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DRACULA is an 1897 epistolary novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. It was 1st published as a hardcover in 1897 by Archibald Constable & Co. Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel & invasion literature. Structurally it's an epistolary novel, DRACULA is an 1897 epistolary novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. It was 1st published as a hardcover in 1897 by Archibald Constable & Co. Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel & invasion literature. Structurally it's an epistolary novel, told as a series of letters, diary entries, ships' logs, etc. Literary critics have examined many themes in the novel, such as the role of women in Victorian culture, conventional & conservative sexuality, immigration, colonialism, folklore & postcolonialism. Altho Stoker didn't invent the vampire, the novel's influence on the popularity of vampires has been singularly responsible for many theatrical, film & tv interpretations since its publication. FRANKENSTEIN or The Modern Prometheus is a novel about a failed artificial life experiment that's produced a monster, written by Mary Shelley. She started writing the story when she was 18. It was published when she was 21. The 1st edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the 2nd edition, published in France in 1823. She'd travelled the region in which the story takes place. The topics of galvanism & other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her future husband Percy Bysshe Shelley. The storyline was taken from a dream. She was talking with three writer-colleagues, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron & John Polidori. They decided they would have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for weeks about what her storyline could be, she dreamt about a scientist who created life & was horrified by what he'd made. Then Frankenstein was written. Frankenstein is infused with some elements of the Gothic novel & the Romantic movement & is also considered to be an early example of sf. Brian Aldiss has argued it should be considered the 1st true sf story, because unlike in previous stories with fantastical elements resembling those of later sf, the central character "makes a deliberate decision" & "turns to modern experiments in the laboratory" to achieve fantastic results. The story is partially based on Giovanni Aldini's electrical experiments on dead & living animals & was also a warning against the expansion of modern man in the Industrial Revolution, alluded to in its subtitle, The Modern Prometheus. It's had a considerable influence across literature & popular culture & spawned a complete genre of horror stories & films.


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DRACULA is an 1897 epistolary novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. It was 1st published as a hardcover in 1897 by Archibald Constable & Co. Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel & invasion literature. Structurally it's an epistolary novel, DRACULA is an 1897 epistolary novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. It was 1st published as a hardcover in 1897 by Archibald Constable & Co. Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel & invasion literature. Structurally it's an epistolary novel, told as a series of letters, diary entries, ships' logs, etc. Literary critics have examined many themes in the novel, such as the role of women in Victorian culture, conventional & conservative sexuality, immigration, colonialism, folklore & postcolonialism. Altho Stoker didn't invent the vampire, the novel's influence on the popularity of vampires has been singularly responsible for many theatrical, film & tv interpretations since its publication. FRANKENSTEIN or The Modern Prometheus is a novel about a failed artificial life experiment that's produced a monster, written by Mary Shelley. She started writing the story when she was 18. It was published when she was 21. The 1st edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the 2nd edition, published in France in 1823. She'd travelled the region in which the story takes place. The topics of galvanism & other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her future husband Percy Bysshe Shelley. The storyline was taken from a dream. She was talking with three writer-colleagues, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron & John Polidori. They decided they would have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for weeks about what her storyline could be, she dreamt about a scientist who created life & was horrified by what he'd made. Then Frankenstein was written. Frankenstein is infused with some elements of the Gothic novel & the Romantic movement & is also considered to be an early example of sf. Brian Aldiss has argued it should be considered the 1st true sf story, because unlike in previous stories with fantastical elements resembling those of later sf, the central character "makes a deliberate decision" & "turns to modern experiments in the laboratory" to achieve fantastic results. The story is partially based on Giovanni Aldini's electrical experiments on dead & living animals & was also a warning against the expansion of modern man in the Industrial Revolution, alluded to in its subtitle, The Modern Prometheus. It's had a considerable influence across literature & popular culture & spawned a complete genre of horror stories & films.

