossing the boundaries between academia and pop-culture. In particular, Walser's analysis is strangely behind the times, in that he focuses on musicians and acts who for the most part were well past their heyday of relevance by 1990 (the publishing date of the book). Interesting in its musicology-driven analysis of th Walser's book is an early attempt to garner some academic credibility for the study of HM. It is, however, woefully lacking in several respects, and underlines the difficulties of crossing the boundaries between academia and pop-culture. In particular, Walser's analysis is strangely behind the times, in that he focuses on musicians and acts who for the most part were well past their heyday of relevance by 1990 (the publishing date of the book). Interesting in its musicology-driven analysis of the guts of what makes HM, in Martni Popoff's words, "the most powerful music on the planet."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Yuri

    I miss analysis like this when it comes to popular music, most specially Metal. I still have just so much to learn about musical theory, but this was a really nice place to start when it comes to knowing what really makes the heavy metal sound. Highly recommended to those who like this music and those who dislike this musical genre, as well. I wish Walser would write another book, this time on extreme (Black and Death) Metal.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Beaudoin

    This is a nice overview of the history of 1980s metal, and it specifically seeks to draw links between metal and classical music. I think at times Walser tries to legitimize heavy metal by focusing on this connection (which I find problematic), but over all this is an easily read scholarly attempt at understanding the sociological components of heavy metal as a genre.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alejo

    This book is MONOLITHIC. Focuses mostly on Classic Heavy Metal and Glam Metal, Extreme Metal and even Thrash Metal are passing references. Gets heavy handed with the marxist references, but it's mostly a good book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    God this sounds good. I think Byron might want to check this out too...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    If you think Heavy Metal is mindless and crass, read this book. Written by a musicologist, this book is a must read for heavy metal fan and detractor alike.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sergiu

    One of the canonic studies on Heavy Metal music

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zippoku

    cheese metal? hell no! it's van halen!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    read for an essay on gender identity & music read for an essay on gender identity & music

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aci Arta

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brad

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jayndo

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lilah

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

  26. 4 out of 5

    bryce

  27. 4 out of 5

    Harsh

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kim Schwenk

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Graham

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kyla Squires

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