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Failure to Connect: How Computers Affect Our Children's Minds – and What We Can Do About It

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* When should children start using computers? * How should schools incorporate computer use into their curriculum? * Which types of computer software programs should be avoided? * Are children who don't have computers in class and at home doomed to fall behind their peers? Few parents and educators stop to consider that computers, used incorrectly, may do far more harm th * When should children start using computers? * How should schools incorporate computer use into their curriculum? * Which types of computer software programs should be avoided? * Are children who don't have computers in class and at home doomed to fall behind their peers? Few parents and educators stop to consider that computers, used incorrectly, may do far more harm than good to a child's growing brain and social/emotional development. In this comprehensive and practical guide to kids and computers, Jane M. Healy, Ph.D., author of the groundbreaking bestseller Endangered Minds, examines the advantages and drawbacks of computer use for kids at home and school, exploring its effects on their health, mental development, and creativity. In addition, this timely and ey-opening book presents: * Concrete examples of how to develop a technology plan and use computers successfully with children of different age groups as supplements to classroom curricula, as research tools, or in family projects * Resources for reliable reviews of child-oriented software * Questions parents should ask when their children are using computers in school * Advice on how to manage computer use at home


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* When should children start using computers? * How should schools incorporate computer use into their curriculum? * Which types of computer software programs should be avoided? * Are children who don't have computers in class and at home doomed to fall behind their peers? Few parents and educators stop to consider that computers, used incorrectly, may do far more harm th * When should children start using computers? * How should schools incorporate computer use into their curriculum? * Which types of computer software programs should be avoided? * Are children who don't have computers in class and at home doomed to fall behind their peers? Few parents and educators stop to consider that computers, used incorrectly, may do far more harm than good to a child's growing brain and social/emotional development. In this comprehensive and practical guide to kids and computers, Jane M. Healy, Ph.D., author of the groundbreaking bestseller Endangered Minds, examines the advantages and drawbacks of computer use for kids at home and school, exploring its effects on their health, mental development, and creativity. In addition, this timely and ey-opening book presents: * Concrete examples of how to develop a technology plan and use computers successfully with children of different age groups as supplements to classroom curricula, as research tools, or in family projects * Resources for reliable reviews of child-oriented software * Questions parents should ask when their children are using computers in school * Advice on how to manage computer use at home

30 review for Failure to Connect: How Computers Affect Our Children's Minds – and What We Can Do About It

  1. 5 out of 5

    heather-lee

    This book was very helpful in backing up many of the views I've recently heard expressed about the dangers (yes dangers!) of wholeheartedly and uncritically pairing up children and technology. Healy offers practical advise about wisely choosing software that can benefit older children, but she makes no bones about the waste of time, money, and developmental energy that is the early childhood technology market. It would be helpful to read an updated version of this book, however, as most of the d This book was very helpful in backing up many of the views I've recently heard expressed about the dangers (yes dangers!) of wholeheartedly and uncritically pairing up children and technology. Healy offers practical advise about wisely choosing software that can benefit older children, but she makes no bones about the waste of time, money, and developmental energy that is the early childhood technology market. It would be helpful to read an updated version of this book, however, as most of the data that she references is now quite dated. Still, Healy makes a compelling argument for looking critically at technology use in the childhood years and takes a stand for choosing pedagogical tools that have already been proven, rather than crossing our fingers and hoping that television and computers adequately educate and raise a generation of children for us.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sheena

    I gave this only 2 stars for the purpose for which I decided to read it. This book is more of an academic publication, than an approachable guide for parents. The majority of the book is written in a high manner that is not necessary (in my opinion) to accurately convey the author's thoughts. It largely just spouts off her research results and relays her personal experiences in a very judgmental manner. I'm not saying that you can't get anything of value from this book. But if you're just a norm I gave this only 2 stars for the purpose for which I decided to read it. This book is more of an academic publication, than an approachable guide for parents. The majority of the book is written in a high manner that is not necessary (in my opinion) to accurately convey the author's thoughts. It largely just spouts off her research results and relays her personal experiences in a very judgmental manner. I'm not saying that you can't get anything of value from this book. But if you're just a normal parent, looking for an intelligent source that will help you thoughtfully approach how to guide the interaction your child has with technology (same as me), I don't believe this would be the right book for you.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Very good read. If you have children and a computer, or if your kids are using technology at school, you need to read this. And it's not that Healy is saying that computers are "evil" -- instead she writes very smartly about the good and the bad of technology and how we can be smarter about how it's used -- both in the classroom and at home. People are easily "wowed" by technology and this book serves as a wake up call complete with excellent critical questions all parents (and teachers) need to Very good read. If you have children and a computer, or if your kids are using technology at school, you need to read this. And it's not that Healy is saying that computers are "evil" -- instead she writes very smartly about the good and the bad of technology and how we can be smarter about how it's used -- both in the classroom and at home. People are easily "wowed" by technology and this book serves as a wake up call complete with excellent critical questions all parents (and teachers) need to be asking. I give Healy credit too -- she has done the legwork and the research so that this book stands on firm ground.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Deanne

    I found this book to be disappointing as the author appears to have great bias in her thoughts regarding computers, and technology in general. With very little academic study, she makes a case against computers. I would be interested to see updated studies that are current, with the current programs and technologies available to children today. This is the post-digital revolution era, I'd like to see more on this topic as everyone is inclined to put a laptop in the hands of every school child. I I found this book to be disappointing as the author appears to have great bias in her thoughts regarding computers, and technology in general. With very little academic study, she makes a case against computers. I would be interested to see updated studies that are current, with the current programs and technologies available to children today. This is the post-digital revolution era, I'd like to see more on this topic as everyone is inclined to put a laptop in the hands of every school child. It really needs to be addressed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Starr

    Bottom line: computers aren't a panacea, not even close. Don't worry about your kids being "behind" because they'll learn how to navigate technology very quickly. This book is 13 years old now, so a lot of the data was dated and examples were as well. But I think the points were good. I did not like the structure of the book. Too many sections and subsections.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    The author clearly loves technology but just not in early education. Time and time again she makes very clear that children under the age of eight do not need to use computers in order to learn. Personally, while I share many of her viewpoints, I still take advantage of using the iPad in my preschool class (when appropriate). Overall, despite the technology referenced in the book being very dated (they talk about floppy disks... let that sink in) the research is very much relevant to today's tea The author clearly loves technology but just not in early education. Time and time again she makes very clear that children under the age of eight do not need to use computers in order to learn. Personally, while I share many of her viewpoints, I still take advantage of using the iPad in my preschool class (when appropriate). Overall, despite the technology referenced in the book being very dated (they talk about floppy disks... let that sink in) the research is very much relevant to today's teachers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angie Libert

    I think the author did a good job at presenting the pros and cons of computer use with kids. She also had great suggestions for how kids can use computers without harmful effects.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marybeth

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

  11. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Kugler

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Rockenbeck

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen Goldstein

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Britten

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sheikh Tajamul

  17. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Wood

  18. 5 out of 5

    Simala Kureishy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  20. 5 out of 5

    Picturepoet

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Giuga

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anna Robertson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anwer Qureishi

  25. 5 out of 5

    Denise

  26. 5 out of 5

    cassie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kay

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rod Pyle

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ronaldo Hernandez hernandez

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