30 review for Classics of Horror: Dracula & Frankenstein

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    4.5 stars (for Frankenstein).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I thought I had read these a long time ago, when I found this copy from my aunt from way back in 1974. So, I thought I would read these. I saw all the movies, so I knew the stories. DRACULA was an amazing story and well written. It was different than what I thought it would be and I thoroughly enjoyed it. FRANKENSTEIN was a bit of a disappointment. I enjoy the story and I felt pathos for the monsters and for Frankenstein, but I thought the writing was not as beautiful or as fluid. I also think t I thought I had read these a long time ago, when I found this copy from my aunt from way back in 1974. So, I thought I would read these. I saw all the movies, so I knew the stories. DRACULA was an amazing story and well written. It was different than what I thought it would be and I thoroughly enjoyed it. FRANKENSTEIN was a bit of a disappointment. I enjoy the story and I felt pathos for the monsters and for Frankenstein, but I thought the writing was not as beautiful or as fluid. I also think that there were threads that were not handled clearly and characters that were not fleshed out or even discussed after one or two mentions. (Frankenstein brother, Edward, isn't even discussed and he is the only family member let alive by the end.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Philip Battle

    A re-read for me; I remember reading this book in my mid twenties, but appreciated it more this time round. The Victorian era was certainly the high watermark of British literature and storytelling. In this book we have two classic horror novels, which in my opinion neither film or TV adaptation has ever fully done justice to the books. Indeed, the written word of Dracula in particular, has at times, been totally forgotten in modern screenplays. These are as the title states two "Classics of Hor A re-read for me; I remember reading this book in my mid twenties, but appreciated it more this time round. The Victorian era was certainly the high watermark of British literature and storytelling. In this book we have two classic horror novels, which in my opinion neither film or TV adaptation has ever fully done justice to the books. Indeed, the written word of Dracula in particular, has at times, been totally forgotten in modern screenplays. These are as the title states two "Classics of Horror". and must reads for any lovers of "proper" literature! :)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jos Langehuis

    I just rated the stories with three stars and I am already starting to feel guilty. There are the classics, the modern variations might be a better read in the 21st century, but they would never have been written if Dracula and Frankenstein had never existed. So please take your time and give it a chance. The classics deserve it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Edwina Callan

    My goal for 2018 was to finally read this book that I've had for many, many years. 11:50 P.M. 12/31/2018 and Finished! I found both of these books extremely tedious and am clueless as to the how and why of them being considered "classics". Blech!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

    This rating is for Dracula only.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ariele

    excellent books

  8. 5 out of 5

    Suri

    Está bien redactado y hecho para niños (estoy casi segura de que es paraa niños lol), lo leí cuando estaba más chica y me gustó bastante.

  9. 4 out of 5

    P.S. Winn

    You have to grab these stories in the hardcover version to keep on your must read book shelf.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michael Picot

    I struggled between three stars and four stars with these two books. Considering that they were written in the 19th century, and I don't read many novels from the 19th century, I have a feeling they were excellent novels in their time. But, given the context of the 21st century and the evolution of writing during that time, especially in the horror and science fiction drama, specifically the horror novels that I've read, these two would be more of a three star rating. Don't get me wrong, I think I struggled between three stars and four stars with these two books. Considering that they were written in the 19th century, and I don't read many novels from the 19th century, I have a feeling they were excellent novels in their time. But, given the context of the 21st century and the evolution of writing during that time, especially in the horror and science fiction drama, specifically the horror novels that I've read, these two would be more of a three star rating. Don't get me wrong, I think Stoker and Shelley were geniuses in their day, and the contribution of these novels to popular culture is immeasurable. I did enjoy the discussion and depictions of the natural surroundings and geography of the settings in both books. I feel like Dracula had a little more action than Frankenstein, but Frankenstein was a little more dramatic and emotional. I think I felt more for the characters in Frankenstein. They both reminded me of Greek or Shakespearean tragedies. Again, if I read these books at face value in today's context I think the actual writing would be a three-star for me, but the impact these characters that Stoker and Shelley created on culture and the number of stories and characters that have been expounded on since then, make both of these novels seminal moments in the history of horror and science fiction literature. I contemplated that with awe the whole time I read these novels. I am intrigued to learn more about these characters and the books, plays, novels and movies that have spun off over time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jewel Allen

    I read Frankenstein first. This book I'd rate two stars. Slow start, but the fifth chapter was as good as promised. Terrifying premise, and very real. And then some of the later chapters switched to philosophical treatise, which wasn't as interesting. I skipped over a lot of those. The story of how this novel evolved was the amazing part; the author was only 18/19, Lord Byron challenged her and other writers to write a horror story, and she had this dream. The four stars of this review was really I read Frankenstein first. This book I'd rate two stars. Slow start, but the fifth chapter was as good as promised. Terrifying premise, and very real. And then some of the later chapters switched to philosophical treatise, which wasn't as interesting. I skipped over a lot of those. The story of how this novel evolved was the amazing part; the author was only 18/19, Lord Byron challenged her and other writers to write a horror story, and she had this dream. The four stars of this review was really for Dracula. Unrelenting suspense, although sometimes the characters did head scratchers, the kind that makes a reader say, "Don't go into that room after dark!! Duh!" Some details seemed really bizarre, but the author ties up the details very nicely. The movie which starred Winona Ryder was very exploitative of the story's Freudian elements. It was good to read the original, devoid of Hollywood sensationalism, and to see why this book is considered the best of horror fiction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Pinkerton

    this is for Dracula only. I'd rather save Frank for another day when I'm feeling this genre. I really loved the story. It was suspenseful and wonderfully written. I loved how Dracula was so gentlemanly and accommodating to Mr. Harker in the beginning of his stay at the castle. It was almost hard to see him as the villain. It was somewhat annoying though that Van Helsing seemed to go from a respected Dr. to a bit of a drama queen. Dec 5-6 2017 so I finally read Frankenstein....it started a bit slow this is for Dracula only. I'd rather save Frank for another day when I'm feeling this genre. I really loved the story. It was suspenseful and wonderfully written. I loved how Dracula was so gentlemanly and accommodating to Mr. Harker in the beginning of his stay at the castle. It was almost hard to see him as the villain. It was somewhat annoying though that Van Helsing seemed to go from a respected Dr. to a bit of a drama queen. Dec 5-6 2017 so I finally read Frankenstein....it started a bit slow and boring, but by chapter 5 things finally got interesting. I have to admit my favorite chapters were those told by the "monster" himself. this story was nothing like I expected. I cant help but wonder how different things would have been if only he were given time with the blind man. or even just kind words from Frankenstein himself.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joanie

    Even though I didn't love either book that much I loved that they were combined in one volume here. The two books are just meant to be together.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marlove Galicia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. i think its a great story i like horror story and romance but my best is horror but if i started reading story the story!

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

    Both classics for very good reasons, these books should be read especially by people who are familiar with the stories only from the movies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mercedes Harris

    I enjoyed Dracula much more than Frankenstein. Frankenstein was a slow start and a pretty quick wrapped up ending.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John

    fiction,fantasy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yadav Prasanth

    Exaggerating and Thrilling and suspense Murdery ...

  19. 5 out of 5

    April

    Just reading Frankenstein

  20. 5 out of 5

    Somer Schaffer

    I didn't read Frankenstein, too much of the same context and genre for me. Sometime I'll get to Shelley's book, but right now I need some modern romance.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Read dracula first, finished it on Dec 1 2008. Started reading Frankenstein October 2011 and am now about half way done with it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I plan to read only the Dracula portion of this book at this time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    Two classic horror stories merged into one book, i don't think modern horror could touch these two.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nanka

    i want read this book very much

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aldane Anderson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joel W

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Violet

  29. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Kosa

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lakshya

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